Post List

  • October 9, 2015
  • 04:25 PM

Changing body colours with drugs and poisons

by Rosin Cerate in Rosin Cerate

It's time for yet another colour post! Deadly poisons and useful drugs can cause regions of your body to take on a different colour from normal. In addition to being super weird, these unexpected colours often provide a valuable clue for doctors looking to make a diagnosis. Let's look at a couple of examples...... Read more »

  • October 9, 2015
  • 08:11 AM


by AG McCluskey in Zongo's Cancer Diaries

New research shows that elephants get cancer less often than we do. But how can this help us........ Read more »

AG McCluskey. (2015) Trumpity-Trump!. Zongo's Cancer Diaries. info:/

  • October 9, 2015
  • 07:14 AM

Open Access vs Predator

by Nesru Koroso in United Academics

Predatory Open Access publishers on the rise

open access, publishing, open access publishing, predators, predatory publishing, articles, peer review

The increase in so-called “predatory” Open Access publishers is posing a threat to the integrity of Open Access publishing. Predatory Open Access publishers charge authors high publishing fees without providing proper editorial and peer review services. They are abusing the opportunity created by the Gold Open Access publishing mod........ Read more »

  • October 9, 2015
  • 07:02 AM

Police observers are more observant than ordinary  civilians

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

Most research has not shown police to be any more observant than ordinary civilians—even though judges and juries often make assumptions that police witnesses are more reliable than civilian eyewitnesses. New research by Dutch researchers shows that police observers were more aware of details in a drug deal near a hotel which had been recorded […]

Related posts:
Are jurors more skeptical of police on the witness stand now? 
“I can look into his eyes and just tell he is lying”
An ........ Read more »

  • October 9, 2015
  • 06:41 AM

The neuroscience of traumatic brain injury

by neurosci in Neuroscientifically Challenged

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that as many as 1.7 million people in the United States experience a traumatic brain injury (TBI) each year, over 15% of which are thought to be sports-related. Despite the relatively high prevalence of these injuries, however, it seems we are just beginning to appreciate the true extent of the effects they can have on the brain. Awareness of previously unrecognized consequences to TBI and repeated TBI--along with the realization that........ Read more »

  • October 9, 2015
  • 05:31 AM

The Poor, Unhappy, Chain-smoking Brain

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

A thought-provoking new paper from Oxford neuroscientists Stephen Smith and colleagues reports a correlation between a certain pattern of brain activity and, well, a great many things.

The researchers took 461 resting state fMRI scans from the open Human Connectome Project (HCP) database. Associated with each scan is a set of 'meta-data' about the volunteer who had the scan. These 158 variables (listed here) cover everything from age and gender, to mental health status, income, and 'times use... Read more »

Smith SM, Nichols TE, Vidaurre D, Winkler AM, Behrens TE, Glasser MF, Ugurbil K, Barch DM, Van Essen DC, & Miller KL. (2015) A positive-negative mode of population covariation links brain connectivity, demographics and behavior. Nature Neuroscience. PMID: 26414616  

  • October 9, 2015
  • 03:08 AM

ADHD and asthma (yet again)

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"Children with ADHD [attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder] have a higher prevalence of asthma than the general Quebec pediatric population."So said the findings of the study by Grizenko and colleagues [1] adding to quite a volume of research potentially connecting the two conditions. During this latest foray into this area of research, researchers also observed that: "Children with ADHD born prematurely and/or those whose mothers experienced stress during pregnancy have a significa........ Read more »

Grizenko N, Osmanlliu E, Fortier MÈ, & Joober R. (2015) Increased Risk of Asthma in Children with ADHD: Role of Prematurity and Maternal Stress during Pregnancy. Journal of the Canadian Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry , 24(2), 109-115. PMID: 26379722  

  • October 8, 2015
  • 01:21 PM

Sex change hormonal treatments alter brain chemistry

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Hormonal treatments administered as part of the procedures for sex reassignment have well-known and well-documented effects on the secondary sexual characteristics of the adult body, shifting a recipient’s physical appearance to that of the opposite sex. New research indicates that these hormonal treatments also alter brain chemistry.... Read more »

Kranz, G., Wadsak, W., Kaufmann, U., Savli, M., Baldinger, P., Gryglewski, G., Haeusler, D., Spies, M., Mitterhauser, M., Kasper, S.... (2015) High-Dose Testosterone Treatment Increases Serotonin Transporter Binding in Transgender People. Biological Psychiatry, 78(8), 525-533. DOI: 10.1016/j.biopsych.2014.09.010  

  • October 8, 2015
  • 12:30 PM

Neury Thursday: Modeling disrupted sleep in Angelman Syndrome

by Allison in Dormivigilia

This study came out of our group here at Morehouse School of Medicine. It concerns a mouse model of disrupted sleep in Angelman Syndrome. Basically, was it the circadian or homeostatic system that is responsible, or both? It was the homeostatic. ... Read more »

Ehlen, J., Jones, K., Pinckney, L., Gray, C., Burette, S., Weinberg, R., Evans, J., Brager, A., Zylka, M., Paul, K.... (2015) Maternal Ube3a Loss Disrupts Sleep Homeostasis But Leaves Circadian Rhythmicity Largely Intact. Journal of Neuroscience, 35(40), 13587-13598. DOI: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2194-15.2015  

  • October 8, 2015
  • 12:06 PM

Behold, The Blue Brain

by neuroecology in Neuroecology

The Blue Brain project releases their first major paper today and boy, it’s a doozy. Including supplements, it’s over 100 pages long, including 40 figures and 6 tables. In order to properly understand everything in the paper, you have to go back … Continue reading →... Read more »

Markram et al. (2015) Reconstruction and Simulation of Neocortical Microcircuitry. Cell. info:/

  • October 8, 2015
  • 11:50 AM

Everybody’s Free To Wear Sunscreen…And Prevent Skin Cancer

by Julia van Rensburg in The 'Scope

Part II in our series looking at the scientific evidence behind sunscreen and skin cancer.... Read more »

  • October 8, 2015
  • 11:38 AM

Who Are You Wearing?: Does Competition Affect How Women View Luxury?

by Melissa Chernick in Science Storiented

What do you think of when I say “luxury consumption”? Probably something that requires a Robin Leach voice over, right? Now what if I ask you why these luxuries are so valued? Is it because they are of excellent quality? Aesthetically appealing? Highly exclusive? Next, consider the audience for the luxury – who is admiring who? And what does that luxury symbolize? Status? Wealth? Success?A recent paper in Evolutionary Psychology takes a look at these questions and has one of the best title........ Read more »

  • October 8, 2015
  • 11:36 AM

Brain Reward and Anabolic Steroids

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

Pine Cone and Peacocks from Vatican MuseumTestosterone displays effects on brain function in both males and females.Emanuela Mhillaj and colleagues recently published a nice summary of what is currently known about the effects of anabolic-androgen steroids (AAS) on the brain.Their review highlighted the potential for AAS to modulate brain reward function and potentially lead to a drug dependence type of abuse pattern.Here are some of my notes on their discussion of AAS and the brain reward syste........ Read more »

Mhillaj E, Morgese MG, Tucci P, Bove M, Schiavone S, & Trabace L. (2015) Effects of anabolic-androgens on brain reward function. Frontiers in neuroscience, 295. PMID: 26379484  

Yates WR, Perry PJ, & Andersen KH. (1990) Illicit anabolic steroid use: a controlled personality study. Acta psychiatrica Scandinavica, 81(6), 548-50. PMID: 2378247  

  • October 8, 2015
  • 08:36 AM

Tough luck, Stretch!

by AG McCluskey in Zongo's Cancer Diaries

Tall people are more likely to get cancer......aren't they?... Read more »

AG McCluskey. (2015) Tough Luck, Stretch. Zongo's Cancer Diaries. info:/

  • October 8, 2015
  • 04:28 AM

KPAX002 for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

My attention was grabbed recently by the paper published by Jon Kaiser [1] (open-access available here) detailing the results of a 'proof-of-concept investigation' examining the use of something called KPAX002 on a small number of participants diagnosed with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS).Looking at how KPAX002 - "a combination of low-dose methylphenidate hydrochloride and mitochondrial support nutrients currently under development by K-PAX Pharmaceuticals" - impacted on fatigue symptoms and "co........ Read more »

  • October 7, 2015
  • 11:30 PM

Social Class Differences in Mental Health: Do Parenting Style and Friendship Play a Role?

by Mark Rubin in Mark Rubin's Social Psychology Research Blog

It is now well-established that social class is positively related to mental health. However, researchers remain unclear about the specific processes that underlie the relation between social class and depression. In some recent research, we investigated the potential roles of parenting style and friendship in explaining the relationship between social class and mental health.... Read more »

  • October 7, 2015
  • 06:53 PM

Catching Breast Cancer Early Is Still Critical

by Marie Benz in Interview with: Dr. Madeleine M A Tilanus-Linthorst PhD Department of Surgery Erasmus University Medical Centre – Cancer Institute Rotterdam, Netherlands  Medical Research: What is the background for this study? Medical Research: Why is this study important? Response: This prospective … Continue reading →
The post Catching Breast Cancer Early Is Still Critical appeared first on
... Read more »

Dr. Madeleine M A Tilanus-Linthorst PhD. (2015) Catching Breast Cancer Early Is Still Critical. info:/

  • October 7, 2015
  • 06:19 PM

Parents influence children’s play of violent video games

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Parents who are more anxious and emotional can impact the amount of violent video games their children play, according to new consumer research from Iowa State University. Russell Laczniak, a professor of marketing and the John and Connie Stafford Professor in Business, says given the harmful effects of violent video games, he and his colleagues wanted to better understand how parents influence children’s behavior.... Read more »

  • October 7, 2015
  • 05:45 PM

Heart Failure Risk Reduced With Increased Physical Activity

by Marie Benz in Interview with: Ambarish Pandey, MD Cardiology Fellow, PGY5 University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390 Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Berry: Physical inactivity is considered a major … Continue reading →
The post Heart Failure Risk Reduced With Increased Physical Activity appeared first on
... Read more »

Ambarish Pandey, MD. (2015) Heart Failure Risk Reduced With Increased Physical Activity. info:/

  • October 7, 2015
  • 05:28 PM

Hypothermia Did Not Improve Outcomes After Traumatic Brain Injury

by Marie Benz in Interview with: Prof. Peter JD Andrews Honorary Professor Department of Anaesthesia University of Edinburgh  Medical Research: What is the background for this study? Prof. Andrews: Therapeutic hypothermia has shown considerable promise as a neuro-protective intervention in many species and … Continue reading →
The post Hypothermia Did Not Improve Outcomes After Traumatic Brain Injury appeared first on
... Read more »

Prof. Peter JD Andrews. (2015) Hypothermia Did Not Improve Outcomes After Traumatic Brain Injury. info:/

join us!

Do you write about peer-reviewed research in your blog? Use to make it easy for your readers — and others from around the world — to find your serious posts about academic research.

If you don't have a blog, you can still use our site to learn about fascinating developments in cutting-edge research from around the world.

Register Now

Research Blogging is powered by SMG Technology.

To learn more, visit