Post List

  • April 21, 2015
  • 08:23 AM
  • 4 views

Gout in Living Kidney Donors

by Cristy at Living Donor 101 in Living Donors Are People Too

A recent study indicates that living kidney donors are at a higher risk of gout than non-donors. ” Gout developed in significantly more donors than non-donors (3.4% vs. 2.0%), a difference that translated into a 60% increased risk of gout among living donors” This appears to be due to living kidney donors’ higher serum uric …
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The post Gout in Living Kidney Donors appeared first on Living Donors Are People Too.
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Lam N.N., Garg A.X., Segev D.L., Schnitzler M.A., Xiao H., Axelrod D., Brennan D.C., Kasiske B.L., Tuttle-Newhall J.E., & Lentine K.L. (2015) Gout after Living Kidney Donation: Correlations with Demographic Traits and Renal Complications. American Journal of Nephrology, 14(3), 231-240. info:/

  • April 21, 2015
  • 04:31 AM
  • 10 views

Jessica Biesiekierski on non-coeliac gluten sensitivity (NCGS)

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

It's not often that I dedicate a blog post to a specific individual and their views and opinions on a particular topic. Today however, I'm doing just that to provide you with a link to the paper from Jessica Biesiekierski on the topic of non-coeliac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) [1] (open-access).The reason? Well, aside from being one of the primary protagonists in the research topic of gluten-related ills outside of the autoimmune condition known as coeliac (celiac) disease (itself the to........ Read more »

Biesiekierski, J., & Iven, J. (2015) Non-coeliac gluten sensitivity: piecing the puzzle together. United European Gastroenterology Journal, 3(2), 160-165. DOI: 10.1177/2050640615578388  

  • April 20, 2015
  • 09:49 PM
  • 8 views

Know your brain: Cochlea

by neurosci in Neuroscientifically Challenged

Where is the cochlea?











cochlea and cochlea in cross-section. image courtesy of openstax college.






The cochlea is a coiled structure that resembles a snail shell (cochlea comes from the Greek kochlos, which means "snail"); it is found within the inner ear. It is a small--yet complex--structure (about the size of a pea) that consists of three canals that run parallel to one another: the scala vestibuli, scala media, and scala tympani.What i........ Read more »

Møller, A. (1994) Auditory Neurophysiology. Journal of Clinical Neurophysiology, 11(3), 284-308. DOI: 10.1097/00004691-199405000-00002  

  • April 20, 2015
  • 04:18 PM
  • 18 views

Urban green spaces: Insights from Valencia

by Sarah Stephen in An ecological oratorio

http://www.researchblogging.org"> alt="ResearchBlogging.org" src="http://www.researchblogging.org/public/citation_icons/rb2_large_gray.png" style="border:0;"/>Visiting the city of Valencia in Spain for the first time, we were pleasantly greeted by the subtle aroma of orange blossoms in the air and the sight of beautiful oranges dangling from the orange trees that line the street pavements. Whilst many parts of the city are bordered with trees, there are also other green spaces,  ........ Read more »

Searle, S., Turnbull, M., Boelman, N., Schuster, W., Yakir, D., & Griffin, K. (2012) Urban environment of New York City promotes growth in northern red oak seedlings. Tree Physiology, 32(4), 389-400. DOI: 10.1093/treephys/tps027  

  • April 20, 2015
  • 03:36 PM
  • 18 views

Black hole hunters tackle a cosmic conundrum

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

While mass media was busy misquoting Stephen Hawking and arguing about black holes, astrophysicists have been hard at work trying to solve still unanswered questions about them. Now a team has not only proven that a supermassive black hole exists in a place where it isn’t supposed to be, but in doing so have opened a new door to what things were like in the early universe.... Read more »

Thomas J. Whalen, Ryan C. Hickox, Amy E. Reines, Jenny E. Greene, Gregory R. Sivakoff, Kelsey E. Johnson, David M. Alexander, & Andy D. Goulding. (2015) Variable Hard X-ray Emission from the Candidate Accreting Black Hole in Dwarf Galaxy Henize 2-10. The Astrophysical journal . arXiv: 1504.03331v1

  • April 20, 2015
  • 02:23 PM
  • 25 views

Miracle fat-burning hormone doesn't exist after all

by Isabel Torres in Science in the clouds

Scientists are humans, and as such, they can sometimes get carried away when they make a breakthrough discovery. Because of this premature excitement, they may lose attention to detail, over-interpret results, or cut corners to speed up that much-desired Nature publication. The discovery of irisin, or ‘exercise hormone’, is one such example. Once thought to be a promising exercise-free solution for obesity and diabetes, irisin has now been shown to be no more than a random blood protein dete........ Read more »

Albrecht Elke, Bernd Thiede, Torgeir Holen, Tomoo Ohashi, Lisa Schering, Sindre Lee, Julia Brenmoehl, Selina Thomas, Christian A. Drevon, & Harold P. Erickson. (2015) Irisin – a myth rather than an exercise-inducible myokine. Scientific Reports, 8889. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/srep08889  

  • April 20, 2015
  • 11:39 AM
  • 20 views

The Human Epigenome Roadmap

by Daniel Koboldt in Massgenomics

Aside from the occasional somatic mutation, the genome of every cell in an individual’s body is largely preserved. Yet different types of cells (and tissues, and organs) are incredibly diverse. The majority of that specialization is governed by epigenetic changes — histone modifications, DNA accessibility, and methylation — that influence when and how genes are expressed. […]... Read more »

Roadmap Epigenomics Consortium, Kundaje A, Meuleman W, Ernst J, Bilenky M, Yen A, Heravi-Moussavi A, Kheradpour P, Zhang Z, Wang J.... (2015) Integrative analysis of 111 reference human epigenomes. Nature, 518(7539), 317-30. PMID: 25693563  

  • April 20, 2015
  • 11:32 AM
  • 25 views

ADHD and Autism Overlap: Adult Twin Study

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

Clinical studies show high rates of ADHD in adults with autism or autism spectrum disorder (ASD). These studies have estimated the prevalence of ADHD in adults with ASD at between 28 and 44% of individuals. The prevalence of ADHD in the adult general population without ASD is estimated at 2.5%.Given the overlap between these two developmental disorders, it makes sense to examine genetic factors that might contribute to co-occurrence.TJC Polderman along with colleagues from the Netherlands, ........ Read more »

  • April 20, 2015
  • 09:45 AM
  • 20 views

Aphasia factors vs. subtypes

by Dan Mirman in Minding the Brain

One of the interesting things (to me anyway) that came out of our recent factor analysis project (Mirman et al., 2015, in press; see Part 1 and Part 2) is a way of reconsidering aphasia types in terms of psycholinguistic factors rather than the traditional clinical aphasia subtypes. The traditional aphasia subtyping approach is to use a diagnostic test like the Western Aphasia Battery or the Boston Diagnostic Aphasia Examination to assign an individual with aphasia to one of several subtype cate........ Read more »

Mirman, D., Chen, Q., Zhang, Y., Wang, Z., Faseyitan, O.K., Coslett, H.B., & Schwartz, M.F. (2015) Neural Organization of Spoken Language Revealed by Lesion-Symptom Mapping. Nature Communications, 6(6762), 1-9. info:/

  • April 20, 2015
  • 04:51 AM
  • 28 views

Tics are common in adults with autism

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

The title of this post comes from a quote included in the paper by Ursula Kahl and colleagues [1] based on their study of the "phenomenology and characteristics" of tics in adults diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) compared with a small control group of adults with Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS). A tic by the way, is a "sudden, fast, repeated movement or sound."This is not the first time that tics have been examined with the autism spectrum in mind. The paper from C........ Read more »

Kahl, U., Schunke, O., Schöttle, D., David, N., Brandt, V., Bäumer, T., Roessner, V., Münchau, A., & Ganos, C. (2015) Tic Phenomenology and Tic Awareness in Adults With Autism. Movement Disorders Clinical Practice. DOI: 10.1002/mdc3.12154  

  • April 20, 2015
  • 04:35 AM
  • 27 views

Males Are Here To Stay: Sex Enhances Egg Production And Colony Fitness

by beredim in Strange Animals

To us humans, it seems extremely unnatural that other animals can reproduce without having sex. Yet with the passing of time, evolution has endowed females of several species of amphibians, insects, reptiles and fish the ability to asexually produce offsprings without "help" from males.



Now, researchers at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) say that in ... Read more »

  • April 20, 2015
  • 12:05 AM
  • 24 views

Delayed Onset of Concussion Symptoms may Predict Delayed Recovery in Young Athletes

by Kathleen Cummer in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Delayed onset of symptoms after sport-related concussion puts young athletes at a 20.7 times greater risk for postconcussion syndrome... Read more »

  • April 19, 2015
  • 05:29 PM
  • 49 views

Accepting pain – or are we measuring something else?

by Bronwyn Thompson in Healthskills: Skills for Healthy Living

Acceptance is defined in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) as “a willingness to remain in contact with and to actively experience particular private experiences (Hayes, Jacobson, Follette, Dougher, 1994) (eds): Acceptance and Change: Content and Context in Psychotherapy. Reno, Context Press, 1994), and from this Lance McCracken and colleagues developed the Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire. This measure has two dimensions: willingness to experience pain and engaging in values-dir........ Read more »

  • April 19, 2015
  • 03:23 PM
  • 32 views

Aphid flight trends follow climate change: a fifty years long analysis!

by Mauro Mandrioli in The aphid room

I started to find now on different crops near Modena the first aphid populations… it is not too early neither too late… in respect to the last years. However, it seems that in Italy we started to have aphids earlier on our plants in the last years. Interestingly, a recent papers clearly assessed this trend … Continue reading Aphid flight trends follow climate change: a fifty years long analysis!... Read more »

  • April 19, 2015
  • 01:49 PM
  • 47 views

Botox makes unnerving journey into our nervous system

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

New research might bring a frown to even the most heavily botoxed faces, with scientists finding how some of the potent toxin used for cosmetic surgery escapes into the central nervous system. Researchers have shown how Botox – also known as Botulinum neurotoxin serotype A – is transported via our nerves back to the central nervous system.... Read more »

Wang, T., Martin, S., Papadopulos, A., Harper, C., Mavlyutov, T., Niranjan, D., Glass, N., Cooper-White, J., Sibarita, J., Choquet, D.... (2015) Control of Autophagosome Axonal Retrograde Flux by Presynaptic Activity Unveiled Using Botulinum Neurotoxin Type A. Journal of Neuroscience, 35(15), 6179-6194. DOI: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.3757-14.2015  

  • April 18, 2015
  • 07:24 PM
  • 70 views

Introducing Lassa-VSV, a hybrid virus that kills brain tumours

by Betty Zou in Eat, Read, Science

In a paper published this past week in the Journal of Virology, researchers at Yale University and Harvard University tried to overcome the neurotoxicity of VSV by engineering a hybrid virus. The researchers wanted to know if swapping out the G protein of VSV with the G protein from another virus would lessen the harmful effects of VSV on the brain while maintaining its tumour-killing abilities.... Read more »

Wollmann G, Drokhlyansky E, Cepko C, & van den Pol AN. (2015) Lassa-VSV chimeric virus safely destroys brain tumors. Journal of virology. PMID: 25878115  

  • April 18, 2015
  • 02:14 PM
  • 57 views

Kids with ADHD must squirm to learn

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

For decades, frustrated parents and teachers have barked at fidgety children with ADHD to “Sit still and concentrate!” But new research shows that if you want ADHD kids to learn, you have to let them squirm. The foot-tapping, leg-swinging and chair-scooting movements of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder are actually vital to how they remember information and work out complex cognitive tasks.... Read more »

  • April 18, 2015
  • 08:00 AM
  • 62 views

Is There Signal in the fMRI Noise?

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

A new paper in Neuroimage suggests that methods for removing head motion and physiological noise from fMRI data might be inadvertently excluding real signal as well.

The authors, Molly G. Bright and Kevin Murphy of Cardiff, studied the technique called nuisance regression. It's a popular approach for removing fMRI noise. Noise reduction is important because factors such as head movement, the heart beat, and breathing, can contaminate the fMRI signal and lead to biased results. Nuisance regres... Read more »

  • April 18, 2015
  • 05:22 AM
  • 61 views

Autistic traits in adult-onset psychiatric disorders?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"To conclude, the presentation of ALTs [autistic-like traits/symptoms] at the sub-threshold or threshold level may be closely associated with BPD [bipolar disorder] and SZ [schizophrenia]."That was the conclusion reached in the paper by Junko Matsuo and colleagues [1] (open-access here) based on their analysis of nearly 300 adults aged between 25-59 years including those diagnosed with "MDD [major depressive disorder], n=125; bipolar disorder, n=56; schizophrenia,&n........ Read more »

Matsuo J, Kamio Y, Takahashi H, Ota M, Teraishi T, Hori H, Nagashima A, Takei R, Higuchi T, Motohashi N.... (2015) Autistic-Like Traits in Adult Patients with Mood Disorders and Schizophrenia. PloS one, 10(4). PMID: 25838109  

  • April 18, 2015
  • 04:45 AM
  • 63 views

Major Advance in Artificial Photosynthesis

by Perikis Livas in Chilon

A potentially game-changing breakthrough in artificial photosynthesis has been achieved with the development of a system that can capture carbon dioxide emissions before they are vented into the atmosphere and then, powered by solar energy, convert that carbon dioxide into valuable chemical products, including biodegradable plastics, pharmaceutical drugs and even liquid fuels.... Read more »

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