Post List

  • January 28, 2015
  • 03:08 PM
  • 0 views

Everyday chemical exposure leads to early menopause

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Seems like everything is killing us these days. Well ladies, you have one more thing that is causing you problems. New research has shown that women whose bodies have high levels of chemicals found in plastics, personal-care products, common household items and the environment experience menopause two to four years earlier than women with lower […]... Read more »

Grindler, N., Allsworth, J., Macones, G., Kannan, K., Roehl, K., & Cooper, A. (2015) Persistent Organic Pollutants and Early Menopause in U.S. Women. PLOS ONE, 10(1). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0116057  

  • January 28, 2015
  • 02:08 PM
  • 2 views

Diverse Herpes Viruses Share Ability To Suppress Immune Response

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Christopher S. Sullivan, Ph.D. Associate Professor Dept. Molecular Biosciences The University of Texas at Austin and Jennifer Cox, lead author Graduate student in Dr. Sullivan’s laboratory. Jennifer Cox’s Replies: MedicalResearch: What is the background for this study? … Continue reading →
The post Diverse Herpes Viruses Share Ability To Suppress Immune Response appeared first on Med........ Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, Christopher S. Sullivan, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Dept. Molecular Biosciences, The University of Texas at Austin and, Jennifer Cox, lead author Graduate student in Dr. Sullivan’s laboratory., Jennifer Cox, lead author, & Graduate student in Dr. Sullivan's lab. (2015) Diverse Herpes Viruses Share Ability To Suppress Immune Response. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • January 28, 2015
  • 01:45 PM
  • 2 views

Does this mean we need to pay no attention to 1 in  10 research findings?

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

If so, we can certainly suggest a few to be disregarded! We don’t write about most of the articles we consider for this blog (the reject pile grows taller every day). And when we do write about questionable pieces we let you know if we think it’s a little ridiculous or if it’s a prospective […]

Related posts:
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It’s 2014: Where are all the female subjects in surgical research? ........ Read more »

  • January 28, 2015
  • 01:01 PM
  • 1 view

Some visual-form areas are really task areas

by Janet Kwasniak in Neuro-patch

There are two paths for visual information, one to the motor areas (dorsal ‘where’ stream) and one to the areas concerned with consciousness, memory and cognition (ventral ‘what’ stream). The visual ventral stream has areas for the recognition of various categories of object: faces, body parts, letters for example. But are these areas really ‘visual’ […]... Read more »

Abboud, S., Maidenbaum, S., Dehaene, S., & Amedi, A. (2015) A number-form area in the blind. Nature Communications, 6026. DOI: 10.1038/ncomms7026  

  • January 28, 2015
  • 12:48 PM
  • 3 views

Retinal Artery Occlusion Linked To Increased Risk Of Acute Coronary Syndrome

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Ren-Long Jan Department of Pediatrics, Chi Mei Medical Center, Liouying, Tainan, Taiwan Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan. Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? … Continue reading →
The post Retinal Artery Occlusion Linked To Increased Risk Of Acute Coronary Syndrome appeared first on Medical........ Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Ren-Long Jan, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwa. (2015) Retinal Artery Occlusion Linked To Increased Risk Of Acute Coronary Syndrome . MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • January 28, 2015
  • 12:24 PM
  • 2 views

Carotid Atherosclerosis Predicted by Cholesterol-Overloaded HDL Particles

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dong Zhao MD.PhD Deputy Director & Professor Beijing Institute of Heart,Lung & Blood Vessel Diseases Capital Medical University Beijing Anzhen Hospital Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Dong … Continue reading →
The post Carotid Atherosclerosis Predicted by Cholesterol-Overloaded HDL Particles appeared first on MedicalResearch.co........ Read more »

Interview with Dong Zhao MD.PhD. (2015) Carotid Atherosclerosis Predicted by Cholesterol-Overloaded HDL Particles. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • January 28, 2015
  • 09:30 AM
  • 12 views

Whose Culture is it Anyway? Disentangling Culture and Eating Disorders - Part 4

by Andrea in Science of Eating Disorders

The more I write about culture and eating disorders, the more I want to know. I keep finding more articles to add to the mix; I know I’m far from the first to be interested in how culture and eating disorders intersect, and for that matter, what counts as “culture.” Still, this has been a fascinating exploration so far! In case you're curious, this is to be the second last post in the series for now at least. There will be one more after this, about eating disorders in Gha........ Read more »

  • January 28, 2015
  • 08:38 AM
  • 13 views

Video Tip of the Week: Helium plant pedigree software, because “Plants are weird.”

by Mary in OpenHelix

A lot of people find our blog by searching for “pedigree” tools. We’ve covered them in the past, and we’ve got some training on the Madeline 2.0 web tools that we like. We have groused about the fact that some pedigree tools do not accommodate same-sex families. Largely focused on human relationships, there are a […]... Read more »

Shaw Paul D, Jessie Kennedy, Iain Milne, & David F Marshall. (2014) Helium: visualization of large scale plant pedigrees. BMC Bioinformatics, 15(1), 259. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2105-15-259  

  • January 28, 2015
  • 08:30 AM
  • 6 views

How Can We Improve Working Dog Programs?

by CAPB in Companion Animal Psychology Blog

A new paper suggests ways to develop the welfare and performance of working canines.A search-and-rescue dog takes part in a training exerciseHave you ever stopped to think about the amazing variety of jobs that dogs do: herding sheep, chasing criminals, sniffing out cancer, assisting people with disabilities, supporting the military in the field, detecting explosives or narcotics, visiting sick people in hospital, pulling sleds, search and rescue, and so on. They bring a wide variety of ski........ Read more »

  • January 28, 2015
  • 08:00 AM
  • 15 views

Crawling To The Top

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

Nematodes cause horrible diseases, but they way they reproduce is the most fascinating thing about them. Their sperm aren’t shaped like typical animal male gametes. They crawl instead of swimming, and they have a type of cytoskeleton not seen in any other cell type on Earth. Yet, the nematode is the most numerous type of animal on Earth.... Read more »

Smith HE. (2014) Nematode sperm motility. WormBook : the online review of C. elegans biology, 1-15. PMID: 24715710  

H. Ferris. (2009) The beer mat nematode, Panagrellus The beer mat nematode, Panagrellus redivivus: A study of the connectedness of scientific discovery . J. Nematode Morphol. Syst., 12(1), 19-25. info:/

McKnight, K., Hoang, H., Prasain, J., Brown, N., Vibbert, J., Hollister, K., Moore, R., Ragains, J., Reese, J., & Miller, M. (2014) Neurosensory Perception of Environmental Cues Modulates Sperm Motility Critical for Fertilization. Science, 344(6185), 754-757. DOI: 10.1126/science.1250598  

  • January 28, 2015
  • 07:48 AM
  • 15 views

Transcription caught on camera part 2: Fab-ulous Histones

by Gal Haimovich in Green Fluorescent Blog

In eukaryotes, the DNA is packages tightly in nucleosomes, which are composed primarily out of histone proteins. There are four major types of histones (1,2,3 & 4). Extensive work has been done on how histones facilitate and regulate transcription. It … Continue reading →... Read more »

Stasevich TJ, Hayashi-Takanaka Y, Sato Y, Maehara K, Ohkawa Y, Sakata-Sogawa K, Tokunaga M, Nagase T, Nozaki N, McNally JG.... (2014) Regulation of RNA polymerase II activation by histone acetylation in single living cells. Nature, 516(7530), 272-5. PMID: 25252976  

  • January 28, 2015
  • 06:22 AM
  • 12 views

Was Lucy A Riveter? News On Tool Use

by jeffrey daniels in United Academics

British researchers were looking at the trabecular bones of several Australopithecus africanus fossils, and comparing them to the known bone shapes of chimpanzees and humans. Their results seems to suggest that A africanus was at the very least making much use of stone tools, and there could even be a possibility that they were creating their own tools as well.... Read more »

Skinner MM, Stephens NB, Tsegai ZJ, Foote AC, Nguyen NH, Gross T, Pahr DH, Hublin JJ, & Kivell TL. (2015) Human evolution. Human-like hand use in Australopithecus africanus. Science (New York, N.Y.), 347(6220), 395-9. PMID: 25613885  

  • January 28, 2015
  • 05:03 AM
  • 14 views

Urinary histidine as a marker of 'dioxin-induced' neurodevelopmental issues?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

The paper by Muneko Nishijo and colleagues [1] (open-access) caught my eye recently and their continuing investigations into the potential effects of perinatal dioxin exposure on offspring neurodevelopmental outcomes. For a bit of background on this initiative based in Vietnam, I would refer readers to a previous post on this blog (see here).Your weakness is copper? Y-you're kidding right?In case you can't be bothered to follow that previous link, the idea was that exposure to TCDD [2,........ Read more »

  • January 28, 2015
  • 12:05 AM
  • 11 views

ACL Graft Type May Not Matter When Attempting to Improve Patient-Reported Outcome 2-Years Post-Surgery

by Nicole Cattano in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Three anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction techniques yield similar patient-reported and objective outcomes for up to 2 years after surgery. The one exception was joint laxity, which was better among patients who received a patellar tendon autograft instead of one of two hamstring techniques.... Read more »

  • January 27, 2015
  • 02:58 PM
  • 25 views

Scientific Sherlocks: The Case of the Imperial Pheasant

by Jente Ottenburghs in Evolutionary Stories

In 1923, Jean Delacour discovered a new species of Pheasant in Vietnam. But things were not as they seemed...... Read more »

  • January 27, 2015
  • 01:55 PM
  • 31 views

Your brain is hardening your arteries, but not on purpose!

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Your brain might just be killing you slowly. Atherosclerosis — or hardening and narrowing of the arteries — can be caused by fat buildup that causes plaque deposits, and is one of the main causes of cardiovascular disease. What does that have to do with the brain? Well new research has shown a link between how the brain regulates fat metabolism, which has the potential of stopping the development of this disease risk factor in obesity and diabetes.... Read more »

  • January 27, 2015
  • 10:48 AM
  • 33 views

Reuse of Cemeteries in Prehistoric Ireland

by Katy Meyers Emery in Bones Don't Lie

With the cold weather and ice descending upon the Midwest, I’ve found myself spending more time watching HGTV than I normally do. My favorite shows are the fixer upper ones, […]... Read more »

  • January 27, 2015
  • 10:44 AM
  • 37 views

How do we integrate information?

by neuroecology in Neuroecology

Left or right? Apple or orange? Selma or Birdman? One way to make these decisions is precisely what intuition tell us it should be: we weigh up the pros and cons of each choice. Then, when we have sufficient evidence for one over the … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • January 27, 2015
  • 10:27 AM
  • 24 views

Athletic Training Makes Lizards Better Runners

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish



Athletes don't normally need to be chased down the track to get their training mileage in. But a green anole lizard is not a normal athlete.

Scientists wanted to know whether it's possible to train a lizard at all. Human athletes and other mammals perform better with consistent exercise, but is this universal? Can a reptile increase its stamina? What about its sprint speed? So the scientists became lizard athletic trainers, which really means lizard harassers. Results were mixed.

The g... Read more »

  • January 27, 2015
  • 10:12 AM
  • 25 views

The importance of protecting aquifers from contaminated plumes

by Ruth Garcia de la Calle in ADVOCATE Marie Curie Network

This post shows us an overview how Permeable Reactive Barriers (PRBs) for in situ sustainable groundwater remediation might be used as low cost alternative to clean up the groundwater... Read more »

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