Post List

  • July 17, 2015
  • 09:26 AM
  • 103 views

Here It Is: The World's Oldest Sperm

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish



Doesn't look a day over 40 million, right? This fossilized sperm and its compatriots turned up in a 50-million-year-old worm cocoon in Antarctica. And it has some pretty exciting implications for scientists—aside from the obvious news that we're looking at a loser of an eons-old swimming race.

Ordinarily, squishy worms don't wriggle into the fossil record. Their boneless bodies tend to disappear from history, just like the soft parts of animals with skeletons. That's why scientists don........ Read more »

Bomfleur, B., Mörs, T., Ferraguti, M., Reguero, M., & McLoughlin, S. (2015) Fossilized spermatozoa preserved in a 50-Myr-old annelid cocoon from Antarctica. Biology Letters, 11(7), 20150431. DOI: 10.1098/rsbl.2015.0431  

  • July 17, 2015
  • 09:12 AM
  • 76 views

Antidepressants Plus NSAIDS May Increase Risk of Bleeding in Brain

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Byung-Joo Park, MD, MPH, PhD Professor Department of Preventive Medicine Seoul National University College of Medicine Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: Antidepressants and NSAIDs are each thought … Continue reading →
The post Antidepressants Plus NSAIDS May Increase Risk of Bleeding in Brain appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

Byung-Joo Park, MD, MPH, PhD. (2015) Antidepressants Plus NSAIDS May Increase Risk of Bleeding in Brain. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • July 17, 2015
  • 09:02 AM
  • 88 views

5% of US Population Accounts For 50% of Health Care Costs

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

  MedicalResearch.com Interview with: H. Joanna Jiang, Ph.D. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality MedicalResearch: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Jiang: A large proportion of health care resources in the United States … Continue reading →
The post 5% of US Population Accounts For 50% of Health Care Costs appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

H. Joanna Jiang, Ph.D. (2015) 5% of US Population Accounts For 50% of Health Care Costs. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • July 17, 2015
  • 09:00 AM
  • 27 views

Distinct roles for VHL and hypoxia in RCC gene expression and metabolism

by Danielle Stevenson in BHD Research Blog

As discussed in last week’s blog renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cells show altered metabolism favouring lactate fermentation as the major energy source. Such metabolic changes can be a response to hypoxia or mutations in genes, such as VHL, that disrupt HIFα-proteasomal degradation. HIF signalling, directly and indirectly, regulates over 2% of human genes including those involved in angiogenesis, survival, proliferation and metabolism (Manalo et al., 2005). Hypoxia and VHL-loss are gene........ Read more »

  • July 17, 2015
  • 07:51 AM
  • 71 views

Combination Targeted Therapy Promising For Difficult Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr Yeow Tee Goh MBBS Department of Haematology Singapore General Hospital Republic of Singapore Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Goh: Relapsed or refractory peripheral T-cell lymphoma after … Continue reading →
The post Combination Targeted Therapy Promising For Difficult Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

Dr Yeow Tee Goh MBBS. (2015) Combination Targeted Therapy Promising For Difficult Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • July 17, 2015
  • 07:30 AM
  • 63 views

Health Lifestyle Reduces Risk of Atrial Fibrillation

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Carl “Chip”  Lavie MD, FACC FACP, FCCP Medical  Director, Cardiac  Rehabilitation and Prevention Director, Exercise Laboratories John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute Professor of Medicine Ochsner Clinical  School-UQ School of Medicine Editor-in-Chief, Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases Medical … Continue reading →
The post Health Lifestyle Reduces Risk of Atrial Fibrillation appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Resear........ Read more »

Carl "Chip" Lavie MD, FACC FACP, FCCP. (2015) Health Lifestyle Reduces Risk of Atrial Fibrillation. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • July 17, 2015
  • 07:07 AM
  • 55 views

Genetic Testing Can Detect, Protect Patients Prone To Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: John A. Elefteriades, MD William W.L. Glenn Professor of Surgery Chief of Cardiothoracic Surgery Director, Aortic Institute at Yale-New Haven Yale University School of Medicine Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the … Continue reading →
The post Genetic Testing Can Detect, Protect Patients Prone To Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

John A. Elefteriades, MD. (2015) Genetic Testing Can Detect, Protect Patients Prone To Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • July 17, 2015
  • 07:02 AM
  • 90 views

Qui Tam: What if the whistleblower is the lawyer? 

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

We’ve worked on several qui tam cases where mock jurors have been suspicious of the motivations for the whistleblower given the huge amounts of money they stand to make. So what if the whistleblower is the [current or former] lawyer? There’s a really interesting article in SSRN on the ethical issues surrounding lawyers blowing whistles. […]

Related posts:
Predicting case outcomes? Lawyers are pretty dismal at it!
False Confessions: “No one really does that unless they’re just stu........ Read more »

  • July 17, 2015
  • 04:41 AM
  • 103 views

Diagnosing autism: not to be sniffed at

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

All rights to Rozenkrantz et al (2015)'Sniffing could provide autism test' went the BBC headline as the work of Liron Rozenkrantz and colleagues [1] (open-access available here) provided some media fodder and with it ideas "implying a mechanistic link between the underpinnings of olfaction and ASD [autism spectrum disorder] and directly linking an impaired IAM [internal action model] with impaired social abilities."Looking at the sniff response in 36 children - 18 with a........ Read more »

Rozenkrantz, L., Zachor, D., Heller, I., Plotkin, A., Weissbrod, A., Snitz, K., Secundo, L., & Sobel, N. (2015) A Mechanistic Link between Olfaction and Autism Spectrum Disorder. Current Biology. DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2015.05.048  

  • July 16, 2015
  • 10:42 PM
  • 36 views

Cost-Effective Clinical Pathway Determined Hospitalized Patients’ Risk of Sleep Apnea

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Sunil Sharma, M.D Associate professor of pulmonary medicine Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Sharma: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a … Continue reading →
The post Cost-Effective Clinical Pathway Determined Hospitalized Patients’ Risk of Sleep Apnea appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
........ Read more »

Sunil Sharma, M.D. (2015) Cost-Effective Clinical Pathway Determined Hospitalized Patients' Risk of Sleep Apnea. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • July 16, 2015
  • 09:59 PM
  • 29 views

Acne Causing Bacteria Killed By Nitric Oxide Generated From Nanoparticles

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Adam Friedman, MD, FAAD Associate Professor of Dermatology Residency Program Director Director of Translational Research Department of Dermatology George Washington School of Medicine and Health Sciences Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are … Continue reading →
The post Acne Causing Bacteria Killed By Nitric Oxide Generated From Nanoparticles appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

Adam Friedman, MD, FAAD. (2015) Acne Causing Bacteria Killed By Nitric Oxide Generated From Nanoparticles. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • July 16, 2015
  • 08:43 PM
  • 32 views

Space Station Provides Ideal Environment For Study of Multiple Medical Research Issues

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Patrick O’Neill CASIS Communications Manager and Tara Ruttley Ph.D. NASA Staff Scientist NASA Office of the Chief Scientist Editor’s note: CASIS, the four year old Center for the Advancement of Science in Space, presented an informative update … Continue reading →
The post Space Station Provides Ideal Environment For Study of Multiple Medical Research Issues appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

Interview with:Patrick O’Neill, CASIS Communications Manager and, & Tara Ruttley Ph.D. NASA. (2015) Space Station Provides Ideal Environment For Study of Multiple Medical Research Issues. MedicalResearch.com. info:/http://medicalresearch.com/author-interviews/space-station-…esearch-issues/15584

  • July 16, 2015
  • 07:41 PM
  • 36 views

Can a Low Methionine Diet Starve Triple-Negative Breast Cancer?

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Vincent L. Cryns MD Chief of the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism Department of Medicine University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health Madison, Wisconsin Medical Research: What … Continue reading →
The post Can a Low Methionine Diet Starve Triple-Negative Breast Cancer? appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

Dr. Vincent L. Cryns MD. (2015) Can a Low Methionine Diet Starve Triple-Negative Breast Cancer?. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • July 16, 2015
  • 06:24 PM
  • 97 views

Hydraulic fracturing and hospitalization: a tentative link

by Jonathan Trinastic in Goodnight Earth

There is little hard data bout how fracking affects health outcomes, but a new study provides a first glimpse at a correlation between increased well-drilling and inpatient rates. Read more here!... Read more »

Jemielita, T., Gerton, G., Neidell, M., Chillrud, S., Yan, B., Stute, M., Howarth, M., Saberi, P., Fausti, N., Penning, T.... (2015) Unconventional Gas and Oil Drilling Is Associated with Increased Hospital Utilization Rates. PLOS ONE, 10(7). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0131093  

  • July 16, 2015
  • 04:58 PM
  • 105 views

Women and fragrances: Scents and sensitivity

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Researchers have sniffed out an unspoken rule among women when it comes to fragrances: Women don’t buy perfume for other women, and they certainly don’t share them. Like boyfriends, current fragrance choices are hands off, forbidden–neither touch, nor smell. You can look, but that’s all, says BYU industrial design professor and study coauthor Bryan Howell.... Read more »

  • July 16, 2015
  • 11:04 AM
  • 70 views

How have we never talked about knapweed before???

by Kathryn Turner in Alien Plantation

Wow, sorry folks, I’ve been slacking, and that whole PhD thing is a sorry excuse! Let me tell you a little natural history about a plant called diffuse knapweed (Centaurea diffusa), the  Dr. Moriarty to my Sherlock Holmes. The system … Continue reading →... Read more »

Thompson, D., & Stout, D. (1991) Duration of the juvenile period in diffuse knapweed. Canadian Journal of Botany, 69(2), 368-371. DOI: 10.1139/b91-050  

  • July 16, 2015
  • 07:45 AM
  • 83 views

How to Succeed at Clinical Genome Sequencing

by Daniel Koboldt in Massgenomics

Whole-genome sequencing holds enormous potential to improve the diagnosis and treatment of human diseases. Although this approach is the only way to capture the complete spectrum of genetic variation, its application in clinical settings has been slow compared to more targeted strategies (i.e. panel and exome sequencing). Everyone talks about cost as the main contributing factor for […]... Read more »

Taylor JC, Martin HC, Lise S, Broxholme J, Cazier JB, Rimmer A, Kanapin A, Lunter G, Fiddy S, Allan C.... (2015) Factors influencing success of clinical genome sequencing across a broad spectrum of disorders. Nature genetics, 47(7), 717-26. PMID: 25985138  

  • July 16, 2015
  • 06:07 AM
  • 81 views

Psychologists asked these skin cancer patients to draw their melanomas

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

Early diagnosis of cancer can save lives, yet so many people wait before reporting important symptoms. This is an issue where psychology can make a major contribution by helping to explain why some patients delay reporting their symptoms to a clinician. A pilot study published recently in Psychology and Health uses an unusual approach for this purpose, specifically in the context of skin cancer, by asking patients to draw their melanomas.Suzanne Scott at Kings College, London and her collea........ Read more »

  • July 16, 2015
  • 04:51 AM
  • 89 views

Oxytocin moving on: ADHD and inattentiveness

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Dare I mention the term 'cuddle hormone' when it comes to oxytocin?Well, according to a recent news piece in Nature (see here), the 'cuddle hormone' days of oxytocin might well be numbered as science is starting to come to grips with just how complicated a role this hormone might have when it comes to biology and behaviour. Of course we've seen hints of this for quite a while now as autism research in particular comes to grips with the idea that oxytocin may not be the magic 'sociability' b........ Read more »

Sasaki, T., Hashimoto, K., Oda, Y., Ishima, T., Kurata, T., Takahashi, J., Kamata, Y., Kimura, H., Niitsu, T., Komatsu, H.... (2015) Decreased levels of serum oxytocin in pediatric Patients with attention deficit / hyperactivity disorder. Psychiatry Research. DOI: 10.1016/j.psychres.2015.05.029  

  • July 15, 2015
  • 11:07 PM
  • 79 views

Element breath!

by Rosin Cerate in Rosin Cerate

Exposure to relatively toxic metals and metalloids can result in a wide range of symptoms, some of which are pretty weird. Body parts can change colour, skin can erupt with lesions, bones can soften, hair can be shed, the nervous system can go haywire, and the smell of one's breath can transition from unnoticeable to downright peculiar.Long-term exposure to lead (e.g. working at a lead mine or smelter) can cause your breath to acquire a strange sweetish metallic smell, particularly in the mornin........ Read more »

Nuttall KL. (2006) Evaluating selenium poisoning. Annals of Clinical and Laboratory Science, 36(4), 409-20. PMID: 17127727  

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