Post List

  • April 13, 2016
  • 09:36 AM
  • 178 views

Video Tip of the Week: Branch, a web-based tool offering decision trees for data analysis

by Mary in OpenHelix

Recently I highlighted a decision tree tool for experimental design. EDA, or Experimental Design Assistant, helps you to plan your experiment, choose the approrpiate groups and numbers you’ll need. Set some variables, etc. This week’s video also offers decision trees–but these help you to evaluate the data from your studies of interest instead. Branch is a […]... Read more »

  • April 13, 2016
  • 07:10 AM
  • 172 views

Ivy League Climber

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

English ivy doesn’t send out entwining tendrils, it doesn’t burrow into cracks as an anchor. It doesn’t have hooked thorns like a climbing rose – no, English ivy can grow up the side of Wrigley Field because its millions of adventitious roots secrete the strongest glue in the world. However, it doesn’t work like most glues – it works like a gecko’s feet. Oh, and it will help protect you from skin cancer too!... Read more »

  • April 13, 2016
  • 07:02 AM
  • 52 views

Bias against mixed race people depends on where you  live

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

Here’s a somewhat predictable but still disturbing finding: If you live in an area where you are not exposed to other races—those of mixed race are confusing to you and that confusion leads to bias against anyone of mixed race. At least confusion is better than outrage—which is what greeted the makers of Cheerios cereal […]

Related posts:
Who is multiracial? Apparently, it depends on how you ask… 
Playing the race card: When it works and why it doesn’t
So we cannot talk about........ Read more »

  • April 13, 2016
  • 06:42 AM
  • 184 views

What does an ambivalent mood do to your problem-solving skills?

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

Psychologists have got a pretty good picture of how we’re influenced by the big emotional states. Feeling positive encourages an explorative cognitive style that is risk-tolerant and well suited to the open aspects of creativity, whereas negative emotions make us sensitive to threat and prone to vigilant, focused thinking. But what happens when our emotional states are a mix of the two – when we’re in an ambivalent mood? Appropriately, research to date has been inconsistent, with some work........ Read more »

  • April 13, 2016
  • 04:30 AM
  • 160 views

Younger Patients or Those with a Meniscal Tear are More Likely to have ACL Surgery

by Nicole Cattano in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

A patient who is young or has a meniscal injury is more likely to have an anterior cruciate ligament surgery (either early or delayed). ... Read more »

  • April 13, 2016
  • 03:25 AM
  • 175 views

Vitamin D deficiency and psychosis

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

In amongst my various ramblings about how vitamin D - the sunshine vitamin/hormone - might show more than a few connections to conditions/labels outside of just the English disease (see here), I've covered some science on a possible connection with psychosis (see here) and schizophrenia (see here). There are still gaps in terms of the hows and whys of vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency when it comes to this area of psychiatry, but I believe there is enough science in this area to initially w........ Read more »

Lally, J., Gardner-Sood, P., Firdosi, M., Iyegbe, C., Stubbs, B., Greenwood, K., Murray, R., Smith, S., Howes, O., & Gaughran, F. (2016) Clinical correlates of vitamin D deficiency in established psychosis. BMC Psychiatry, 16(1). DOI: 10.1186/s12888-016-0780-2  

  • April 12, 2016
  • 10:00 PM
  • 124 views

Mating Oddities of the Southern Blue-Ringed Octopus

by Emily Makowski in Sextraordinary!

I discuss some unique characteristics of octopus mating and describe a recent article on the Southern blue-ringed octopus.... Read more »

  • April 12, 2016
  • 07:18 PM
  • 210 views

The scientific brain: How the brain repurposes itself to learn scientific concepts

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

The human brain was initially used for basic survival tasks, such as staying safe and hunting and gathering. Yet, 200,000 years later, the same human brain is able to learn abstract concepts, like momentum, energy, and gravity, which have only been formally defined in the last few centuries. New research has now uncovered how the brain is able to acquire brand new types of ideas.
... Read more »

Robert A. Mason, & Marcel Adam Just. (2016) Neural Representations of Physics Concepts . Psychological Science. info:other/Pre-print

  • April 12, 2016
  • 06:11 PM
  • 168 views

Cleaning work: a stepping-stone or a dead-end job for migrants?

by Maiju Strommer in Language on the Move

Let me at once introduce you to the main character of this blog post: Kifibin. He is a Ugandan man...... Read more »

  • April 12, 2016
  • 05:00 PM
  • 128 views

Dr. Kudenchuk is Misrepresenting ALPS as 'Significant'

by Rogue Medic in Rogue Medic

This study was very well done, but it was not designed to provide valid information about the effects of amiodarone or lidocaine on witnessed arrests or on EMS Witnessed arrests. Maybe the authors were overconfident.

In resuscitation research, we have abundant evidence that overconfidence is much more common than improvements in outcomes.... Read more »

Kudenchuk, P., Brown, S., Daya, M., Rea, T., Nichol, G., Morrison, L., Leroux, B., Vaillancourt, C., Wittwer, L., Callaway, C.... (2016) Amiodarone, Lidocaine, or Placebo in Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest. New England Journal of Medicine. DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1514204  

Glover BM, Brown SP, Morrison L, Davis D, Kudenchuk PJ, Van Ottingham L, Vaillancourt C, Cheskes S, Atkins DL, Dorian P.... (2012) Wide variability in drug use in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: A report from the resuscitation outcomes consortium. Resuscitation. PMID: 22858552  

  • April 12, 2016
  • 11:53 AM
  • 143 views

Bioterrorism: Lessons Learned From Anthrax

by Rita dos Santos Silva in United Academics

Anthrax attacks in 2001 were a wake-up call for the importance of preparedness.... Read more »

Riedel S. (2005) Anthrax: a continuing concern in the era of bioterrorism. Proceedings (Baylor University. Medical Center), 18(3), 234-43. PMID: 16200179  

Anderson, P. (2012) Bioterrorism: Toxins as Weapons. Journal of Pharmacy Practice, 25(2), 121-129. DOI: 10.1177/0897190012442351  

  • April 12, 2016
  • 09:47 AM
  • 137 views

Return of the wild: How nature breaks down what we build up

by Rosin Cerate in Rosin Cerate

When I was a teenager, I read Stephen King's book The Stand. It begins with the near-obliteration of humankind by a lethal virus. This was weirdly alluring stuff for a angsty teenage daydreamer. What would you do if the world ended? What would be your fate? I figured I'd make it a couple of months on canned food before succumbing to some sort of brutal antibiotic-resistant bacterial infection.... Read more »

  • April 12, 2016
  • 07:40 AM
  • 161 views

The most effective leaders clash with their company culture

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

Anyone will tell you that the most successful organisations have leaders who match the company culture. A CEO fixated on getting things done should lead somewhere driven by outcomes, a “mission culture”, whereas a people-focused leader suits a place focused on involvement and participation. This way everything is neat, tidy and aligned, with messages presented consistently, providing staff with reliable guides as to how to behave. But this is not what the data says in a new study published i........ Read more »

  • April 12, 2016
  • 07:13 AM
  • 149 views

Hanging out with virtual reality spiders helps arachnophobes see real spiders as smaller and less scary

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

By guest blogger Melissa HogenboomA little fear can be a good thing but when it develops into a phobia, it can become debilitating. One way therapists treat fear disorders is using a technique called exposure therapy. As its name suggests, it involves gradually exposing a person to the very thing they are afraid of.The problem is that in the comfort of a therapist's office, recreating the fearful event is not always straightforward. This means patients may not be able to realistically confront w........ Read more »

Shiban, Y., Fruth, M., Pauli, P., Kinateder, M., Reichenberger, J., & Mühlberger, A. (2016) Treatment effect on biases in size estimation in spider phobia. Biological Psychology. DOI: 10.1016/j.biopsycho.2016.03.005  

  • April 12, 2016
  • 02:51 AM
  • 161 views

Evidence of blurring on the autism spectrum edges

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

A quote to begin: "multiple types of genetic risk for ASDs [autism spectrum disorders] influence a continuum of behavioral and developmental traits, the severe tail of which can result in diagnosis with an ASD or other neuropsychiatric disorder."That was the bottom line of the findings reported by Elise Robinson and colleagues [1] looking at data from "several large ASD consortium and population-based resources" (N~38,000) including the fabulous resource that is ALSPAC. Specifically an........ Read more »

Robinson EB, St Pourcain B, Anttila V, Kosmicki JA, Bulik-Sullivan B, Grove J, Maller J, Samocha KE, Sanders SJ, Ripke S.... (2016) Genetic risk for autism spectrum disorders and neuropsychiatric variation in the general population. Nature genetics. PMID: 26998691  

  • April 11, 2016
  • 11:15 PM
  • 134 views

Choosing units of size for populations of cells

by Artem Kaznatcheev in Evolutionary Games Group

Recently, I have been interacting more and more closely with experiment. This has put me in the fortunate position of balancing the design and analysis of both theoretical and experimental models. It is tempting to think of theorists as people that come up with ideas to explain an existing body of facts, and of mathematical […]... Read more »

Shnerb, N.M., Louzoun, Y., Bettelheim, E., & Solomon, S. (2000) The importance of being discrete: life always wins on the surface. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 97(19), 10322-4. PMID: 10962027  

  • April 11, 2016
  • 04:19 PM
  • 119 views

ZIKV pathogenesis: development of animal models

by thelonevirologist in Virology Tidbits

Zika Virus (ZIKV) is a emerging positive strand RNA virus that belongs to the genus of Flaviviridae. Human infections are mostly asymptomatic although a causative link to microcephaly and Guillan-Barre Syndrome (GBS) have been proposed.
So far however no reliable animal model to study ZIKV associated disease has been identified but in order to test a potential vaccine and order to gain a better understanding of ZIKV pathogenesis animal models are being developed. Similar to DENV, these models ........ Read more »

Musso D, & Gubler DJ. (2016) Zika Virus. Clinical microbiology reviews, 29(3), 487-524. PMID: 27029595  

Chan KW, Watanabe S, Kavishna R, Alonso S, & Vasudevan SG. (2015) Animal models for studying dengue pathogenesis and therapy. Antiviral research, 5-14. PMID: 26304704  

DICK GW. (1952) Zika virus. II. Pathogenicity and physical properties. Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 46(5), 521-34. PMID: 12995441  

Rossi SL, Tesh RB, Azar SR, Muruato AE, Hanley KA, Auguste AJ, Langsjoen RM, Paessler S, Vasilakis N, & Weaver SC. (2016) Characterization of a Novel Murine Model to Study Zika Virus. The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene. PMID: 27022155  

Lazear, H., Govero, J., Smith, A., Platt, D., Fernandez, E., Miner, J., & Diamond, M. (2016) A Mouse Model of Zika Virus Pathogenesis. Cell Host . DOI: 10.1016/j.chom.2016.03.010  

Bell TM, Field EJ, & Narang HK. (1971) Zika virus infection of the central nervous system of mice. Archiv fur die gesamte Virusforschung, 35(2), 183-93. PMID: 5002906  

Hamel R, Dejarnac O, Wichit S, Ekchariyawat P, Neyret A, Luplertlop N, Perera-Lecoin M, Surasombatpattana P, Talignani L, Thomas F.... (2015) Biology of Zika Virus Infection in Human Skin Cells. Journal of virology, 89(17), 8880-96. PMID: 26085147  

Tang H, Hammack C, Ogden SC, Wen Z, Qian X, Li Y, Yao B, Shin J, Zhang F, Lee EM.... (2016) Zika Virus Infects Human Cortical Neural Progenitors and Attenuates Their Growth. Cell stem cell. PMID: 26952870  

Lefèvre F, Guillomot M, D'Andréa S, Battegay S, & La Bonnardière C. (1998) Interferon-delta: the first member of a novel type I interferon family. Biochimie, 80(8-9), 779-88. PMID: 9865499  

Lazear HM, Daniels BP, Pinto AK, Huang AC, Vick SC, Doyle SE, Gale M Jr, Klein RS, & Diamond MS. (2015) Interferon-λ restricts West Nile virus neuroinvasion by tightening the blood-brain barrier. Science translational medicine, 7(284). PMID: 25904743  

Rowland, A., Washington, C., Sheffield, J., Pardo-Villamizar, C., & Segars, J. (2016) Zika virus infection in semen: a call to action and research. Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics, 33(4), 435-437. DOI: 10.1007/s10815-016-0684-6  

  • April 11, 2016
  • 04:30 AM
  • 139 views

Psychological Factors Regarding Recovery May Influence Acute and Overuse Injury Risk

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

A reduced perception of recovery during a season may increase the risk of acute and overuse injury.... Read more »

van der Does HT, Brink MS, Otter RT, Visscher C, & Lemmink KA. (2016) Injury Risk Is Increased by Changes in Perceived Recovery of Team Sport Players. Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine. PMID: 26945309  

  • April 11, 2016
  • 02:19 AM
  • 161 views

Levels of paranoia are higher in autism: systematic review

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Paranoia, defined as the unfounded or exaggerated idea that something or someone is deliberately trying to psychologically, physically or financially harm you, is not an uncommon transient sentiment among the general population at one time or another. On a more pathological level, paranoid schizophrenia perhaps represents the archetypal label where paranoia assumes an altogether more persistent and 'life-changing' effect; also potentially escalating into more extreme behaviour/s.The idea th........ Read more »

  • April 11, 2016
  • 02:00 AM
  • 92 views

Week 14 In Review: Open-Access Science | 4 to 10 April

by TakFurTheKaffe in Tak Fur The Kaffe

River flooding boosts carbon emissions, six new species of Chinese dragon millipedes discovered, how ancient animals adapted to climate change, maths tell palaeontologists where to find fossils, and the Arctic Ocean was ice-free ten million years ago. Here are five of the latest scientific studies published open-access this week.... Read more »

Stegen, J., Fredrickson, J., Wilkins, M., Konopka, A., Nelson, W., Arntzen, E., Chrisler, W., Chu, R., Danczak, R., Fansler, S.... (2016) Groundwater–surface water mixing shifts ecological assembly processes and stimulates organic carbon turnover. Nature Communications, 11237. DOI: 10.1038/ncomms11237  

Botha-Brink, J., Codron, D., Huttenlocker, A., Angielczyk, K., & Ruta, M. (2016) Breeding Young as a Survival Strategy during Earth’s Greatest Mass Extinction. Scientific Reports, 24053. DOI: 10.1038/srep24053  

Stein, R., Fahl, K., Schreck, M., Knorr, G., Niessen, F., Forwick, M., Gebhardt, C., Jensen, L., Kaminski, M., Kopf, A.... (2016) Evidence for ice-free summers in the late Miocene central Arctic Ocean. Nature Communications, 11148. DOI: 10.1038/ncomms11148  

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