Post List

  • July 9, 2014
  • 07:33 PM
  • 75 views

The effects of the sole geometry of the On running shoe

by Craig Payne in Running Research Junkie

The effects of the sole geometry of the On running shoe... Read more »

Knoepfli-Lenzin, C., Waech, J., Gülay, T., Schellenberg, F., & Lorenzetti, S. (2014) The influence of a new sole geometry while running. Journal of Sports Sciences, 1-9. DOI: 10.1080/02640414.2014.915421  

  • July 9, 2014
  • 03:43 PM
  • 80 views

Researchers Create Sand-Based Li-Ion Batteries

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

Researchers at the University of California, Riverside, have developed an inexpensive way to produce sand-based Li-ion batteries.... Read more »

  • July 9, 2014
  • 01:37 PM
  • 108 views

Lose Weight, Live Longer. Simple, Right?

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Suprise! Really this shouldn’t come as a shock, but adults with extreme obesity have increased risks of dying at a younger age from cancer and other complications like stroke, diabetes, heart disease, […]... Read more »

Kitahara, C., Flint, A., Berrington de Gonzalez, A., Bernstein, L., Brotzman, M., MacInnis, R., Moore, S., Robien, K., Rosenberg, P., Singh, P.... (2014) Association between Class III Obesity (BMI of 40–59 kg/m2) and Mortality: A Pooled Analysis of 20 Prospective Studies. PLoS Medicine, 11(7). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pmed.1001673  

  • July 9, 2014
  • 12:06 PM
  • 75 views

Brain Hippocampus Atrophy in Traumatic Brain Injury

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

Understanding the specific brain regions vulnerable to traumatic brain injury (TBI) is important for assessment and intervention research.Two areas of active research include studies of brain white matter using diffusion tensor imaging and assessment of regional brain atrophy using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).Two recent MRI studies have suggested the brain hippocampus may be a region of vulnerability to TBI.A Canadian study by Robin Green and colleagues used brain MRI to examine a cohort of........ Read more »

Green RE, Colella B, Maller JJ, Bayley M, Glazer J, & Mikulis DJ. (2014) Scale and pattern of atrophy in the chronic stages of moderate-severe TBI. Frontiers in human neuroscience, 67. PMID: 24744712  

Singh R, Meier TB, Kuplicki R, Savitz J, Mukai I, Cavanagh L, Allen T, Teague TK, Nerio C, Polanski D.... (2014) Relationship of collegiate football experience and concussion with hippocampal volume and cognitive outcomes. JAMA : the journal of the American Medical Association, 311(18), 1883-8. PMID: 24825643  

  • July 9, 2014
  • 12:05 PM
  • 99 views

You can do it! Self-talk is more effective when you refer to yourself as You, rather than I

by Christian Jarrett in BPS Research Digest

We know self-talk can help people's self-control (e.g. "Don't do it!"), and boost their morale (e.g. "Hang in there!") in sporting situations. However, before now, no-one has investigated whether self-talk is more effective depending on whether you refer to yourself in the grammatical first person (i.e. "I can do it!") or the second person (i.e. "You can do it?").Sanda Dolcos and her team first asked 95 psychology undergrads to imagine they were a character in a short story. The charac........ Read more »

  • July 9, 2014
  • 11:32 AM
  • 78 views

TCAS AS PAINKILLERS: PROOF THAT YOU CAN TEACH AN OLD DOG NEW TRICKS

by Emily Lawson in Antisense Science

The creation of a new drug that is safer, more effective, and has fewer side effects than the current treatment surely renders the current treatment obsolete, right? Well, not necessarily.

Take tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) for instance. TCAs are a class of antidepressant that work by blocking the serotonin and noradrenaline transporters, leading to an increase in the amount of serotonin and noradrenaline in the synapse. As the current theory says that depression is caused by low levels of........ Read more »

Sindrup, S., Otto, M., Finnerup, N., & Jensen, T. (2005) Antidepressants in the Treatment of Neuropathic Pain. Basic Clinical Pharmacology Toxicology, 96(6), 399-409. DOI: 10.1111/j.1742-7843.2005.pto_96696601.x  

Bohren Y, Tessier LH, Megat S, Petitjean H, Hugel S, Daniel D, Kremer M, Fournel S, Hein L, Schlichter R.... (2013) Antidepressants suppress neuropathic pain by a peripheral β2-adrenoceptor mediated anti-TNFα mechanism. Neurobiology of disease, 39-50. PMID: 23978467  

Micó JA, Ardid D, Berrocoso E, & Eschalier A. (2006) Antidepressants and pain. Trends in pharmacological sciences, 27(7), 348-54. PMID: 16762426  

  • July 9, 2014
  • 11:19 AM
  • 88 views

Say No to Nocebo: How Doctors Can Keep Patients’ Minds from Making Them Sicker

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish

“First, do no harm,” the saying goes, but that might be close to impossible. Just as our expectations can make us feel better, they can also make us feel much worse. This means that how doctors phrase their instructions or introduce new drugs may have a real impact on our health. But some doctors are […]The post Say No to Nocebo: How Doctors Can Keep Patients’ Minds from Making Them Sicker appeared first on Inkfish.... Read more »

  • July 9, 2014
  • 11:00 AM
  • 4 views

Chimp Talk

by Viputheshwar Sitaraman in Draw Science

Learn how to speak chimp with the newly translated language of chimpanzee gestures in non-play context.... Read more »

Hobaiter C, & Byrne RW. (2014) The Meanings of Chimpanzee Gestures. Current biology : CB. PMID: 24998524  

  • July 9, 2014
  • 09:37 AM
  • 79 views

Video Tip of the Week: Google Genomics, API and GAbrowse

by Mary in OpenHelix

This week’s video tip comes to us from Google–it’s about their participation in the “Global Alliance for Genomics and Health” coalition. Global Alliance is aimed at developing genomic data standards for interoperability, and they’ve been working on creating the framework (some background links below in the references will provide further details). It has over 170 […]... Read more »

  • July 9, 2014
  • 09:21 AM
  • 82 views

Clothing the Dead in Ancient Peru

by Katy Meyers in Bones Don't Lie

Why is clothing on the dead so important? Because what we choose to put on our bodies conveys social meanings about our wealth, our status, and the social groups we […]... Read more »

  • July 9, 2014
  • 09:21 AM
  • 100 views

A Deadly Shot: Heart Attacks During The World Cup

by Nura Rutten in United Academics

Studies show that there is an increase in cardiovascular events, such as heart attacks, at the time of important football matches like the World Cup. Especially penalty shoot-outs can cause a higher number of myocardial infarctions. However, there are also studies that report no significant influence or even a decrease in cardiac emergencies.... Read more »

Mendenhall, M., Ute Wilbert-Lampen, M.D.,, David Leistner, M.D.,, Sonja Greven, M.S.,, Tilmann Pohl, M.D.,, Sebastian Sper,, Christoph Völker,, Denise Güthlin,, Andrea Plasse,, Andreas Knez, M.D.,.... (2008) Cardiovascular Events During World Cup Soccer. The Journal of Emergency Medicine, 35(1), 114-115. DOI: 10.1016/j.jemermed.2008.03.028  

Carroll D, Ebrahim S, Tilling K, Macleod J, & Smith GD. (2002) Admissions for myocardial infarction and World Cup football: database survey. BMJ (Clinical research ed.), 325(7378), 1439-42. PMID: 12493655  

  • July 9, 2014
  • 08:58 AM
  • 96 views

New Electrochemistry Tech Makes Batteries Last Longer

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

Scientists at the University of Alberta have used a process called induced fluorination to create faster-charging, longer-lasting batteries.... Read more »

  • July 9, 2014
  • 08:30 AM
  • 88 views

Sub-Optimal Choice in Dogs: Cheese or Cheese and Carrot?

by CAPB in Companion Animal Psychology Blog

Evidence suggests dogs do not always make the best choice. A new study finds that far as food choice is concerned, they use the same heuristic previously demonstrated in humans and monkeys. Photo: Igor Sokolov (breeze) / ShutterstockEarlier research has found that if people are asked to estimate the value of a set of 24 good condition dishes vs a set of 40 dishes (of which 31 are in good condition), they tend to think the former is more valuable. The broken dishes seem to detract ........ Read more »

  • July 9, 2014
  • 08:15 AM
  • 87 views

What’s So Repelling About Repellents?

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

It’s amazing that even though citronella and DEET reduce mosquito bites, we have very little idea of how they work. New research is showing that DEET interacts with olfactory receptors so that chemical attractants are still sensed, but their interpretations are confused. You are still there, but you pretty disappear as far as the mosquito is concerned. Other research shows that one of the co-receptors for olfactory receptors is responsible not only for DEET activity, but also for mosquito ........ Read more »

  • July 9, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 40 views

So can you explain how that works in your own words?

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

We do a lot of pretrial research where complicated processes, inventions, ideas, software, tools, widgets, and other intellectual property ideas are explained. And we do a lot of pretrial research where something that doesn’t seem complicated (like a family estate, for example) gets very complicated, very quickly. We’ve found there are often vocal mock jurors […]

Related posts:
Playing the race card: When it works and why it doesn’t
False Confessions: “No one really does that unl........ Read more »

Fernbach PM, Rogers T, Fox CR, & Sloman SA. (2013) Political extremism is supported by an illusion of understanding. Psychological Science, 24(6), 939-46. PMID: 23620547  

  • July 9, 2014
  • 05:52 AM
  • 66 views

Familial Recurrence of Autism Spectrum Disorder (again)

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

The paper by Neil Risch and colleagues [1] adds to the growing literature looking at the question of familial recurrence of autism i.e. if one child has a diagnosis of autism, how likely are subsequent children to be similarly diagnosed. The answer according to this latest data: "The overall sibling recurrence risk was 10.1%" compared with 0.5% in siblings of asymptomatic controls. This figure is pretty much the same as that reported by Sandin and colleagues [2] covered not so long ago (see here........ Read more »

  • July 9, 2014
  • 04:30 AM
  • 52 views

Maize lethal necrosis has spread to Rwanda

by Abigail Rumsey in The Plantwise Blog

Report by Abigail Rumsey, Beatrice Uwumukiza and Bellancila Uzayisenga. In the past two years, we have reported on the presence of the maize lethal necrosis (MLN) disease in East African countries including Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda. The disease is also present in South Sudan. The most recent report has been of its spread to the […]... Read more »

Adams, I., Harju, V., Hodges, T., Hany, U., Skelton, A., Rai, S., Deka, M., Smith, J., Fox, A., Uzayisenga, B.... (2014) First report of maize lethal necrosis disease in Rwanda. New Disease Reports, 22. DOI: 10.5197/j.2044-0588.2014.029.022  

  • July 9, 2014
  • 03:28 AM
  • 72 views

Do chimps like to listen to African and Indian music?

by Henkjan Honing in Music Matters

“While preferring silence to music from the West, chimpanzees apparently like to listen to the different rhythms of music from Africa and India, according to new research published by the American Psychological Association.” ... Read more »

Mingle, M., Eppley, T., Campbell, M., Hall, K., Horner, V., & de Waal, F. (2014) Chimpanzees Prefer African and Indian Music Over Silence. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Learning and Cognition. DOI: 10.1037/xan0000032  

Merchant, H., & Honing, H. (2013) Are non-human primates capable of rhythmic entrainment? Evidence for the gradual audiomotor evolution hypothesis. Frontiers in Neuroscience, 7(274). info:/

  • July 9, 2014
  • 01:18 AM
  • 84 views

The Warrior Gene, Back from the Grave

by nooffensebut in The Unsilenced Science

Recently two meta-analyses on the gene, monoamine oxidase A, and its relationship with violence came to opposite conclusions. I review those studies and pose the questions that the scientists were too afraid to answer.... Read more »

  • July 9, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 50 views

If You’re Not Using the SCAT-2 For On-Field Concussion Diagnosis Maybe You Should Be

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

The SCAT-2 tool composite score is useful in sports-related concussion assessment in a college setting due to its high sensitivity and specificity especially if you can compare a post injury score with a baseline measure.... Read more »

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