Post List

  • April 7, 2017
  • 07:02 AM
  • 69 views

Which science is most “certain” according to the American public? 

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

When litigation cases rely on science or highly technical information, it is critical to help jurors understand the information underlying the case at a level that makes sense to them. If they do not understand your “science”, they will simply guess which party to vote for or “follow the crowd”. Here’s an example of what […]... Read more »

Broomell, S., & Kane, P. (2017) Public perception and communication of scientific uncertainty. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 146(2), 286-304. DOI: 10.1037/xge0000260  

  • April 7, 2017
  • 07:00 AM
  • 80 views

Friday Fellow: Amphibian chytrid fungus

by Piter Boll in Earthling Nature

by Piter Kehoma Boll Today I’m bringing you a species that is probably one of the most terrible ones to exist today, the amphibian chytrid fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, also known simply as Bd. The amphibian chytrid fungus, as its name says, is … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • April 7, 2017
  • 06:22 AM
  • 266 views

Novel FLCN mutations in Chinese patients

by Joana Guedes in BHD Research Blog

The gene FLCN is inactivated in individuals with BHD syndrome. The FLCN gene encodes the protein Folliculin, which is a putative tumour suppressor. Over 150 different FLCN mutations have been identified, most of which are likely to be pathogenic (LOVD-hosted FLCN mutation database). The majority of these mutations are frameshift, nonsense, insertion/deletion, or splice site mutations, resulting in truncation and inactivation of the encoded protein folliculin. FLCN consists of 14 exons spanning a........ Read more »

  • April 7, 2017
  • 04:48 AM
  • 325 views

Folate-dependent one carbon metabolism and transsulfuration pathways: biomarkers for autism?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

I found it a little unusual that the findings reported by Daniel Howsmon and colleagues [1] (open-access) talking about "multivariate statistical analysis presented herein [provided] unprecedented quantitative classification results for separating participants into ASD [autism spectrum disorder] and NEU [neurotypical] cohorts based solely on biochemical data" merited a rapid reply in a prominent science magazine pouring cold water on the results (see here). Not least bec........ Read more »

  • April 6, 2017
  • 02:44 AM
  • 330 views

"a single intravenous infusion of autologous umbilical cord blood" and autism

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

'Could stem cells offer hope for autism?' went one media headline referencing the very preliminary "phase I, open-label trial" published by Geraldine Dawson and colleagues [1] (open-access) detailing the experiences of a single intravenous infusion of autologous umbilical cord blood in 25 children with "a confirmed diagnosis of ASD [autism spectrum disorder]."Well, the results were promising in respect of important issues such as safety in light of the tenet 'first do no harm': "Assess........ Read more »

Geraldine Dawson, Jessica M. Sun, Katherine S. Davlantis, Michael Murias,, Lauren Franz, Jesse Troy, Ryan Simmons, Maura Sabatos-DeVito, Rebecca Durham, & Joanne Kurtzberg. (2017) Autologous Cord Blood Infusions Are Safe and Feasible in Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: Results of a Single-Center Phase I Open-Label Trial. Stem Cells Translational Medicine. info:/10.1002/sctm.16-0474

  • April 5, 2017
  • 07:02 AM
  • 284 views

Your Black client is much more likely to be wrongfully convicted

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Those of us who’ve been around for a while have heard this repeatedly. But, lest you think times are changing, here’s some sobering data from a March, 2017 report co-edited by a Michigan State University College of Law Professor. From the beginning, this is a disturbing report. Here’s how it starts: African-Americans are only 13% […]... Read more »

Samuel R. Gross, Maurice Possley, & Klara Stephens. (2017) Race and Wrongful Convictions in the United States. . UC Irvine: National Registry of Exonerations. . info:/

  • April 5, 2017
  • 04:30 AM
  • 279 views

Elbow Stress May Compromise Elbow Health

by Catherine E. Lewis in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Workers and athletes exposed to greater elbow stress (from vibration, high forces, or high repetition) may be more likely to develop elbow osteoarthritis. ... Read more »

  • April 5, 2017
  • 03:14 AM
  • 329 views

Paediatric congenital heart disease and autism risk (again)

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"Risk of autism spectrum disorder screening status in children with congenital heart defects was higher than expected from population rates."So said the findings reported by Jessica Bean Jaworski and colleagues [1] who set about "to assess the rates of autism spectrum disorders in a large sample of children with a history of congenital heart defects and to assess medical, behavioral, and individual factors that may be associated with the risk of autism spectrum disorders." Covering a topic that ........ Read more »

Bean Jaworski JL, Flynn T, Burnham N, Chittams JL, Sammarco T, Gerdes M, Bernbaum JC, Clancy RR, Solot CB, Zackai EH.... (2017) Rates of autism and potential risk factors in children with congenital heart defects. Congenital heart disease. PMID: 28299880  

  • April 4, 2017
  • 06:00 PM
  • 193 views

New rice fights off drought

by adam phillips in It Ain't Magic

Researchers have created drought resistant transgenic rice using a gene from a small Eurasian flowering plant.... Read more »

  • April 4, 2017
  • 11:00 AM
  • 313 views

Researchers Finally Ask: Does Your Cat Even Like To Be Around You?

by Miss Behavior in The Scorpion and the Frog

This cat has had enough and is running away from home. Photo by Danielle Menuey.While dogs happily and obliviously boast the reputation of being “man’s best friend”, cats have a reputation of being antisocial, independent, and downright grumpy. But do cats really deserve that? Scientists finally decided to find out.Kristin Vitale Shreve and Monique Udell from Oregon State University and Lindsay Mehrkam from Monmouth University asked 25 pet cats and 25 shelter cats their preferences. H........ Read more »

  • April 4, 2017
  • 02:55 AM
  • 285 views

Autism, ageing and comorbidity

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

I'm not spending too much time today on the findings published by Elizabeth Wise and colleagues [1] but did want to bring them to your attention. Looking at the presentation of "comorbidities and behavioral and neuropsychiatric symptoms" in relation to autism in the context of ageing, some important details were noted. Not least that "GI [gastrointestinal] disorders (68.9%) and seizure disorders (23%) were common, and 25.7% of the sample had a BMI [body mass index] >30" wh........ Read more »

  • April 4, 2017
  • 12:49 AM
  • 248 views

A clue towards understanding intrinsically disordered proteins

by ragothamanyennamalli in Getting to know Structural Bioinformatics

ntrinsically disordered proteins are thought to be fully functional, yet do not confirm to a single conformation, thereby identifying their structure via crystallography becomes problematic. Many intrinsically disordered proteins have been studied and analyzed using NMR methods, however the question as to why proteins are intrinsically disordered is still debatable.... Read more »

  • April 3, 2017
  • 01:00 PM
  • 62 views

Medical practice precariousness at the Unified Health System — SUS

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective | Press Releases

The medical practice in the Unified Health System is a study topic published in the journal Estudos de Psicologia (Campinas), which reveals the working conditions of these professionals and the impacts on personal health, analyzed through interviews and self-confidence. … Read More →... Read more »

  • April 3, 2017
  • 10:59 AM
  • 284 views

Criminal defense? Brain scans could show whether “they did it  on purpose”

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

When my kids were younger, I used to talk to them about the difference between intent and impact as they struggled to understand the varying reactions of people to their behavior. Back in 2009, we posted on some new research showing that we reacted more indignantly when bad deeds were done “on purpose”. Here is […]... Read more »

Vilares I, Wesley MJ, Ahn WY, Bonnie RJ, Hoffman M, Jones OD, Morse SJ, Yaffe G, Lohrenz T, & Montague PR. (2017) Predicting the knowledge-recklessness distinction in the human brain. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 114(12), 3222-3227. PMID: 28289225  

  • April 3, 2017
  • 10:23 AM
  • 288 views

Financial Scam Vulnerability: Brain Risk Factors

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

It is always frustrating when you hear about a financial scam that has target a vulnerable population like the elderly population.Elderly individuals may be targeted for a variety of reasons. First, they often have financial resources. Second, they may be a generally more trustworthy group increasing risk for falling for a scam. Third, elderly may suffer from some age-related brain changes that impair cognition and judgment.A recent research study suggests specific brain deficits may increase vu........ Read more »

  • April 3, 2017
  • 09:00 AM
  • 265 views

"Science is Under Attack." A Climate Scientist's Call to Action for the Future of our Planet.

by EE Giorgi in CHIMERAS

It’s a foggy morning in London. Meteorologist George Simpson, the director of the British Meteorological Office, sips his tea and opens a paper authored by a scientist named Guy Stewart Callendar. The last sentence of the abstract reads, “The temperature observations at 200 meteorological stations are used to show that world temperatures have actually increased at an average rate of 0.005°C per year during the past half century.”Simpson shakes his head and thinks, “Nonsense. It’s all ........ Read more »

  • April 3, 2017
  • 04:30 AM
  • 241 views

Don’t Let Your Concussed Athletes Spin Out of Control; PT is Feasible!

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Closely supervised cervical and vestibular ocular therapy may help safely return concussed athletes to play.... Read more »

  • April 3, 2017
  • 03:10 AM
  • 293 views

Decreased urinary creatinine levels associated with autism (again)

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

One finding in particular stood out from those reported by Lussu and colleagues [1] following some nifty metabolomic investigations: decreased levels of urinary creatinine in their cohort of participants diagnosed as on the autism spectrum (n=21) compared with "controls (n = 21), these being siblings of autistic patients."Based on the "use of 1 H-NMR metabolomics to analyze the global biochemical signature of ASD [autism spectrum disorder] patients" researchers turned again to a fa........ Read more »

Lussu M, Noto A, Masili A, Rinaldi AC, Dessì A, De Angelis M, De Giacomo A, Fanos V, Atzori L, & Francavilla R. (2017) The urinary 1 H-NMR metabolomics profile of an italian autistic children population and their unaffected siblings. Autism research : official journal of the International Society for Autism Research. PMID: 28296209  

  • April 2, 2017
  • 06:17 AM
  • 261 views

The perfect multilingual

by Madalena Cruz-Ferreira in Being Multilingual

P { margin-bottom: 0.08in; } In case you’re wondering, let me reassure you straight away that yes, the title of this post is meant to be sarcastic. Perfect multilinguals do exist, of course, though only in the minds of those of us who mistake ideals of perfection for reality. Multilingual perfection awardees must satisfy a number of criteria. If you are, or were, a language learner as an adult, forget it: not having acquired all of your languages as a young child automatically makes you a n........ Read more »

  • April 2, 2017
  • 04:10 AM
  • 279 views

On the under-studied populations within the autism spectrum

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

I don't typically post on a Sunday, but given that today - 2nd April - is World Autism Awareness Day I've decided to make an exception. The theme of today's post is based around the notion that the autism spectrum is truly wide and heterogeneous, and although this is fairly universally acknowledged, the current peer-reviewed research literature on autism is perhaps not yet so accepting. So...Consistent with the idea that scientific research seems to go through cycles of themes/interests, th........ Read more »

Chakrabarti B. (2017) Commentary: Critical considerations for studying low-functioning autism. Journal of child psychology and psychiatry, and allied disciplines, 58(4), 436-438. PMID: 28346760  

join us!

Do you write about peer-reviewed research in your blog? Use ResearchBlogging.org to make it easy for your readers — and others from around the world — to find your serious posts about academic research.

If you don't have a blog, you can still use our site to learn about fascinating developments in cutting-edge research from around the world.

Register Now

Research Blogging is powered by SRI Technology.

To learn more, visit http://selfregulationinstitute.org/.