Post List

  • January 27, 2016
  • 03:37 AM
  • 139 views

Caste system has affected Indians’ genomes

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

Main Point:

The caste system has affected Indians, even at the level of DNA.

Published in:

PNAS

Study Further:

Caste system in India was introduced about 1,500 years ago, when Gupta emperors were ruling most of the India. That caste system also made it socially unacceptable to marry outside the castes. Now, researchers have found that the caste system left a significant impact on the genes of Indians.

In a study, researchers from India studied the genomes of about 367 Indians f........ Read more »

  • January 27, 2016
  • 03:03 AM
  • 141 views

Feigning ADHD?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Feign: "to pretend to feel or be affected by (something)."I tread very carefully today with this post based on the findings reported by Paul Marshall and colleagues [1] who concluded that: "a significant percentage of those making a suspect effort will be diagnosed with ADHD [attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder] using the most commonly employed assessment methods."Their findings, based on the examination of "how many adult patients would plausibly receive a diagnosis of attention-........ Read more »

  • January 26, 2016
  • 06:38 PM
  • 116 views

Tardigrades Are One Giant Head

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish



No one would argue that tardigrades got stiffed in the weirdness department. These teensy animals, also called water bears, look roly-poly under a microscope. Less than a millimeter long, they can survive extremes of heat, cold, pressure, and radiation that are deadly to most other lifeforms. Under duress, a tardigrade may curl itself into a dried-up ball called a tun, then stay in a state of suspended animation for years before returning to life. Now, researchers poring over the animal's g........ Read more »

Smith, F., Boothby, T., Giovannini, I., Rebecchi, L., Jockusch, E., & Goldstein, B. (2016) The Compact Body Plan of Tardigrades Evolved by the Loss of a Large Body Region. Current Biology, 26(2), 224-229. DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2015.11.059  

  • January 26, 2016
  • 06:18 PM
  • 152 views

Ways of seeing

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

Here in Australia we celebrated our national holiday yesterday. Australia Day marks the end of the summer holiday season and as everyone heads back to school and work, Language on the Move is coming back from our break, too. Welcome … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • January 26, 2016
  • 03:35 PM
  • 105 views

Children in the Emergency Department

by Eva Alisic in Trauma Recovery

Jonas was a master tree climber. Until today. Now his left leg has a strange angle, and he has been knocked out by the fall.

Every year, millions of injured children require treatment at a hospital Emergency Department. Approximately 1 in 6 of them develop persistent stress symptoms, such as nightmares, concentration difficulties and negative thoughts.

Emergency Department doctors and nurses provide physical care but they can also support children’s emotional wellbeing. How well are ........ Read more »

  • January 26, 2016
  • 03:35 PM
  • 91 views

Children in the Emergency Department

by Eva Alisic in Trauma Recovery

Jonas was a master tree climber. Until today. Now his left leg has a strange angle, and he has been knocked out by the fall.

Every year, millions of injured children require treatment at a hospital Emergency Department. Approximately 1 in 6 of them develop persistent stress symptoms, such as nightmares, concentration difficulties and negative thoughts.

Emergency Department doctors and nurses provide physical care but they can also support children’s emotional wellbeing. How well are ........ Read more »

  • January 26, 2016
  • 03:35 PM
  • 106 views

Children in the Emergency Department

by Eva Alisic in Trauma Recovery

Jonas was a master tree climber. Until today. Now his left leg has a strange angle, and he has been knocked out by the fall.

Every year, millions of injured children require treatment at a hospital Emergency Department. Approximately 1 in 6 of them develop persistent stress symptoms, such as nightmares, concentration difficulties and negative thoughts.

Emergency Department doctors and nurses provide physical care but they can also support children’s emotional wellbeing. How well are ........ Read more »

  • January 26, 2016
  • 03:35 PM
  • 93 views

Children in the Emergency Department

by Eva Alisic in Trauma Recovery

Jonas was a master tree climber. Until today. Now his left leg has a strange angle, and he has been knocked out by the fall.

Every year, millions of injured children require treatment at a hospital Emergency Department. Approximately 1 in 6 of them develop persistent stress symptoms, such as nightmares, concentration difficulties and negative thoughts.

Emergency Department doctors and nurses provide physical care but they can also support children’s emotional wellbeing. How well are ........ Read more »

  • January 26, 2016
  • 03:35 PM
  • 104 views

Children in the Emergency Department

by Eva Alisic in Trauma Recovery

Jonas was a master tree climber. Until today. Now his left leg has a strange angle, and he has been knocked out by the fall.

Every year, millions of injured children require treatment at a hospital Emergency Department. Approximately 1 in 6 of them develop persistent stress symptoms, such as nightmares, concentration difficulties and negative thoughts.

Emergency Department doctors and nurses provide physical care but they can also support children’s emotional wellbeing. How well are ........ Read more »

  • January 26, 2016
  • 03:35 PM
  • 94 views

Children in the Emergency Department

by Eva Alisic in Trauma Recovery

Jonas was a master tree climber. Until today. Now his left leg has a strange angle, and he has been knocked out by the fall.

Every year, millions of injured children require treatment at a hospital Emergency Department. Approximately 1 in 6 of them develop persistent stress symptoms, such as nightmares, concentration difficulties and negative thoughts.

Emergency Department doctors and nurses provide physical care but they can also support children’s emotional wellbeing. How well are ........ Read more »

  • January 26, 2016
  • 03:35 PM
  • 92 views

Children in the Emergency Department

by Eva Alisic in Trauma Recovery

Jonas was a master tree climber. Until today. Now his left leg has a strange angle, and he has been knocked out by the fall.

Every year, millions of injured children require treatment at a hospital Emergency Department. Approximately 1 in 6 of them develop persistent stress symptoms, such as nightmares, concentration difficulties and negative thoughts.

Emergency Department doctors and nurses provide physical care but they can also support children’s emotional wellbeing. How well are ........ Read more »

  • January 26, 2016
  • 03:35 PM
  • 112 views

Children in the Emergency Department

by Eva Alisic in Trauma Recovery

Jonas was a master tree climber. Until today. Now his left leg has a strange angle, and he has been knocked out by the fall.

Every year, millions of injured children require treatment at a hospital Emergency Department. Approximately 1 in 6 of them develop persistent stress symptoms, such as nightmares, concentration difficulties and negative thoughts.

Emergency Department doctors and nurses provide physical care but they can also support children’s emotional wellbeing. How well are ........ Read more »

  • January 26, 2016
  • 03:35 PM
  • 109 views

Children in the Emergency Department

by Eva Alisic in Trauma Recovery

Jonas was a master tree climber. Until today. Now his left leg has a strange angle, and he has been knocked out by the fall.

Every year, millions of injured children require treatment at a hospital Emergency Department. Approximately 1 in 6 of them develop persistent stress symptoms, such as nightmares, concentration difficulties and negative thoughts.

Emergency Department doctors and nurses provide physical care but they can also support children’s emotional wellbeing. How well are ........ Read more »

  • January 26, 2016
  • 03:20 PM
  • 145 views

Why you should never use the term ‘the mentally ill’

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Even subtle differences in how you refer to people with mental illness can affect levels of tolerance, a new study has found. In a first-of-its-kind study, researchers found that participants showed less tolerance toward people who were referred to as "the mentally ill" when compared to those referred to as "people with mental illness."

... Read more »

  • January 26, 2016
  • 11:11 AM
  • 151 views

New review prompts a re-think on what low sugar levels do to our thinking

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

Glucose. Fuel for our cells, vital for life. But how fundamental is it to how we think?According to dual-systems theory (best known from Nobel laureate Daniel Kahneman’s work), low blood glucose favours the use of fast and dirty System One thinking over the deliberative, effortful System Two. Similarly, the ego depletion theory of Roy Baumeister sees glucose as a resource that gets used up whenever we resist a temptation.But the authors of a new meta-analysis published in Psychological Bulleti........ Read more »

  • January 26, 2016
  • 03:11 AM
  • 148 views

Quality of life of parents of children with autism systematically reviewed

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"This review verified previous reports on lower QoL [quality of life] among parents of children with ASD [autism spectrum disorder] and highlighted potential areas of support."So said the findings reported by Eleni Vasilopoulou & Joy Nisbet [1] who surveyed the available peer-reviewed literature looking at "QoL among parents of children with ASD (<18 years)". They also reported on various factors potentially contributory to the reported lower QoL including "child ........ Read more »

  • January 25, 2016
  • 02:06 PM
  • 155 views

Scientists shed new light on workings of genetic regulation

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

A team of scientists has uncovered greater intricacy in protein signaling than was previously understood, shedding new light on the nature of genetic production.
... Read more »

  • January 25, 2016
  • 01:33 PM
  • 139 views

Bacteria can turn chocolate pudding green

by Rosin Cerate in Rosin Cerate

In 1994, a paper on pudding was published by a party of microbiologists plying their trade in South Africa.... Read more »

  • January 25, 2016
  • 11:55 AM
  • 99 views

Want to be a leader? Maybe you should grow a  mustache…

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

We’re unsure if this strategy would work for women but it seems to work for men—at least in medical schools and teaching hospitals. We do presume those male leaders with mustaches do not have the sort of mustache illustrating this post but what do we know? We also tend to believe that if a woman […]

Related posts:
You wanted to be a leader! Act like one! (or else)
Gender and Leadership: When Do Women Excel?
Now, that’s a good-looking leader! (At  least, in this group.)


... Read more »

  • January 25, 2016
  • 11:52 AM
  • 163 views

Zika virus and the negligence towards health research in poor countries

by Piter Boll in Earthling Nature

by Piter Kehoma Boll About a year ago, almost nobody on the whole world was aware of the existence of a virus named Zika virus and the illness it may cause in humans, the Zika fever or Zika disease. But … Continue reading →... Read more »

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