Post List

  • August 15, 2014
  • 04:46 PM
  • 108 views

Global similarity signals of recognition strength

by Emilie Reas in Emilie Reas - Remember

The below article was recently rejected from the Journal of Neuroscience as a ‘Journal Club’ commentary on Davis et al., 2014, ‘Medial temporal lobe global similarity signals underlie recognition strength’. Hoping that my efforts will not go to waste, I’d like to give the piece an alternate home here. Please read, comment and share, all […]... Read more »

Davis T, Xue G, Love BC, Preston AR, & Poldrack RA. (2014) Global neural pattern similarity as a common basis for categorization and recognition memory. The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience, 34(22), 7472-84. PMID: 24872552  

  • August 15, 2014
  • 03:20 PM
  • 87 views

In Defense of Eating Junk Food in Eating Disorder Treatment

by Shirley in Science of Eating Disorders


Should eating disorder patients be introduced to “junk food” or “hyper-palatable” foods during treatment? A few days ago, I stumbled across a blog post where Dr. Julie O’Toole, Founder and Director of the Kartini Clinic for Disordered Eating, argues against introducing “junk food” during ED treatment. The crux of the argument is that “hyperpalatable foods”—e.g., chips and Cheetos—are not real food and should never be forced or encouraged for anyone, regard........ Read more »

  • August 15, 2014
  • 02:00 PM
  • 85 views

GENE THERAPY- THE FUTURE OF SCHIZOPHRENIA TREATMENT?

by Juia Rose in Antisense Science

A study was recently released in Nature looking at genes linked to schizophrenia with the hope of helping researchers to find a whole host of brand new treatments for patients with the illness. Schizophrenia currently accounts for almost 25% of all psychiatric admissions of young people in the UK and current treatments aid in managing the symptoms, however no fundamentally new therapies have been developed since the 1950’s. The study which identified 108 gene loci that are altered in patie........ Read more »

Schizophrenia Working Group of the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium. (2014) Biological insights from 108 schizophrenia-associated genetic loci. Nature, 511(7510), 421-7. PMID: 25056061  

  • August 15, 2014
  • 01:29 PM
  • 110 views

Swamp Thing and Plant Communication

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Maybe I’m dating myself here, but ever see the swamp thing movie, television show, or even the comic? Call me picky, after all we are talking about a human/plant hybrid, but he never needed to talk. I know, some of you are probably rolling your eyes at me given it’s a comic, movie or tv show [depending on your level of geek], but come on, this is science![…]... Read more »

G. Kim,, M. L. LeBlanc,, E. K. Wafula,, C. W. dePamphilis,, & J. H. Westwood. (2014) Genomic-scale exchange of mRNA between a parasitic plant and its hosts. Science. info:/10.1126/science.1253122

  • August 15, 2014
  • 11:34 AM
  • 78 views

Breaking research: A new technique for uncovering cell-specific differences in the Drosophila “interactome”

by Bethany Christmann in Fly on the Wall

A recently published fly paper describes a new technique for uncovering cell-specific differences in protein interactions. I review this paper and discuss its relevance to human health.... Read more »

  • August 15, 2014
  • 08:35 AM
  • 143 views

The Friday Five 8/15/2014

by Bill Sullivan in The 'Scope

An amusing look at 5 of the hottest science news stories this week... Read more »

Rechavi, O., Houri-Ze’evi, L., Anava, S., Goh, W., Kerk, S., Hannon, G., & Hobert, O. (2014) Starvation-Induced Transgenerational Inheritance of Small RNAs in C. elegans. Cell, 158(2), 277-287. DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2014.06.020  

Yang B, Treweek JB, Kulkarni RP, Deverman BE, Chen CK, Lubeck E, Shah S, Cai L, & Gradinaru V. (2014) Single-Cell Phenotyping within Transparent Intact Tissue through Whole-Body Clearing. Cell. PMID: 25088144  

Hsu, D., Huang, L., Nordgren, L., Rucker, D., & Galinsky, A. (2014) The Music of Power: Perceptual and Behavioral Consequences of Powerful Music. Social Psychological and Personality Science. DOI: 10.1177/1948550614542345  

  • August 15, 2014
  • 08:32 AM
  • 125 views

Bacteria Produce Unique Battery Electrode Material

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

A group of scientists at the Okayama University, Tokyo Institute of Technology and Kyoto University has shown that iron oxide nanoparticles produced by bacteria in groundwater has a potential to be used as anode material for lithium-ion batteries.... Read more »

Hashimoto, H., Kobayashi, G., Sakuma, R., Fujii, T., Hayashi, N., Suzuki, T., Kanno, R., Takano, M., & Takada, J. (2014) Bacterial Nanometric Amorphous Fe-Based Oxide: A Potential Lithium-Ion Battery Anode Material. ACS Applied Materials , 6(8), 5374-5378. DOI: 10.1021/am500905y  

  • August 15, 2014
  • 08:31 AM
  • 100 views

Miscanthus to Play a Major Role in Iowa Agriculture

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

Agronomists at Iowa State University say that miscanthus, a perennial grass used for biofuel production, would deliver even better yields than once thought in Iowa.... Read more »

  • August 15, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 84 views

Did you hear the one about older adults being targeted for fraud?

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

Of course you did. But you may want to take a look at this study because, maybe, it isn’t true after all. It certainly is a well-known myth if it is not true. This appears to be one of those situations where we add up what we know and then come up with a conclusion […]

Related posts:
When it comes to corporate fraud in America, men are almost always to blame
Is it true that older jurors are more likely to convict?
Birthers, deathers, and did you hear about Jimmy Hoffa?


... Read more »

Ross, M, Grossman, I, & Schryer, E. (2014) Contrary to psychological and popular opinion, there is no compelling evidence that older adults are disproportionately victimized by consumer fraud. . Perspectives on Psychological Science. info:/

  • August 15, 2014
  • 05:19 AM
  • 49 views

We're happier when we chat to strangers, but our instinct is to ignore them

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

It's become a truism that humans are "social animals". And yet, you've probably noticed - people on public transport or in waiting rooms seem to do everything they can not to interact. On the London tube there's an unwritten rule not to even look at one another. This is the paradox explored by Nicholas Epley and Juliana Schroeder in a series of nine new studies involving members of the public on trains, planes, in taxis and a waiting room.The investigation began with rail and bus commuters ........ Read more »

Epley N, & Schroeder J. (2014) Mistakenly Seeking Solitude. Journal of experimental psychology. General. PMID: 25019381  

  • August 15, 2014
  • 04:07 AM
  • 106 views

Psychotic experience following childhood neurodevelopmental diagnosis

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

The paper by Golam Khandaker and colleagues [1] suggesting a higher risk of psychotic episodes (PEs) in early adolescence among those with a diagnosed childhood neurodevelopmental disorder (ND) makes for some interesting reading. Detailing several diagnoses as falling under the banner of neurodevelopmental disorder (autism spectrum, dyslexia, dyspraxia, dysgraphia, dysorthographia, dyscalculia), researchers concluded that: "The risk of PEs was higher in those with, compared with those witho........ Read more »

  • August 15, 2014
  • 02:00 AM
  • 19 views

Guidelines for HLRCC kidney cancer risk, surveillance and treatment published

by Lizzie Perdeaux in BHD Research Blog

Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC) is a rare kidney cancer susceptibility syndrome caused by autosomal dominant mutations in the FH gene. The three main symptoms of HLRCC are red skin papules called cutaneous piloleiomyomas; multiple early-onset uterine leiomyomas; … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • August 14, 2014
  • 08:27 PM
  • 126 views

Few but strong: dense tornado clusters on the rise in the United States

by Jonathan Trinastic in Goodnight Earth

Analysis of tornado frequency data over the last half-century shows that tornadoes are occurring on fewer days but with greater density and severity, indicating that climate change may be changing the local dynamics at play.... Read more »

JB Elsner, SC Elsner, TH Jagger. (2014) The increasing efficiency of tornado days in the United States. Climate Dynamics. info:/

  • August 14, 2014
  • 03:54 PM
  • 97 views

August 14, 2014

by Erin Campbell in HighMag Blog

Astrocytes used to be the red-headed stepchild of the neurology world, but no more! Once considered to be just filler material, astrocytes are now known to function in the development and function of synapses, though the mechanisms are unclear. Today’s stunning image is from a paper showing how astrocytes can stabilize synapses, possibly serving as an important component of learning and memory. The synapses of neurons in the central nervous system are dynamic in response to learning and m........ Read more »

Bernardinelli, Y., Randall, J., Janett, E., Nikonenko, I., König, S., Jones, E., Flores, C., Murai, K., Bochet, C., Holtmaat, A.... (2014) Activity-Dependent Structural Plasticity of Perisynaptic Astrocytic Domains Promotes Excitatory Synapse Stability. Current Biology, 24(15), 1679-1688. DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2014.06.025  

  • August 14, 2014
  • 03:35 PM
  • 144 views

Bringing the Fight to hidden HIV

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

We’ve got even more news for the HIV cure front. Yesterday we talked about broadly neutralizing antibodies, today we are going to be touching on that yet again,so if you […]... Read more »

Ariel Halper-Stromberg, Ching-Lan Lu, Florian Klein, Joshua A. Horwitz, Stylianos Bournazos, Lilian Nogueira, Thomas R. Eisenreich, Cassie Liu, Anna Gazumyan, Uwe Schaefer, Rebecca C. Furze, Michael S. Seaman.... (2014) Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies and Viral Inducers Decrease Rebound from HIV-1 Latent Reservoirs in Humanized Mice. Cell. info:/10.1016/j.cell.2014.07.043

  • August 14, 2014
  • 02:00 PM
  • 139 views

Dying To Make Us Laugh

by Mark E. Lasbury in The 'Scope

Robin William’s suicide was a tragic, but all too familiar happening amongst humorists of this period. New research is showing that comedians, performers in the arts, and even people with better senses of humor are prone to more health problems as adults. Depression , cardiovascular, pulmonary and stress related problem are not uncommon in comedians, and even children and adults that have better sense of humor are susceptible to obesity and cardiovascular disease.

The irony is that t........ Read more »

C.R. Epstein, R.J. Epstein. (2013) Death in The New York Times: the price of fame is a faster flame . QJM: monthly journal of the Association of Physicians, 106(6), 517-521. info:/

Greengross G. (2013) Humor and aging - a mini-review. Gerontology, 59(5), 448-53. PMID: 23689078  

Bennett MP, & Lengacher C. (2009) Humor and Laughter May Influence Health IV. Humor and Immune Function. Evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine : eCAM, 6(2), 159-64. PMID: 18955287  

  • August 14, 2014
  • 01:55 PM
  • 107 views

Getting High On Life

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

Living organisms can survive and thrive in all kinds of rough environments. This would include the edges of space. There are bird species that can fly at almost 40,000 ft., as high as the highest clouds. New research is showing just how the bar headed goose is able to fly when the air is thin and the oxygen is scarce. But more impressive are the bacteria. They can actually live their whole lives in the air, dividing and growing nearly 25 miles (41 km) above the surface of the Earth. A study from........ Read more »

Pawar SP, Dhotre DP, Shetty SA, Chowdhury SP, Chaudhari BL, & Shouche YS. (2012) Genome sequence of Janibacter hoylei MTCC8307, isolated from the stratospheric air. Journal of bacteriology, 194(23), 6629-30. PMID: 23144385  

Hawkes LA, Balachandran S, Batbayar N, Butler PJ, Chua B, Douglas DC, Frappell PB, Hou Y, Milsom WK, Newman SH.... (2013) The paradox of extreme high-altitude migration in bar-headed geese Anser indicus. Proceedings. Biological sciences / The Royal Society, 280(1750), 20122114. PMID: 23118436  

  • August 14, 2014
  • 12:20 PM
  • 93 views

Video Tip of the Week: EpiViz Genome Browsing (and more)

by Mary in OpenHelix

This is the browser I’ve been waiting for. Stop what you are doing right now and look at EpiViz. I’ll wait.

I spend a lot of time looking at visualizations of various types of -omics data, from a number of different sources. I’ve never believed in the “one browser to rule them all” sort of thing–I think it’s important for groups to focus on special areas of data collection, curation, and visualizion. Although some parts can be reused and shared, of co........ Read more »

Chelaru Florin, Smith Llewellyn, Goldstein Naomi, & Bravo Héctor Corrada. (2014) Epiviz: interactive visual analytics for functional genomics data. Nature methods. PMID: 25086505  

  • August 14, 2014
  • 12:10 PM
  • 112 views

HIV Vaccine One Step Closer to Reality

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

The war on HIV, that tricky little guy has avoided every thing we could throw at it in a broad sense. Sure a few people here and there get lucky, but we have yet to actually make any sort of we're going to kick your ass headway [don't worry it's the technical term for it]. That is hopefully going to change with a new scientific discovery that has enormous implications for HIV vaccine development. Researchers have uncovered novel properties of special HIV antibodies that promise to........ Read more »

  • August 14, 2014
  • 11:17 AM
  • 93 views

FDA Approves Novel Insomnia Drug Suvorexant (Belsomra)

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

Regular readers of this blog had a heads up last year on the development of orexin receptor antagonists for the treatment of insomnia.I posted a review of an Italian clinical drug trial in humans with insomnia paired with polysomnography. This study used three different doses of a orexin receptor antagonist (10 mg 30 mg and 60 mg).In a second post, I reviewed a sleep lab study of the effects of an orexin antagonist drug compared to zolpidem (Ambien) on sleep architecture.This second study found ........ Read more »

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