Post List

  • October 5, 2014
  • 05:09 PM
  • 92 views

The Playing Ground Part Two

by Rodney Steadman in Gravity's Pull

Does the removal of park benches from a playground increase physical activity in adults and children?... Read more »

  • October 5, 2014
  • 01:43 PM
  • 113 views

Using “Programmable” Antibiotics to Attack Drug-Resistant Microbes

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

The body is pretty great at self regulation, that is up until it isn't. The antibiotic era was one that improved human health hundreds of times over. Unfortunately health is a joint effort, a multitude of microbes scientists have found populating the human body have good, bad and mostly mysterious implications for our health. But when something goes wrong, we defend ourselves with the undiscriminating brute force of traditional antibiotics, which wipe out everything at once like a wild fire, reg........ Read more »

Luciano Marraffini et al. (2014) Exploiting CRISPR-Cas nucleases to produce sequence-specific antimicrobials. Nature Biotechnology. info:/10.1038/nbt.3043

  • October 5, 2014
  • 04:30 AM
  • 95 views

Pain needs painkillers – right?

by DJMac in Recovery Review

Overprescribing of opioid painkillers has caused harm to many people including addiction, loss of social functioning and, increasingly though still relatively uncommonly in the UK, to death. Concerns have been raised about deaths associated with tramadol. I’ve written before about the lack of evidence of effectiveness for opiates in chronic pain, but it is hard for [...]
The post Pain needs painkillers – right? appeared first on Recovery Review.
... Read more »

  • October 5, 2014
  • 04:00 AM
  • 99 views

I’m so easily distr….oooh look! Shiny!

by Bronwyn Thompson in Healthskills: Skills for Healthy Living

Wouldn’t it be great if there was a simple way to help people avoid focusing on their pain, allowing them to just watch a TV programme or something, and not be bothered by some painful procedure? This is a dream for those health professionals who have to carry out painful procedures like take blood, drill teeth, change dressings, stretch body parts and so on. It’s also an area of great interest for researchers, because studying how distraction affects our experience of pain shows us ........ Read more »

Schreiber, K., Campbell, C., Martel, M., Greenbaum, S., Wasan, A., Borsook, D., Jamison, R., & Edwards, R. (2014) Distraction Analgesia in Chronic Pain Patients. Anesthesiology, 1. DOI: 10.1097/ALN.0000000000000465  

  • October 4, 2014
  • 02:47 PM
  • 125 views

The Path of Antibiotic Resistance

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

MRSA, not that long ago we had no idea what MRSA was… mostly because it hadn’t come into prevalence. With an increase in the use and abuse of antibiotics there has been an ever growing pressure for the pathogens we treat to mutate in order to survive, this pressure is called selective pressure and helped cause drug-resistance in pathogens. In response to the rise of these drug-resistant pathogens, doctors are routinely cautioned against over prescribing antimicrobials. But when a patient has........ Read more »

Kouyos RD, Metcalf CJ, Birger R, Klein EY, Abel Zur Wiesch P, Ankomah P, Arinaminpathy N, Bogich TL, Bonhoeffer S, Brower C.... (2014) The path of least resistance: aggressive or moderate treatment?. Proceedings. Biological sciences / The Royal Society, 281(1794). PMID: 25253451  

  • October 4, 2014
  • 11:33 AM
  • 42 views

The Underwear Fetish Brain?

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

According to a Japanese case report, a man developed a fetish for women’s underwear due to decreased brain blood flow. Here’s how neuropsychiatrists Koji Masuda and colleagues describe the patient: A 24-year-old male patient who was arrested for stealing underwear and referred to our hospital for evaluation. The patient had stolen women’s underwear on multiple […]The post The Underwear Fetish Brain? appeared first on Neuroskeptic.... Read more »

Koji Masuda, Yoshinobu Ishitobi, Yoshihiro Tanaka, & Jotao Akiyoshi. (2014) Underwear fetishism induced by bilaterally decreased cerebral bloodflow in the temporo-occipital lobe. BMJ Case Rep. info:/

  • October 4, 2014
  • 04:57 AM
  • 119 views

The gut-brain axis and schizophrenia

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

A micropost to direct your attention to the recent paper by Katlyn Nemani and colleagues [1] titled: 'Schizophrenia and the gut-brain axis'. Mentioning words like that, I couldn't resist offering a little exposure to this review and opinion piece, drawing on what seems to be some renewed research interest in work started by pioneers such as the late Curt Dohan [2].The usual triad of gastrointestinal (GI) variables - gut barrier, gut bacteria and gut immune function - are mentioned in the article........ Read more »

Nemani, K., Ghomi, R., McCormick, B., & Fan, X. (2014) Schizophrenia and the gut–brain axis. Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry. DOI: 10.1016/j.pnpbp.2014.08.018  

  • October 3, 2014
  • 06:46 PM
  • 78 views

Tough decisions for the developing brain

by Misato Iwashita in the Node

To form complex organs, somatic stem cells proliferate and then differentiate during development. In this process, intrinsic factors, i.e. the sequential expression of transcriptional genes, and extrinsic factors, i.e. extracellular microenvironment, are intimately involved. Recent in vitro studies have revealed that the physical properties of the extracellular niche, possibly tissue stiffness, may play an important […]... Read more »

  • October 3, 2014
  • 05:24 PM
  • 128 views

The Neurobiological Basis of a Human-Pet Relationship

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

My wife adores our cats. Now, I'm not a cat person, but my wife loves them. In fact if we had children and someone held a gun to her head and said choose between the kid or the cats, there would likely be an uncomfortable amount of time before a response. The big question is, why do we love animals like we do our own children? Well a small study helps try to answer this complex question by investigating differences in how important brain structures are activated when women view images of their c........ Read more »

  • October 3, 2014
  • 04:01 PM
  • 120 views

Sleeping Brains Understand Words

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

Have you ever heard someone describe a task as being so easy that they ‘could do it in their sleep’? A fascinating new study from a team of French neuroscientists shows that this statement may be literally true, far more often than you’d think: Inducing Task-Relevant Responses to Speech in the Sleeping Brain Sid Kouider […]The post Sleeping Brains Understand Words appeared first on Neuroskeptic.... Read more »

Kouider S, Andrillon T, Barbosa LS, Goupil L, & Bekinschtein TA. (2014) Inducing task-relevant responses to speech in the sleeping brain. Current Biology, 24(18), 2208-14. PMID: 25220055  

  • October 3, 2014
  • 11:55 AM
  • 86 views

Tricksy insects sing a song of love and deceit

by neuroecology in Neuroecology

Beyond a spider snacking on an unfortunate fly, the social lives of insects tend to go unrecognized. Perhaps you notice all the ants marching in a line, or bees heading back to a nest, but it all seems so mechanical, so primal. … Continue reading →... Read more »

Nakano, R., Ihara, F., Mishiro, K., Toyama, M., & Toda, S. (2014) Double meaning of courtship song in a moth. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 281(1789), 20140840-20140840. DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2014.0840  

  • October 3, 2014
  • 11:00 AM
  • 97 views

How the brain encodes massive spaces

by Sick Papes in Sick Papes

Rich, P., Liaw, H., & Lee, A. (2014). Large environments reveal the statistical structure governing hippocampal representations. Science, 345 (6198), 814-817 DOI: 10.1126/science.1255635

Have you ever felt lost and alone? If so, this experience probably involved your hippocampus, a seahorse-shaped structure in the middle of the brain. About 40 years ago, scientists with electrodes discovered that some neurons in the hippocampus fire each time an animal passes through a particular location in ........ Read more »

  • October 3, 2014
  • 10:38 AM
  • 94 views

Pediatric respiratory tract infections and antibiotics: overprescribing?

by Aurelie in Coffee break Science

Antimicrobial resistance is a serious threat to human health. As the WHO global report published in April 2014 highlighted, it is no longer a concern for the future but happening right now, in every part of the world. It threatens … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • October 3, 2014
  • 10:38 AM
  • 94 views

Breaking Research: Aging can be delayed in fruit flies by activating AMPK in the gut

by Bethany Christmann in Fly on the Wall

How can we slow or even halt the steady march of aging? In a previous post, I reviewed a paper that asked “What causes aging?” (the prevailing hypothesis is that aging is caused by accumulating cell damage). Understanding why we age is important for developing ways to interfere with the process. But there are other […]... Read more »

  • October 3, 2014
  • 10:02 AM
  • 94 views

How to Say “SOS” in Catfish

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish

It’s good to have a plan in case of emergency. If there’s a fire, take the stairs to the ground floor. If a bird tries to eat you, say “ERK ERK ERK” by grinding your spine bone against your shoulder bone until it drops you. That latter one will work best if you’re a certain […]The post How to Say “SOS” in Catfish appeared first on Inkfish.... Read more »

  • October 3, 2014
  • 09:46 AM
  • 113 views

Did a five-day camp without digital devices really boost children's interpersonal skills?

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

"There's a brilliant study that came out two weeks ago," Baroness Professor Susan Greenfield said at a recent event promoting her new book, "... they took away all [the pre-teens'] digital devices for five days and sent them to summer camp ... and tested their interpersonal skills, and guess what, even within five days they'd changed."Greenfield highlighted this study in the context of her dire warnings about the harmful psychological effects of modern screen- and internet-based technologies. Sh........ Read more »

  • October 3, 2014
  • 08:40 AM
  • 103 views

The Friday Five for 10/3/2014

by Bill Sullivan in The 'Scope

The coolest science of the week, including the physics of space battles, leeches eating worms, and how to get others to do your bidding!... Read more »

O'Shea TJ, Cryan PM, Cunningham AA, Fooks AR, Hayman DT, Luis AD, Peel AJ, Plowright RK, & Wood JL. (2014) Bat flight and zoonotic viruses. Emerging infectious diseases, 20(5), 741-5. PMID: 24750692  

  • October 3, 2014
  • 05:17 AM
  • 86 views

Routine screening of lung resections taken during surgery for pneumothorax may help identify unrecognised cases of BHD

by Lizzie Perdeaux in BHD Research Blog

In many cases, early diagnosis means treatments are more effective, cost less and save more lives. Screening programmes aid early diagnosis and can be used to screen whole populations, such as the fetal anomaly screening given to all pregnant women … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • October 3, 2014
  • 05:10 AM
  • 116 views

S100B and schizophrenia meta-analysed

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

I don't know if it's just me but this year (2014) I seem to be covering a lot more meta-analysis papers on this blog. I assume that's because of the increasing volume of peer-reviewed research being created year-on-year leading to greater volumes of research fodder for such grand reviews. Whatever the reason(s), there are some really interesting conclusions being reached in that literature as per the meta-analysis by Aleksovska and colleagues [1] (open-access) focusing on S100B bl........ Read more »

  • October 2, 2014
  • 07:46 PM
  • 111 views

Ambivalence and Eating Disorders: Inpatient Treatment, Belonging, and Identity

by Andrea in Science of Eating Disorders


When Tetyana Tweeted and “Tumblr-ed” (is there a better name for putting something on Tumblr?) a quote from a qualitative research article about ambivalence and eating disorders, I knew I would want write a blog post about it. Of course, life happened, and so this post is coming a little later than I had intended. Nonetheless, I am happy to be sharing a post about a fresh article by Karin Eli (2014) about eating disorders and ambivalence in the inpatient hospital setting. The article i........ Read more »

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