Post List

  • October 3, 2014
  • 08:40 AM
  • 103 views

The Friday Five for 10/3/2014

by Bill Sullivan in The 'Scope

The coolest science of the week, including the physics of space battles, leeches eating worms, and how to get others to do your bidding!... Read more »

O'Shea TJ, Cryan PM, Cunningham AA, Fooks AR, Hayman DT, Luis AD, Peel AJ, Plowright RK, & Wood JL. (2014) Bat flight and zoonotic viruses. Emerging infectious diseases, 20(5), 741-5. PMID: 24750692  

  • October 3, 2014
  • 05:17 AM
  • 85 views

Routine screening of lung resections taken during surgery for pneumothorax may help identify unrecognised cases of BHD

by Lizzie Perdeaux in BHD Research Blog

In many cases, early diagnosis means treatments are more effective, cost less and save more lives. Screening programmes aid early diagnosis and can be used to screen whole populations, such as the fetal anomaly screening given to all pregnant women … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • October 3, 2014
  • 05:10 AM
  • 110 views

S100B and schizophrenia meta-analysed

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

I don't know if it's just me but this year (2014) I seem to be covering a lot more meta-analysis papers on this blog. I assume that's because of the increasing volume of peer-reviewed research being created year-on-year leading to greater volumes of research fodder for such grand reviews. Whatever the reason(s), there are some really interesting conclusions being reached in that literature as per the meta-analysis by Aleksovska and colleagues [1] (open-access) focusing on S100B bl........ Read more »

  • October 2, 2014
  • 07:46 PM
  • 109 views

Ambivalence and Eating Disorders: Inpatient Treatment, Belonging, and Identity

by Andrea in Science of Eating Disorders


When Tetyana Tweeted and “Tumblr-ed” (is there a better name for putting something on Tumblr?) a quote from a qualitative research article about ambivalence and eating disorders, I knew I would want write a blog post about it. Of course, life happened, and so this post is coming a little later than I had intended. Nonetheless, I am happy to be sharing a post about a fresh article by Karin Eli (2014) about eating disorders and ambivalence in the inpatient hospital setting. The article i........ Read more »

  • October 2, 2014
  • 06:16 PM
  • 135 views

Living on the edge: graphene quantum dots perform as well as platinum in fuel cell electrodes

by Jonathan Trinastic in Goodnight Earth

Down with platinum! New research out of Rice University shows that graphene quantum dots attached to graphene oxide sheets perform as well as platinum in fuel cell electrodes. And they're much cheaper!... Read more »

  • October 2, 2014
  • 05:04 PM
  • 161 views

The Mysterious Origins of HIV Discovered

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

There have been a lot of theories on where HIV came from, anywhere from the mundane, it spread from other animals. To the down right crazy, the government created it to wipe out homosexuals. Well bad news for conspiracy theorists, a new study suggests that the HIV pandemic with us today is almost certain to have begun its global spread from Kinshasa, the capital of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC).... Read more »

Nuno R. Faria1, Andrew Rambaut, Marc A. Suchard, Guy Baele, Trevor Bedford, Melissa J. Ward, Andrew J. Tatem, João D. Sousa, Nimalan Arinaminpathy, Jacques Pépin,.... (2014) The early spread and epidemic ignition of HIV-1 in human populations. Science. info:/10.1126/science.1256739

  • October 2, 2014
  • 02:01 PM
  • 42 views

Survivin: You wouldn’t be alive without it

by Clay Clark in Biochem Blogs

  Enzymes perform numerous tasks in order to contribute to the global goal of organism survival. One such enzyme is Survivin. Survivin wears many “hats” within the cell and is a vital part of cellular homeostasis. Here I will introduce you to two of the main processes Survivin regulates. Survivin is a multifunctional protein involved […]... Read more »

  • October 2, 2014
  • 11:01 AM
  • 127 views

Parenting: Genetics and Environmental Effects

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

Effective parenting is a key element in child development.Both genetic and environmental factors appear to contribute to the cognitive, emotional and behavioral aspects of parenting.Childhood temperament also influences the process of parenting. A well-behaved, emotionally stable and loving child is obviously much easier to parent than a child with behavioral and emotional problems.Bonamy Oliver and colleagues from the United Kingdom have recently published an informative twin study of pare........ Read more »

Oliver BR, Trzaskowski M, & Plomin R. (2014) Genetics of parenting: The power of the dark side. Developmental psychology, 50(4), 1233-40. PMID: 24364831  

  • October 2, 2014
  • 09:30 AM
  • 15 views

Gamifying Surveys to Increase Completion Rate and Data Quality

by Richard Landers in NeoAcademic

One of the biggest challenges for research involving surveys is maintaining a high rate of completion and compliance with survey requirements. First, we want a reasonably representative sample of whomever we send the survey to. Second, we want those that do complete the survey to do so honestly and thoughtfully. One approach that researchers have taken to […]The post Gamifying Surveys to Increase Completion Rate and Data Quality appeared first on NeoAcademic.Related articles from NeoAcad........ Read more »

  • October 2, 2014
  • 08:03 AM
  • 121 views

Coeliac disease risk not affected by early feeding practices

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

I'd like to bring three papers to your attention, all united by their discussion of coeliac (celiac) disease, that most classic of autoimmune conditions in the most part managed by the use of a lifelong gluten-free diet.First up are the papers by Elena Lionetti and colleagues [1] and Sabine Vriezinga and colleagues [2] which unfortunately pour cold water on the notion that the risk of developing coeliac disease (CD) can be somehow mitigated via the use of either the early or delayed in........ Read more »

Lionetti E, Castellaneta S, Francavilla R, Pulvirenti A, Tonutti E, Amarri S, Barbato M, Barbera C, Barera G, Bellantoni A.... (2014) Introduction of Gluten, HLA Status, and the Risk of Celiac Disease in Children. The New England journal of medicine, 371(14), 1295-1303. PMID: 25271602  

Vriezinga SL, Auricchio R, Bravi E, Castillejo G, Chmielewska A, Crespo Escobar P, Kolaček S, Koletzko S, Korponay-Szabo IR, Mummert E.... (2014) Randomized Feeding Intervention in Infants at High Risk for Celiac Disease. The New England journal of medicine, 371(14), 1304-1315. PMID: 25271603  

  • October 2, 2014
  • 06:37 AM
  • 118 views

What do sperm have to do with brain tumors?

by pknoepfler in the Node

  This post was originally published in the Knoepfler Lab Stem Cell Blog.      Sometimes in science there are unexpected threads tying seemingly very different things together. Unraveling the knots in these threads can lead to new insights into important developmental processes and mechanisms of disease. My lab studies epigenomic and transcription factors including […]... Read more »

Yuen, B., Bush, K., Barrilleaux, B., Cotterman, R., & Knoepfler, P. (2014) Histone H3.3 regulates dynamic chromatin states during spermatogenesis. Development, 141(18), 3483-3494. DOI: 10.1242/dev.106450  

  • October 2, 2014
  • 06:07 AM
  • 74 views

Most people think CEOs are paid too much

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

Tim Cook, CEO of Apple Inc, attends the 2013 Allen & Co conference.It's often assumed that a desire to reduce income inequality is held only by people on lower pay, or by those who endorse left-wing views. However, a new study of over 55,000 people (average age 47; 55 per cent were female) across 40 countries on 6 continents finds a universal desire to reduce the gap between the highest and lowest paid workers. The authors, Sorapop Kiatpongsan and Michael Norton, say their results "offer gui........ Read more »

Sorapop Kiatpongsan and Michael I. Norton. (2014) How Much (More) Should CEOs Make? A Universal Desire for More Equal Pay. Perspectives on Psychological Science. info:/

  • October 2, 2014
  • 06:00 AM
  • 5 views

6 Tooth Found in Fossil Leg Bone Is ‘First Evidence’ of Clash Between Ancient Apex Predators

by Blake de Pastino in Western Digs

A tooth found embedded in a fossil leg bone is evidence of an unlikely battle between two top predators in the American Southwest some 220 million years ago — one of them hunted on land, the other lived in the water.... Read more »

  • October 2, 2014
  • 05:19 AM
  • 74 views

How does the psychology of ownership differ between Western and Eastern cultures?

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

Michael Jackson's glove sold for $350,000 at a New York auction in 2009. In India,celebrity possessions are not valued so highly. By guest blogger Bruce Hood.Many of us are nostalgic for original, authentic experiences and prepared to pay for them. For example, not so long ago vinyl records were ubiquitous but nowadays they are considered collectibles, with some attracting a high price. Even with the most mundane record, there is still a tangible tactile experience to possessing these ........ Read more »

  • October 2, 2014
  • 04:57 AM
  • 95 views

Volatile organic compounds and autism

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

As harsh as the phrase volatile organic compounds (VOCs) might appear at first glance, all this refers to is a class of compounds containing carbon which have a tendency to evaporate at room temperature assuming normal air pressure. VOCs have been associated with pollutants as per their inclusion in various literature on the topic of things like indoor air pollution (see here) and the fact that just about everything around us in the modern home or office is likely to release VOCs. Whilst not try........ Read more »

  • October 2, 2014
  • 04:52 AM
  • 99 views

JUST PUBLISHED: A Trial to Evaluate the Efficacy of an Integrated Smoking Cessation Intervention among Mental Health Patients

by Mark Rubin in The University of Newcastle's School of Psychology Newsline

Depending on diagnosis and setting, between 33 and 90 per cent of people with mental illness smoke tobacco, both in Australia and worldwide. As a result, tobacco-related diseases are one of the leading causes of mortality among this population subgroup. A paucity of research to date has examined the efficacy of cessation strategies to assist people with mental illness to quit smoking. However, limited findings have suggested that aids that have been found to be effective for the general populati........ Read more »

  • October 1, 2014
  • 02:23 PM
  • 120 views

MERS-CoV: update 2.0

by thelonevirologist in Virology Tidbits

Five different fragments of MERS-CoV S1 receptor binding domain were tested for their receptor affinity and an ability to induce the formation of neutralizing antibodies. Results suggest that the induction of high antibody titers is dependent on the absence of extended N- and C-terminal ends. ... Read more »

Wang N, Shi X, Jiang L, Zhang S, Wang D, Tong P, Guo D, Fu L, Cui Y, Liu X.... (2013) Structure of MERS-CoV spike receptor-binding domain complexed with human receptor DPP4. Cell research, 23(8), 986-93. PMID: 23835475  

  • October 1, 2014
  • 02:17 PM
  • 110 views

What Encourages People to Walk Their Dog?

by CAPB in Companion Animal Psychology Blog

And is dog-walking a good way to persuade people to take more exercise?Photo: Monkey Business Images / ShutterstockWe know that most people do not get the 150 minutes of exercise per week that is recommended. Could encouraging people to walk their dogs more often help, and if so, how best to go about it? A new paper by Carri Westgarth et al (2014) of the University of Liverpool reviews the state of current research.Although to some dog owners a daily walk is an essential part of the routine, the........ Read more »

  • October 1, 2014
  • 01:41 PM
  • 129 views

The Ever Plastic Brain and Intellectual Disabilities

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

The plasticity of the brain is always somewhat of a shock. It's near incredible what the brain can achieve, look at people who have strokes, or any other sort of brain injury and yet still somehow manage to get up and move, or perform tasks. So I guess it should be no surprise, but still amazing that studying mice with a genetic change similar to what is found in Kabuki syndrome (an inherited disease of humans) researchers report they have used an anticancer drug to improve mental function......... Read more »

Hans T. Bjornsson, Joel S. Benjamin, Li Zhang, Jacqueline Weissman, Elizabeth E. Gerber, Yi-Chun Chen, Rebecca G. Vaurio, Michelle C. Potter, Kasper D. Hansen, & Harry C. Dietz. (2014) Histone deacetylase inhibition rescues structural and functional brain deficits in a mouse model of Kabuki syndrome. Science Translational Medicine. info:/10.1126/scitranslmed.3009278

  • October 1, 2014
  • 09:46 AM
  • 105 views

Video Tip of the Week: MEGA, Molecular Evolutionary Genetics Analysis

by Mary in OpenHelix

This week’s tip of the week highlights the MEGA tools–MEGA is a collection of tools that perform Molecular Evolutionary Genetics Analysis. MEGA tools are not new–they’ve been developed and supported over many years. In fact, on their landing page you can see the first reference to MEGA was in 1994. How much computing were you […]... Read more »

join us!

Do you write about peer-reviewed research in your blog? Use ResearchBlogging.org to make it easy for your readers — and others from around the world — to find your serious posts about academic research.

If you don't have a blog, you can still use our site to learn about fascinating developments in cutting-edge research from around the world.

Register Now

Research Blogging is powered by SMG Technology.

To learn more, visit seedmediagroup.com.