Post List

  • November 7, 2014
  • 07:39 PM
  • 124 views

Friends with Benefits

by Abena Edugyan in Your Active Edge

Two studies that look at motivation and physical activity. ... Read more »

Janssen, I., Dugan, S., Karavolos, K., Lynch, E., & Powell, L. (2013) Correlates of 15-Year Maintenance of Physical Activity in Middle-Aged Women. International Journal of Behavioral Medicine., 21(3), 511-518. DOI: 10.1007/s12529-013-9324-z  

  • November 7, 2014
  • 04:50 PM
  • 43 views

It hurts! Atheists and Christians don’t feel each others pain, but with a twist.

by Tom Rees in Epiphenom

For many people, their religion is like a badge of social identity. You feel an affinity with people who share a religion – not surprising given that you will share many cultural and social touch points. But will you feel their pain? If shown a picture of a Christian grimacing, will you mentally flinch? What about [Read More...]

... Read more »

  • November 7, 2014
  • 10:37 AM
  • 141 views

Breaking Research: A method by which invading bacteria avoid detection could also be our key to defeating them

by Bethany Christmann in Fly on the Wall

Have you ever wondered how our body recognizes when it’s being invaded by harmful bacteria? Nearly all forms of life—from single-celled organisms all the way to humans—have an “innate” immune system, which has evolved to recognize cellular components shared by broad groups of pathogens. One such example is peptidoglycan, a molecule found on the cell […]... Read more »

Atilano Magda Luciana, Filipa Vaz, Maria João Catalão, Patricia Reed, Inês Ramos Grilo, Rita Gonçalves Sobral, Petros Ligoxygakis, Mariana Gomes Pinho, & Sérgio Raposo Filipe. (2014) Bacterial autolysins trim cell surface peptidoglycan to prevent detection by the Drosophila innate immune system. eLife. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/elife.02277  

  • November 7, 2014
  • 10:05 AM
  • 105 views

The Friday Five for 11/7/14

by Bill Sullivan in The 'Scope

A fun way to learn the latest cool science news! Crazy science stunts, the chemistry of fire breathing, bugs in the brain.... Read more »

Yolken, R., Jones-Brando, L., Dunigan, D., Kannan, G., Dickerson, F., Severance, E., Sabunciyan, S., Talbot, C., Prandovszky, E., Gurnon, J.... (2014) Chlorovirus ATCV-1 is part of the human oropharyngeal virome and is associated with changes in cognitive functions in humans and mice. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1418895111  

  • November 7, 2014
  • 10:01 AM
  • 99 views

Powerful Ravens Sabotage Others’ Relationships

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish

  If we’re lucky, this is behavior we haven’t seen since high school. The coolest individuals can’t stand to see others gaining social status, so they cut down any peers who are starting to elevate themselves. Ravens have to live with this behavior all the time. When the top-dog birds see others building new relationships, […]The post Powerful Ravens Sabotage Others’ Relationships appeared first on Inkfish.... Read more »

Massen, J., Szipl, G., Spreafico, M., & Bugnyar, T. (2014) Ravens Intervene in Others’ Bonding Attempts. Current Biology. DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2014.09.073  

  • November 7, 2014
  • 09:01 AM
  • 117 views

You can tell a lot from looking at someone’s face…

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

Our mock jurors (and many others as well) tend to believe the eyes are the “window to the soul” and that by simply looking at the eyes of another, they can intuit truthfulness and character. But it can be even easier! Just look at the face and you can actually assess introversion/extroversion, competence/incompetence, dominance/submission, and […]

Related posts:
I can tell from your face that you are suicidal
Never trust a man with a wide face
Wearing your religion on your face


... Read more »

Olivola, C., Funk, F., & Todorov, A. (2014) Social attributions from faces bias human choices. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 18(11), 566-570. DOI: 10.1016/j.tics.2014.09.007  

  • November 7, 2014
  • 08:04 AM
  • 57 views

When we get depressed, we lose our ability to go with our gut instincts

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

People who are depressed often complain that they find it difficult to make decisions. A new study provides an explanation. Carina Remmers and her colleagues tested 29 patients diagnosed with major depression and 27 healthy controls and they found that the people with depression had an impaired ability to go with their gut instincts, or what we might call intuition.Intuition is not an easy skill to measure. The researchers' approach was to present participants with triads of words (e.g. SALT DEE........ Read more »

Remmers C, Topolinski S, Dietrich DE, & Michalak J. (2014) Impaired intuition in patients with major depressive disorder. The British journal of clinical psychology / the British Psychological Society. PMID: 25307321  

  • November 7, 2014
  • 04:11 AM
  • 135 views

Treating depression: exercise or anti-inflammatory meds?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Reiterating my primary caveat on this blog about not giving anything that looks, sounds or smells like medical and/or clinical advice, I'm bringing three papers to the research blogging table today, all published in the JAMA journal family and all talking about depression / depressive symptoms.See my hat... @ Wikipedia First up is the paper by Ole Köhler and colleagues [1] reviewing "the antidepressant and possible adverse effects of anti-inflammatory interventions". Some media i........ Read more »

Ole Köhler, Michael E. Benros, Merete Nordentoft, Michael E. Farkouh, Rupa L. Iyengar, Ole Mors, & Jesper Krogh. (2014) Effect of Anti-inflammatory Treatment on Depression, Depressive Symptoms, and Adverse Effects. JAMA Psychiatry. info:/doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2014.1611

Snehal M. Pinto Pereira, Marie-Claude Geoffroy, & Christine Power. (2014) Depressive Symptoms and Physical Activity During 3 Decades in Adult Life. JAMA Psychiatry. info:/doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2014.1240

Toseeb, U., Brage, S., Corder, K., Dunn, V., Jones, P., Owens, M., St Clair, M., van Sluijs, E., & Goodyer, I. (2014) Exercise and Depressive Symptoms in Adolescents. JAMA Pediatrics. DOI: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2014.1794  

  • November 7, 2014
  • 03:00 AM
  • 83 views

Cohort study describes the kidney tumour characteristics of 33 BHD patients

by Lizzie Perdeaux in BHD Research Blog

In order to determine the characteristics of renal cell carcinomas (RCC) in BHD patients, Benusiglio et al. (2014) recruited 124 French BHD patients from Hôpital Bicêtre near Paris, and the Edouard Herriot University Hospital in Lyon. Of the patients recruited, … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • November 6, 2014
  • 09:42 PM
  • 102 views

Diving into Energy Drinks

by Wiley Asia Blog in Wiley Asia Blog - Life Sciences

How much do you know about energy drinks? We always consume energy drinks to boost our mood in general and to enhance our physical endurance. Being consumed since 1960s in Europe and Asia, we are uncertain about the side effects that energy drinks could produce.

While energy drinks are consumed by general consumers, teenagers and young adults are targeted group of consumers. The researchers analysed various ingredients that usually contain in energy drinks as well as the market size and safet........ Read more »

  • November 6, 2014
  • 09:21 PM
  • 104 views

Pareidolia Killed the Paranormal Star

by Rodney Steadman in Gravity's Pull

How pareidolia and priming influences electronic voice phenomena or EVP.... Read more »

  • November 6, 2014
  • 05:53 PM
  • 138 views

A Possible Genetic “Cure” for HIV… Maybe

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Let’s face it, a cure for HIV probably won’t be coming around for awhile. That slippery little virus manages to avoid everything we throw at it. Well researchers at Massachusetts General (MGH) and Boston Children’s hospitals (BCH) tried to take another crack at the problem. For the first time they have used a relatively new gene-editing technique to create what could prove to be an effective technique for blocking HIV from invading and destroying patients’ immune systems.... Read more »

Mandal, P., Ferreira, L., Collins, R., Meissner, T., Boutwell, C., Friesen, M., Vrbanac, V., Garrison, B., Stortchevoi, A., Bryder, D.... (2014) Efficient Ablation of Genes in Human Hematopoietic Stem and Effector Cells using CRISPR/Cas9. Cell Stem Cell, 15(5), 643-652. DOI: 10.1016/j.stem.2014.10.004  

  • November 6, 2014
  • 05:39 PM
  • 80 views

The Inherent Limits of MRI Tractography?

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

A popular neuroscience tool, diffusion MRI tractography, may fundamentally have limited accuracy. That’s according to a paper just published in PNAS: Anatomical accuracy of brain connections derived from diffusion MRI tractography is inherently limited The authors, Cibu Thomas and colleagues of Bethesda, Maryland, begin by explaining why diffusion MRI is so widely used The creation […]The post The Inherent Limits of MRI Tractography? appeared first on Neuroskeptic.... Read more »

Thomas C, Ye FQ, Irfanoglu MO, Modi P, Saleem KS, Leopold DA, & Pierpaoli C. (2014) Anatomical accuracy of brain connections derived from diffusion MRI tractography is inherently limited. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. PMID: 25368179  

  • November 6, 2014
  • 04:04 PM
  • 89 views

Researchers Design Cyborg Cockroaches for Search and Rescue Missions

by beredim in Strange Animals

Cyborg CockroachCredit: Eric Whitmire.Researchers at the North Carolina State University (NCSU) issued a press release today announcing that they have developed "cyborg" cockroaches with electronic circuit boards strapped to their backs. The cyborg cockroaches (or biobots) can be used to pick up sounds with their attached microphones and seek out their source.Hopefully, the technology will one day help emergency personnel to find and rescue survivors in the aftermath of disasters, like earthquak........ Read more »

Tahmid Latif, Eric Whitmire, Tristan Novak, and Alper Bozkurt. (2014) Towards Fenceless Boundaries for Solar Powered Insect Biobots. Aug. 28 at 36th Annual International IEEE EMBS Conference, Chicago, Illinois . info:/

  • November 6, 2014
  • 01:10 PM
  • 81 views

Silky Anteater

by beredim in Strange Animals

Silky AnteaterCredit: Instituto Nacional de Biodiversidad Costa Rica (INBio) (CC BY-NC-SA 3.0)Kingdom: AnimaliaPhylum: ChordataClass: MammaliaSuperorder: XenarthraOrder: PilosaSuborder:  VermilinguaFamily: CyclopedidaeGenus: CyclopesSpecies: Cyclopes didactylusConservation Status: Least Concern (Not Threatened)Common Name(s): Silky anteater, Pygmy anteater, Dwarf anteater, Two-toed anteaterThis cute, squirrel-sized critter is a silky anteater, the world’s smallest ante........ Read more »

  • November 6, 2014
  • 11:24 AM
  • 86 views

Eating Disorder Recovery In a Non-Normative Body

by Andrea in Science of Eating Disorders


Do you think it is easier for someone to recover from an ED when they have a more normative or stereotypically desirable body? Versus, say, an obese person who will never stop hearing extremely triggering stuff about their body type everywhere they turn? . . .
This post was originally written in response to the above question that was posed to Tetyana on the SEDs Tumblr (you can see the full question and Tetyana’s response here).
This is an interesting and timely question, and on........ Read more »

  • November 6, 2014
  • 09:30 AM
  • 100 views

Infants Can Tell If You’re a Reliable Informant

by amikulak in Daily Observations

It’s hard to know how babies think, since they’re still getting a handle on language skills.  One strategy that researchers use to gain some insight is eye tracking, which allows […]... Read more »

Tummeltshammer, K., Wu, R., Sobel, D., & Kirkham, N. (2014) Infants Track the Reliability of Potential Informants. Psychological Science, 25(9), 1730-1738. DOI: 10.1177/0956797614540178  

  • November 6, 2014
  • 09:25 AM
  • 111 views

I Am Groot! Plants Are More “Alive” Than We Think

by Bill Sullivan in The 'Scope

Inspired by Groot from the hit movie, "Guardians of the Galaxy", I found that plants are more like us than we realize...... Read more »

  • November 6, 2014
  • 07:13 AM
  • 98 views

Countries with more gender equality score more Olympic medals - among women and men

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

There are huge benefits to be gained when women and men are given equal opportunities. For example, companies with at least one woman on their board are more successful. In countries with less stereotyped views about women's abilities, girls tend to perform better at science. Now a team led by Jennifer Berdahl has extended this line of research to the realm of sport. In countries with greater gender equality, they find, both women and men tend to perform better at the Olympics.The researchers lo........ Read more »

  • November 6, 2014
  • 04:30 AM
  • 84 views

Neurotensin, autism and tail-chasing Bull Terrriers?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

I'm not kidding.The paper by Tsilioni and colleagues [1] (open-access) did indeed look at serum levels of neurotensin and corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) in a cohort of children diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) alongside levels in tail-chasing Bull Terrier dogs as compared to unaffected [non tail-chasing] Bull Terriers (BTs) and Labrador Retriever dogs. You may well smirk or even laugh at such research but, as per the recent [preliminary] broccoli chemical - autis........ Read more »

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