Post List

  • January 13, 2015
  • 04:58 AM
  • 99 views

Autism diagnosis as a predictor of slow colonic transit

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Slow colonic transit is all about issues with the speed of gastrointestinal (GI) motility and how as well as deriving nourishment from our food/drink, the other important task which our gut undertakes is the removal of waste, which it generally does pretty well. The paper by Zainab Ridha and colleagues [1] suggested that a diagnosis of autism might be over-represented when it came to their review of children referred for "nuclear transit studies", that is measuring bowel transit by mea........ Read more »

Ridha Z, Quinn R, & Croaker GD. (2014) Predictors of slow colonic transit in children. Pediatric surgery international. PMID: 25549892  

  • January 13, 2015
  • 02:46 AM
  • 111 views

How do viruses work in making us smart?

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

Main Point:

Viruses are important in making us smarter by improving the basic functions of the brain, especially the regulation of gene expressions.

Published in:

Cell Reports

Study Further:

Researchers from Lund University in Sweden have found that millions of year’s old inherited viruses can have special impact on the development of complex networks in the brain of human beings.

Previously, it was clear that endogenous retroviruses make nearly 5% of DNA of human beings,........ Read more »

Fasching, L., Kapopoulou, A., Sachdeva, R., Petri, R., Jönsson, M., Männe, C., Turelli, P., Jern, P., Cammas, F., Trono, D.... (2015) TRIM28 Represses Transcription of Endogenous Retroviruses in Neural Progenitor Cells. Cell Reports, 10(1), 20-28. DOI: 10.1016/j.celrep.2014.12.004  

  • January 12, 2015
  • 10:30 PM
  • 106 views

Cataloging a year of blogging: the philosophical turn

by Artem Kaznatcheev in Evolutionary Games Group

Passion and motivation are strange and confusing facets of being. Many things about them feel paradoxical. For example, I really enjoy writing, categorizing, and — obviously, if you’ve read many of the introductory paragraphs on TheEGG — blabbing on far too long about myself. So you’d expect that I would have been extremely motivated to […]... Read more »

Kaznatcheev, A., Montrey, M., & Shultz, T.R. (2014) Evolving useful delusions: Subjectively rational selfishness leads to objectively irrational cooperation. Proceedings of the 36th annual conference of the Cognitive Science Society. arXiv: 1405.0041v1

  • January 12, 2015
  • 08:26 PM
  • 96 views

Volcanic eruptions partially explain global warming hiatus

by Jonathan Trinastic in Goodnight Earth

The well-known global warming hiatus since 2000 has been partially explained by recent data from satellite measurements showing that sulfate emissions from volcanic eruptions is reflecting incoming sunlight.... Read more »

Santer, B., Solomon, S., Bonfils, C., Zelinka, M., Painter, J., Beltran, F., Fyfe, J., Johannesson, G., Mears, C., Ridley, D.... (2014) Observed multi-variable signals of late 20th and early 21st century volcanic activity. Geophysical Research Letters. DOI: 10.1002/2014GL062366  

  • January 12, 2015
  • 05:08 PM
  • 105 views

Study shows rise in mass die-offs

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

You really don’t hear much about mass die-offs from mainstream news outlets; this might make you think they don’t happen that often. However, an analysis of 727 mass die-offs of nearly 2,500 animal species from the past 70 years has found that such events are increasing among birds, fish, and marine invertebrates. At the same time, the number of individuals killed appears to be decreasing for reptiles and amphibians, and is unchanged for mammals.... Read more »

Samuel B. Fey, Adam M. Siepielski, Sébastien Nusslé, Kristina Cervantes-Yoshida, Jason L. Hwan, Eric R. Huber, Maxfield J. Fey, Alessandro Catenazzi, & Stephanie M. Carlson. (2015) Recent shifts in the occurrence, cause, and magnitude of animal mass mortality events. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. info:/10.1073/pnas.1414894112

  • January 12, 2015
  • 10:56 AM
  • 102 views

Dietary Grains and Heart/Stroke Mortality

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

Dietary intake of whole grains and fiber shows consistent beneficial effects on a variety of health and mortality measures.In a post in 2011, I reviewed study results from the NIH-AARP cohort. That study reported reduced cardiovascular disease but not cancer in men and women with the highest fiber intake.A recent Harvard University study examined mortality risk in a group of U.S. health professionals grouped by level of whole grain intake.Participants in this study were over 118,000 men and wome........ Read more »

  • January 12, 2015
  • 10:24 AM
  • 108 views

Collective Personality and Our Environment

by Miss Behavior in The Scorpion and the Frog

We are all familiar with the concept of the personality of an individual. We are less familiar with group- or collective personalities (although most teachers can tell you at length about the personalities of each of their classes). The concept is the same: whereas an individual personality relates to an individual’s consistent behaviors across time and contexts, a collective personality relates to a group’s consistent behaviors across time and contexts. Collective personalities can be stron........ Read more »

  • January 12, 2015
  • 09:44 AM
  • 71 views

Psychologists and psychiatrists feel less empathy for patients when their problems are explained biologically

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

The idea that mental illness is related to brain abnormalities or other biological factors is popular among some patients; they say it demystifies their experiences and lends legitimacy to their symptoms. However, studies show that biological explanations can increase mental health stigma, encouraging the public perception that people with mental illness are essentially different, and that their problems are permanent. Now Matthew Lebowitz and Woo-young Ahn have published new evidence that sugge........ Read more »

  • January 12, 2015
  • 09:00 AM
  • 41 views

Let that bad mood go, for the good of your health

by Katharine Blackwell in Contemplating Cognition

An apple a day may keep the doctor away, but will a bad mood a day bring the doctor running? Perhaps, but it may depend on what your culture thinks about bad moods.... Read more »

Curhan KB, Sims T, Markus HR, Kitayama S, Karasawa M, Kawakami N, Love GD, Coe CL, Miyamoto Y, & Ryff CD. (2014) Just how bad negative affect is for your health depends on culture. Psychological science, 25(12), 2277-80. PMID: 25304884  

  • January 12, 2015
  • 08:00 AM
  • 106 views

More sex, more UTIs: how timing affects your risk of bladder infection

by Betty Zou in Eat, Read, Science

“Pee after sex” is perhaps one of the most memorable pieces of advice I’ve picked up in conversations with female friends over the years. The theory is that peeing right after sex will help to flush out any bacteria that may have entered your body during sex and prevent them from infecting your urinary tract.... Read more »

  • January 12, 2015
  • 05:14 AM
  • 139 views

Why do some people see ghosts?

by Isabel Torres in Science in the clouds

For most people ghosts and spirits are part of the imaginary, but a few are truly convinced they can sometimes feel a strange presence near them. These individuals are not experiencing a paranormal phenomenon—they’re having an illusion. Schizophrenics, for instance, consistently report hearing voices or feeling someone—a ‘shadow’ or a ‘man’—close to them. Scientists have long known that illusions have a neurological cause, but they haven’t managed to pinpoint exactly ........ Read more »

Blanke Olaf, Masayuki Hara, Lukas Heydrich, Andrea Serino, Akio Yamamoto, Toshiro Higuchi, Roy Salomon, Margitta Seeck, Theodor Landis, & Shahar Arzy. (2014) Neurological and Robot-Controlled Induction of an Apparition. Current Biology, 24(22), 2681-2686. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2014.09.049  

  • January 12, 2015
  • 04:35 AM
  • 120 views

Ritual circumcision and risk of autism

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

A quote to begin: "We confirmed our hypothesis that boys who undergo ritual circumcision may run a greater risk of developing ASD [autism spectrum disorder].""Objetos dispersos" de Xulio Formoso 2008That was the rather surprising finding reported by Morten Frisch & Jacob Simonsen [1] (open-access) following their register-based cohort study based in Denmark. Some of the media following this paper can be seen here.I'll be honest with you and say that my brow furrowed somewhat upon f........ Read more »

  • January 12, 2015
  • 03:21 AM
  • 100 views

Citations of Excellence Awards 2014

by Andreas Wieland in Supply Chain Management Research

Like every year (see my previous post), Emerald rewards authors of exceptional papers covered in its extensive Emerald Management Reviews database with a Citation of Excellence Award (full list). I went through the latest list of the Citations of Excellence Top 50 papers. This time, the list contains at least two papers from related disciplines […]... Read more »

Locke, R., Qin, F., & Brause, A. (2007) Does Monitoring Improve Labor Standards? Lessons from Nike. Industrial and Labor Relations Review, 61(1), 3-31. info:/

  • January 11, 2015
  • 08:02 PM
  • 113 views

Police Brutality And The Efficacy Of Body-Worn Cameras

by Alexis Delanoir in How to Paint Your Panda

In a study entitled "The Effect of Police Body-Worn Cameras on Use of Force and Citizen's Complaints Against the Police: A Randomized Controlled Trial," published in the Journal of Quantitative Criminology, Ariel et al. review what is the first scientific report on the topic of whether or not police body-worn cameras work in terms of decreasing the rate of excessive force by police. As the title suggests, it also reviewed the effects of body-worn cameras on the rate of complaints ........ Read more »

  • January 11, 2015
  • 05:56 PM
  • 78 views

Epistasis in living colour—mapping an evolutionary trajectory

by Humeandroid in The Art of World-Making

Reconstruction of evolutionary trajectories will be a favourite topic on this blog, since it’s a very interesting area that is currently growing rapidly. I already wrote about nice new work showing how heat stability can evolve in thermophiles (heat-loving organisms). Now there’s a new paper looking at how blue color vision arose in the lineage […]... Read more »

Yokoyama, S., Xing, J., Liu, Y., Faggionato, D., Altun, A., & Starmer, W. (2014) Epistatic Adaptive Evolution of Human Color Vision. PLoS Genetics, 10(12). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pgen.1004884  

  • January 11, 2015
  • 03:10 PM
  • 130 views

Being angry might be good for your health

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

In the US and many Western countries, people are urged to manage feelings of anger or suffer its ill effects. We are raised to, for a large part, stifle our emotions and to “not be so angry.” However, new research with participants from the US and Japan suggests that anger may actually be linked with better, not worse, health at least in certain cultures.... Read more »

Kitayama S., J. M. Boylan, Y. Miyamoto, C. S. Levine, H. R. Markus, M. Karasawa, C. L. Coe, N. Kawakami, G. D. Love, & C. D. Ryff. (2015) Expression of Anger and Ill Health in Two Cultures: An Examination of Inflammation and Cardiovascular Risk. Psychological Science. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0956797614561268  

  • January 11, 2015
  • 01:06 PM
  • 120 views

The Tragic History of Surgery for Schizophrenia

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

A compelling article in the Journal of Medical Biography recounts the story of Bayard Holmes and Henry Cotton, two American "surgeon-psychiatrists" who believed that they could cure schizophrenia by removing parts of their patients' intestines (and other organs). Both men tested their theories on their own children - with tragic results. The article is by Jonathan Davidson of Duke University.





Holmes and Cotton had a theory to justify these extreme treatments: autointoxication - the id... Read more »

  • January 11, 2015
  • 01:00 PM
  • 88 views

A decade's worth of data on alcohol and circadian rhythms

by Allison in Dormivigilia

Across the past decade, the lab where I completed my PhD work and our collaborator have undertaken numerous experiments reflected in over 10 original research publications on how alcohol affects circadian timekeeping. The journey continues. ... Read more »

  • January 11, 2015
  • 11:00 AM
  • 89 views

The viruses inside us: can endogenous retroviruses elicit antibodies?

by EE Giorgi in CHIMERAS

January Moonrise © EEGToday I would like to discuss a couple of papers that I used as premise for my new thriller Immunity, which will be part of the Apocalypse Weird series, created by Nick Cole, Michael Bunker and Tim Grahl. Just like all my other thrillers, Immunity too, finds its roots in some fascinating facts about genetics, virology and of course immunity.The premise of the book has to do with something I discussed a long time ago, in one of my very first posts: human endogenous ret........ Read more »

Dickerson F, Lillehoj E, Stallings C, Wiley M, Origoni A, Vaughan C, Khushalani S, Sabunciyan S, & Yolken R. (2012) Antibodies to retroviruses in recent onset psychosis and multi-episode schizophrenia. Schizophrenia research, 138(2-3), 198-205. PMID: 22542615  

  • January 10, 2015
  • 03:54 PM
  • 142 views

Experiment showcasing humanity’s ‘dark side’ may offer a way to control it

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

It was an infamous experiment, one on obedience and reprehensible behavior done in 1961. With memories of Holocaust atrocities and the prosecution of Nazi officials at Nuremberg still fresh, psychologist Stanley Milgram made history. You may not remember the name per say, but chances are you know his work.... Read more »

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