Post List

  • December 30, 2016
  • 05:00 AM
  • 241 views

Friday Fellow: Peacock Spikemoss

by Piter Boll in Earthling Nature

by Piter Kehoma Boll This is the last Friday Fellow of the year and I decided to choose a beautiful and little known plant, the peacock spikemoss, more commonly known as Willdenow’s spikemoss or peacock fern, and scientifically known as Selaginella … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • December 29, 2016
  • 08:20 PM
  • 297 views

Believe in miracles... and yourself

by Aurametrix team in Aurametrix Blog

End of the year is a very special time as Holiday lights melt away our inner Grinch and we start to believe in miracles and new beginnings. ​Belief is not a religious phenomenon. It is our way of coping with the future and finding existential meaning. Scientific studies show that belief in miracles contributes to greater life satisfaction. Belief in science and technological progress can make people satisfied with their lives even more. The stronger the sense of personal control, the higher s........ Read more »

  • December 29, 2016
  • 05:57 AM
  • 322 views

The Myth of "Darwin's Body-Snatchers"

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

Did Charles Darwin's thirst for skulls contribute to the near-extinction of the Aboriginal Tasmanian people?





If you believe certain creationists, Darwin sought examples of Tasmanian skulls in order to prove that this unfortunate race was a 'missing link' between humans and apes. However, according to John van Wyhe in a new paper called Darwin's body-snatchers?, this story has zero basis in fact.
As a Darwin scholar, I thought I had heard all the myths concerning Charles Darwin but on... Read more »

van Wyhe J. (2016) Darwin's body-snatchers?. Endeavour. PMID: 28012688  

  • December 28, 2016
  • 05:00 AM
  • 256 views

Sometimes academics do overthink things

by Craig Payne in Running Research Junkie

Sometimes academics do overthink things. I call it limping... Read more »

  • December 28, 2016
  • 04:30 AM
  • 275 views

Ocular Injuries May Not Be the Most Common, But Are They Easily Preventable?

by Kyle Harris in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Sport-related ocular injuries are most commonly open wounds to the eye or surrounding visual structures. Advocating for, or implementing rule changes to require protective eyewear could greatly mitigate this risk.... Read more »

Haring RS, Sheffield ID, Canner JK, & Schneider EB. (2016) Epidemiology of Sports-Related Eye Injuries in the United States. JAMA ophthalmology, 134(12), 1382-1390. PMID: 27812702  

  • December 27, 2016
  • 02:04 PM
  • 421 views

Why we have not met Aliens yet?

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

A huge of number of people keeps on thinking about the existence of some other intelligent beings in the universe but still we have not met any aliens. Why?

Earth is rare

Earth is special planet

One of the reasons that we have not met aliens is that Earth is rare and there is nothing just like Earth in the universe. In this regard, Paleontologist Peter Ward and astronomer Donald Brownlee presented the Rare Earth Hypothesis about 17 years ago.

According to the Rare Earth Hypothesis, t........ Read more »

Heller, R., & Armstrong, J. (2014) Superhabitable Worlds. Astrobiology, 14(1), 50-66. DOI: 10.1089/ast.2013.1088  

  • December 27, 2016
  • 06:10 AM
  • 318 views

2016 autism research review on Questioning Answers

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Time flies! Once again, I'm posting my annual 'state of the science' autism research review, this time covering the particularly unusual year of 2016.With around 300 blog entries to choose from, I'm changing the format this year to list a 'top 5' of areas where I think some scientific progress has been made. The caveat as ever being that there are still mountains to climb in terms of delineating aetiology, nature and importantly, how one can actually improve quality of life for those on the........ Read more »

Waterhouse, L., London, E., & Gillberg, C. (2016) ASD Validity. Review Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 3(4), 302-329. DOI: 10.1007/s40489-016-0085-x  

  • December 23, 2016
  • 11:17 PM
  • 341 views

The Lyme disease spirochete lives without thiamine

by Microbe Fan in Spirochetes Unwound

Thiamine, or vitamin B1, is vital for the survival of all living things.  One of the biologically functional forms of thiamine, thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP), is essential for the catalytic activity of several critical metabolic enzymes.  For this reason, we must get thiamine from the food that we eat (or the vitamin pills that we swallow).  Microbes obtain the vitamin from their surroundings, but they can also make their own thiamine if it's not available.It turns out that the Lym........ Read more »

Zhang K, Bian J, Deng Y, Smith A, Nunez RE, Li MB, Pal U, Yu AM, Qiu W, Ealick SE.... (2016) Lyme disease spirochaete Borrelia burgdorferi does not require thiamin. Nature Microbiology, 16213. PMID: 27869793  

Xu H, Caimano MJ, Lin T, He M, Radolf JD, Norris SJ, Gherardini F, Wolfe AJ, & Yang XF. (2010) Role of acetyl-phosphate in activation of the Rrp2-RpoN-RpoS pathway in Borrelia burgdorferi. PLoS pathogens, 6(9). PMID: 20862323  

Subba Raju BV, Esteve-Gassent MD, Karna SL, Miller CL, Van Laar TA, & Seshu J. (2011) Oligopeptide permease A5 modulates vertebrate host-specific adaptation of Borrelia burgdorferi. Infection and immunity, 79(8), 3407-20. PMID: 21628523  

  • December 23, 2016
  • 01:47 PM
  • 333 views

What Scientists Think About Scientists

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

Most people believe that scientists have high levels of objectivity and integrity - and scientists themselves share these positive views of their own profession. But according to scientists, not all researchers are equally upstanding, with male and early-career scientists being seen as somewhat less trustworthy than others.



That's according to a new paper from Dutch researchers Coosje Veldkamp et al.: Who Believes in the Storybook Image of the Scientist?

Based on a series of studies in... Read more »

Veldkamp CL, Hartgerink CH, van Assen MA, & Wicherts JM. (2016) Who Believes in the Storybook Image of the Scientist?. Accountability in research. PMID: 28001440  

  • December 23, 2016
  • 06:43 AM
  • 316 views

Establishment of a new BHD Syndrome cell line

by Joana Guedes in BHD Research Blog

Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome is caused by mutations in the FLCN gene. The FLCN protein acts as a tumour suppressor and BHD patients have a high risk of developing renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The mechanisms of tumour formation in BHD have been investigated using mouse models and human RCC tissues. However, in vitro signalling studies of human renal cells with mutant FLCN are still scarce. In a recent study, Furuya et al. (2016) established a new cell line from a BHD patient’s chromophobe ........ Read more »

  • December 23, 2016
  • 05:13 AM
  • 320 views

Bad news for DARPA's RAM program: Electrical Stimulation of Entorhinal Region Impairs Memory

by The Neurocritic in The Neurocritic





The neural machinery that forms new memories is fragile and vulnerable to insults arising from brain injuries, cerebral anoxia, and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's. Unlike language, which shows a great deal of plasticity after strokes and other injuries, episodic memory – memory for autobiographical events and contextual details of past experiences – doesn't recover after

... Read more »

  • December 23, 2016
  • 05:03 AM
  • 355 views

ADHD symptoms and chronic fatigue syndrome?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

With the pinnacle of the season of 'jolly' almost upon us, I'd like to make some brief discussion on the findings reported by Denise Rogers and colleagues [1] and specifically the observation that: "ADHD [attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder] symptoms were significantly greater in the CFS [chronic fatigue syndrome] group than in HC [healthy controls]."With the aim of examining both the prevalence of fatigue in cases of ADHD and the prevalence of ADHD symptoms in adults wi........ Read more »

  • December 23, 2016
  • 05:00 AM
  • 225 views

Friday Fellow: Christmas Wreath Lichen

by Piter Boll in Earthling Nature

by Piter Kehoma Boll Celebrating Christmas (or whatever you call this time of the year), today’s Friday Fellow is another lichen. And the reason I chose it is because it is known as Christmas wreath lichen due to its red … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • December 23, 2016
  • 04:53 AM
  • 296 views

Believing

by Multiple Authors in EPPI-Centre blog

[Warning: do not read this with small kids around!] Mark Newman poses some questions in theme with the seasonal festivities: what does it mean to believe in Father Christmas? Does it really differ that much from belief in the role of evidence? We at the EPPI-Centre are happy to rise to the occasion and wish all of our readers a very Merry Christmas and a happy and prosperous New Year.

 
... Read more »

  • December 23, 2016
  • 04:30 AM
  • 298 views

Do Low Neurocognitive Scores Increase the Risk of Injury?

by Stephan Bodkin in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

An athlete with low baseline neurocognitive scores is likely to produce knee movement patterns that are associated to anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury.... Read more »

  • December 22, 2016
  • 04:30 AM
  • 314 views

More Is Better: Exercise Therapy for the Ankle

by Kyle Kosik in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Exercise therapy and external supports reduce the chance of an ankle sprain; increasing the volume of exercise further reduces the odds.... Read more »

  • December 22, 2016
  • 03:31 AM
  • 352 views

Psychosis (sometimes) as an immune disorder?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"Some psychosis cases an 'immune disorder'" went the BBC headline with reference to the paper by Belinda Lennox and colleagues [1] talking about the detection of antibodies against the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) in cases of first-episode psychosis (FEP).Although by no means a universal phenomenon, researchers reported that 3% of their 228 participants diagnosed with FEP who provided a blood sample showed the presence of NMDAR antibodies compared with none of the healthy controls ........ Read more »

  • December 21, 2016
  • 06:02 AM
  • 383 views

"New form of autism found"

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"New form of autism found" went one of the headlines reporting on the paper by Dora C. Tărlungeanu and colleagues [1] and findings that "elucidate a neurological syndrome defined by SLC7A5 mutations and support an essential role for the BCAA [branched-chain amino acids] in human brain function." This work continues a rather important research story talking about how one 'type' of autism might have some important roots in relation to the branched-chain amino acids and their m........ Read more »

Tărlungeanu, D., Deliu, E., Dotter, C., Kara, M., Janiesch, P., Scalise, M., Galluccio, M., Tesulov, M., Morelli, E., Sonmez, F.... (2016) Impaired Amino Acid Transport at the Blood Brain Barrier Is a Cause of Autism Spectrum Disorder. Cell, 167(6), 1481-2147483647. DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2016.11.013  

  • December 21, 2016
  • 04:30 AM
  • 306 views

Colder May Not Be Cool for Recovery

by Nicole Cattano in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

After exercise, cold water immersion at 15°C may offer some improvements in recovery based on performance of a jump task and possibly markers of muscle damage. A colder temperature may not be as effective as cool water, so controlling the treatment parameters based on evidence is important.... Read more »

Vieira, A., Siqueira, A., Ferreira-Junior, J., do Carmo, J., Durigan, J., Blazevich, A., & Bottaro, M. (2016) The Effect of Water Temperature during Cold-Water Immersion on Recovery from Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage. International Journal of Sports Medicine, 37(12), 937-943. DOI: 10.1055/s-0042-111438  

  • December 20, 2016
  • 11:15 AM
  • 402 views

10 scientifically proven ways to influence or know the people silently

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

Want to know if someone is interested? Watch their pupils

The pupils are among those parts of body languages that are not in our conscious control. White and Maltzman (1977) found that the pupil starts dilating when a person shows interest in some other person he or she talking to.

Via: Psyblog

Feet

Want to know the person is into you? Watch the feet

Most people know how to keep a check on their expressions, but they are unaware about their feet. So, if a person is interested in........ Read more »

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