Post List

  • August 1, 2014
  • 06:26 AM
  • 152 views

Investing in cancer research pays off

by Lizzie Perdeaux in BHD Research Blog

In the UK, a significant amount of medical research funding – an estimated £2.9 billion in 2012/13 – comes from the public purse through taxes and charitable donations, or from the Wellcome Trust, so it is important to see whether … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • August 1, 2014
  • 05:25 AM
  • 137 views

Psychologists investigate a major, ignored reason for our lack of sleep - bedtime procrastination

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

Short term, lack of sleep scrambles our mental functioning. Long term, the health consequences can be dire. What's stopping us from getting enough?For many, adequate sleep is elusive because of sleep disorders, including varieties of insomnia. For others there are practical challenges - baby care or night shifts, for example. A new study focuses on another major, yet strangely overlooked, reason - bedtime procrastination. You want to go to bed early. You know you need to get to bed. And yet you ........ Read more »

  • August 1, 2014
  • 03:46 AM
  • 119 views

Restricted and repetitive behaviours disappeared? More optimal outcome and autism

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Today I'm bringing to your attention the paper by Eva Troyb and colleagues [1] and the quite dramatic assertion: "Reports of current behavior indicated that RRB's [restricted and repetitive behaviors] had almost totally disappeared in the OO [optimal outcomes] group". RRBs just in case you might not know include quite an array of behaviours, some of which might not be considered 'disabling' such as the presence of certain circumscribed interests. Others, such as an insistence........ Read more »

  • August 1, 2014
  • 03:11 AM
  • 116 views

Floating Fried Eggs

by beredim in Strange Animals

Fried Egg JellyfishCotylorhiza tuberculataThe common name says it all. This weird-looking jellyfish literally looks like a fried egg! Scientifically known as Cotylorhiza tuberculata, it is one of the two jellyfish species that resemble a fried egg. The other one is Phacellophora camtschatica. Not surprisingly, it also goes by the same name.They may look tasty, but you probably don't want to have one for breakfast! However, you can have a lot of fun with C. tuberculata. This jellyfish has a ........ Read more »

  • August 1, 2014
  • 01:18 AM
  • 111 views

The Evidence from Skull Measurements

by teofilo in Gambler's House

So far in this series of posts on “tracing the connections” between ancient Pueblo sites like Chaco Canyon and modern Pueblos, I’ve discussed evidence from linguistics and folklore, but of course if the issue is determining which modern groups are physically descended from which ancient ones it’s hard to beat evidence from actual physical remains. […]... Read more »

Schillaci, M., & Stojanowski, C. (2002) A Reassessment of Matrilocality in Chacoan Culture. American Antiquity, 67(2), 343. DOI: 10.2307/2694571  

  • July 31, 2014
  • 11:35 PM
  • 176 views

Fall With Dementia and No Change from Baseline Mental Status

by Rogue Medic in Rogue Medic

This happens many times every day. A patient falls and may have hit her head, but there is no change from her normal mental status. To complicate matter, she takes an anticoagulant.

There are no clear signs of serious trauma. so should we automatically go to the trauma center?

What can help us decide?... Read more »

  • July 31, 2014
  • 07:18 PM
  • 268 views

Serious Restrictive Eating Disorders Occur at Any Weight

by Tetyana in Science of Eating Disorders


Although the words “anorexia nervosa” typically conjure up images of emaciated bodies, eating disorders characterized by dietary restriction or weight loss can — and do — occur at any weight. However, precisely because anorexia nervosa is associated with underweight, doctors are less likely to identify eating disorders among individuals who are in the so-called “normal” or above normal weight range, even if they have........ Read more »

  • July 31, 2014
  • 07:10 PM
  • 170 views

Twitter Psychosis as a Cultural Artifact

by The Neurocritic in The Neurocritic

The creation of the category “Twitter Psychosis" tells us more about the culture of contemporary psychiatry than it does about the purported dangers of social media overuse. Can Twitter really “cause” psychotic symptoms in predisposed individuals? Or is Twitter merely the latest technical innovation that influences “the form, origin and content of delusional beliefs” (Bell et al., 2005)? Twitter as the new telephone tower, radio waves, microchip implant or personal TV show, if you wil........ Read more »

Kalbitzer J, Mell T, Bermpohl F, Rapp MA, & Heinz A. (2014) Twitter Psychosis: A Rare Variation or a Distinct Syndrome?. The Journal of nervous and mental disease, 202(8), 623. PMID: 25075647  

  • July 31, 2014
  • 05:26 PM
  • 105 views

Functional Neuroimaging’s Neymar Problem

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

As a “World Cup tie in post” this one’s a bit late, but here’s a story that’s been getting a lot of attention: According to scientists, Neymar uses instinct and not his brain when playing football Yes, if you believe the headlines, research has shown that legendary Brazilian forward Neymar da Silva Santos is so […]The post Functional Neuroimaging’s Neymar Problem appeared first on Neuroskeptic.... Read more »

Eiichi Naito, & Satoshi Hirose. (2014) Efficient foot motor control by Neymar’s brain. Front. Hum. Neurosci. info:/

  • July 31, 2014
  • 01:33 PM
  • 120 views

Mitochondria and Anti Aging

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

I’m sure you can all relate, you go to fix the sink and in the process you build a new kitchen on accident. Anyone… no? Well that is sort of […]... Read more »

  • July 31, 2014
  • 09:22 AM
  • 90 views

What’s the Answer? (electronic lab notebooks)

by Mary in OpenHelix

Biostars is a site for asking, answering and discussing bioinformatics questions and issues. We are members of the community and find it very useful. Often questions and answers arise at Biostars that are germane to our readers (end users of genomics resources). Every Thursday we will be highlighting one of those items or discussions here […]... Read more »

Voegele C., N. Robinot, J. McKay, P. Damiecki, & L. Alteyrac. (2013) A universal open-source Electronic Laboratory Notebook. Bioinformatics, 29(13), 1710-1712. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/bioinformatics/btt253  

  • July 31, 2014
  • 08:39 AM
  • 97 views

3-D Nanostructure Could Efficiently Store Gas

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

Scientists at at Rice University predict functional advantages of a three-dimensional porous nanostructure that could benefit gas storage, nanoelectronics, and composite materials that perform multiple functions.... Read more »

  • July 31, 2014
  • 08:10 AM
  • 110 views

Tough Talking Apes

by Mark E. Lasbury in The 'Scope

The new Planet of the Apes movie has talking apes! In the old Charleton Heston versions, the apes had thousands of years to evolve speech capabilities, but Dawn of the Planet of the Apes takes place only 10 years after their escape from the lab. Anatomical differences between human and ape hyoid position, rib musculature and tongue show us why speech is not possible for Cesar and his friends. In addition, new research points out the importance of the foxp2 protein for speech and auditory functio........ Read more »

  • July 31, 2014
  • 08:01 AM
  • 83 views

July 31, 2014

by Erin Campbell in HighMag Blog

Do you ever feel nostalgic for a specific paper? Maybe this paper inspired your own research, or maybe it was a paper you immediately knew would be game-changing. Maybe, like today’s TBT paper, it was a great paper about solidly executed research with a memorable giggle-inducing technique. Thanks to a nostalgic HighMag reader and friend, Omar Quintero, we are being re-introduced to gonad sandwiches. In mammals, sex determination refers to the changes during early development that lead ........ Read more »

Martineau, J., Nordqvist, K., Tilmann, C., Lovell-Badge, R., & Capel, B. (1997) Male-specific cell migration into the developing gonad. Current Biology, 7(12), 958-968. DOI: 10.1016/S0960-9822(06)00415-5  

  • July 31, 2014
  • 05:31 AM
  • 111 views

The voices heard by people with schizophrenia are friendlier in India and Africa, than in the US

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

When a patient with schizophrenia hears voices in their head, is the experience shaped by the culture they live in? Tanya Luhrmann and her colleagues investigated by interviewing twenty people diagnosed with schizophrenia living in San Mateo, California; twenty in Accra, Ghana; and twenty others in Chennai India. There were similarities across cultures, including descriptions of good and bad voices, but also striking differences.In San Mateo the interviewees talked about their condition as a bra........ Read more »

  • July 31, 2014
  • 04:18 AM
  • 99 views

Dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP) IV and autism: supporting opioid-excess?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Serum levels of dipeptidyl peptidase (DPP) IV were found to be lower in children with autism compared to asymptomatic controls according to the study by Shahid Bashira & Laila AL-Ayadhi [1]. Based on analysis by ELISA, researchers concluded that "alterations in the plasma level of DPP IV play a role in the pathophysiology of autism".A sailor went to sea, sea, sea... @ Wikipedia Anyone who has followed the autism research scene for any length of time might have already heard ab........ Read more »

  • July 31, 2014
  • 02:25 AM
  • 48 views

Sugar mimics guide embryonic stem cells toward neural fate

by beredim in Stem Cells Freak

Kamil GodulaCreditEmbryonic stem cells can develop into virtually all kinds of cells. However, researchers still don't understand how to guide their development into the specific types of mature cells that make up the organs and other structures of living organisms. Now, researchers say that one key to guiding the differentiation process are long chains of sugars that dangle from proteins on surfaces of cells. Kamil Godula's group at the University of California, San Diego, has created ........ Read more »

  • July 30, 2014
  • 08:23 PM
  • 100 views

How the presence of a bilingual school changes the linguistic profile of a community

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

It is one of the great narratives of our time that the market will fix everything. In education this means that parental choice is assumed to improve education. Rather than the state supplying high-quality education, the neoliberal credo is that … Continue reading →... Read more »

Clyne, Michael. (2005) Australia's Language Potential . Sydney, UNSW Press. . info:/

  • July 30, 2014
  • 06:48 PM
  • 93 views

Keeping lithium contained: new design allows for high energy-density anode in Li-ion batteries

by Jonathan Trinastic in Goodnight Earth

Researchers have found a way to limit volume expansion and prevent dendrite formation of all-lithium anodes. This promises to increase the energy density of Li-ion batteries!... Read more »

Zheng, G., Lee, S., Liang, Z., Lee, H., Yan, K., Yao, H., Wang, H., Li, W., Chu, S., & Cui, Y. (2014) Interconnected hollow carbon nanospheres for stable lithium metal anodes. Nature Nanotechnology. DOI: 10.1038/nnano.2014.152  

  • July 30, 2014
  • 04:00 PM
  • 107 views

SCIENCE IN THE NEWS: THE 2014 EBOLA OUTBREAK

by Emily Lawson in Antisense Science

If you’ve been watching the news recently, you’ll probably have seen reports on the Ebola outbreak in West Africa. Around 673 people in Guinea and Liberia have died so far (including one case of a Liberian government employee who died shortly after arriving at Lagos airport in Nigeria), making this the most deadly outbreak to date. So what exactly is Ebola, and why is it so deadly?

Ebola virus disease (EVD) has an incredibly high mortality rate – while the current outbreak h........ Read more »

Dixon MG, Schafer IJ, & EIS officer, CDC. (2014) Ebola viral disease outbreak - west Africa, 2014. MMWR. Morbidity and mortality weekly report, 63(25), 548-51. PMID: 24964881  

Gatherer, D. (2014) The 2014 Ebola virus disease outbreak in West Africa. Journal of General Virology, 95(Pt_8), 1619-1624. DOI: 10.1099/vir.0.067199-0  

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