Post List

  • November 19, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 50 views

Are They Really up to the Task or is it Just Sandbagging?

by Kyle Harris in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Among athletes with an invalid computerized neurocognitive test at baseline, 87% received valid scores upon reassessment, which suggests reassessment can be used to gain a valid baseline score.... Read more »

Schatz, P., Kelley, T., Ott, S., Solomon, G., Elbin, R., Higgins, K., & Moser, R. (2014) Utility of Repeated Assessment After Invalid Baseline Neurocognitive Test Performance. Journal of Athletic Training, 49(5), 659-664. DOI: 10.4085/1062-6050-49.3.37  

  • November 18, 2014
  • 09:29 PM
  • 57 views

Is There Such a Thing as ‘Facebook Murder’?

by Wiley Asia Blog in Wiley Asia Blog - Social Science

Investigators recently set out to consider whether homicides involving social networking sites were unique and worthy of labels such as ‘Facebook Murder’, and to explore the ways in which perpetrators had used such sites in the homicides they had committed.

The cases they identified were not collectively unique or unusual when compared with general trends and characteristics—certainly not to a degree that would necessitate the introduction of a new category of homicide or a ........ Read more »

  • November 18, 2014
  • 06:08 PM
  • 55 views

HIV-1 and autophagy: Gag, Nef, and Tat

by thelonevirologist in Virology Tidbits

Patients infected with a virus that harbours a deletion of the nef gene either do not progress to full blown AIDS or -if so- with a considerable delay compared to patients infected with “standard” HIV as well as lower virus loads, suggesting that the expression of Nef is necessary for maintaining high viral loads and AIDS pathogenicity. In addition, deletions of nef within the genome of the simian equivalent of HIV, SIV, have similar effects in Rhesus monkeys. In general, Nef is bel........ Read more »

Kyei GB, Dinkins C, Davis AS, Roberts E, Singh SB, Dong C, Wu L, Kominami E, Ueno T, Yamamoto A.... (2009) Autophagy pathway intersects with HIV-1 biosynthesis and regulates viral yields in macrophages. The Journal of cell biology, 186(2), 255-68. PMID: 19635843  

Shoji-Kawata S, Sumpter R, Leveno M, Campbell GR, Zou Z, Kinch L, Wilkins AD, Sun Q, Pallauf K, MacDuff D.... (2013) Identification of a candidate therapeutic autophagy-inducing peptide. Nature, 494(7436), 201-6. PMID: 23364696  

Geist MM, Pan X, Bender S, Bartenschlager R, Nickel W, & Fackler OT. (2014) Heterologous Src homology 4 domains support membrane anchoring and biological activity of HIV-1 Nef. The Journal of biological chemistry, 289(20), 14030-44. PMID: 24706755  

Dinkins, C., Pilli, M., & Kehrl, J. (2014) Roles of autophagy in HIV infection. Immunology and Cell Biology. DOI: 10.1038/icb.2014.88  

Dinkins, C., Arko-Mensah, J., & Deretic, V. (2010) Autophagy and HIV. Seminars in Cell , 21(7), 712-718. DOI: 10.1016/j.semcdb.2010.04.004  

Yang YP, Hu LF, Zheng HF, Mao CJ, Hu WD, Xiong KP, Wang F, & Liu CF. (2013) Application and interpretation of current autophagy inhibitors and activators. Acta pharmacologica Sinica, 34(5), 625-35. PMID: 23524572  

Kang R, Zeh HJ, Lotze MT, & Tang D. (2011) The Beclin 1 network regulates autophagy and apoptosis. Cell death and differentiation, 18(4), 571-80. PMID: 21311563  

Bruno, A., De Simone, F., Iorio, V., De Marco, M., Khalili, K., Sariyer, I., Capunzo, M., Nori, S., & Rosati, A. (2014) HIV-1 Tat protein induces glial cell autophagy through enhancement of BAG3 protein levels. Cell Cycle. DOI: 10.4161/15384101.2014.952959  

Romani B, Engelbrecht S, & Glashoff RH. (2010) Functions of Tat: the versatile protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1. The Journal of general virology, 91(Pt 1), 1-12. PMID: 19812265  

  • November 18, 2014
  • 05:14 PM
  • 71 views

Does brain training really work?

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Ever wonder if you could be the next Einstein if only you could do some brain training? Well as it turns out, while computer based ‘brain training’ can boost memory and thinking skills in older adults, many programs promoted by the $1 billion brain training industry are ineffective.... Read more »

  • November 18, 2014
  • 01:15 PM
  • 54 views

From H. pylori to Spanish colonialism: the scales of cancer.

by Artem Kaznatcheev in Evolutionary Games Group

Yesterday was the first day of the 4th Integrated Mathematical Oncology Workshop here at Moffitt. This year, it is run jointly with the Center for Infection Research in Cancer and is thus focused on the interaction of infection disease and cancer. This is a topic that I have not focused much attention on — except […]... Read more »

Kodaman, N., Pazos, A., Schneider, B.G., Piazuelo, M.B., Mera, R., Sobota, R.S., Sicinschi, L.A., Shaffer, C.L., Romero-Gallo, J., de Sablet, T.... (2014) Human and Helicobacter pylori coevolution shapes the risk of gastric disease. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 111(4), 1455-60. PMID: 24474772  

  • November 18, 2014
  • 12:01 PM
  • 67 views

Social Effectiveness Therapy Beats Social Anxiety, Study Shows

by Simon Moesgaard-Kjeldsen in Reflectd

A new randomized controlled trial shows promising results for the treatment of social anxiety disorder.... Read more »

Beidel, D., Alfano, C., Kofler, M., Rao, P., Scharfstein, L., & Wong Sarver, N. (2014) The impact of social skills training for social anxiety disorder: A randomized controlled trial. Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 28(8), 908-918. DOI: 10.1016/j.janxdis.2014.09.016  

  • November 18, 2014
  • 08:00 AM
  • 53 views

This Is Your TV On Drugs

by Mark E. Lasbury in The 'Scope

There are more than 100 drug commercials on TV every hour of every day. Why? Because they work. Research shows that advertised drugs are prescribed 9x more than comparable drugs that aren’t advertised. And all those side effect notices? The drug companies like them because research says that all you remember is that they were “honest” with you.... Read more »

  • November 18, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 60 views

Feel like I-dosing? [Part 2]

by Henkjan Honing in Music Matters

"Digital drugs," otherwise known as binaural beats, have sparked an outcry in Lebanon, with the Justice Minister Ashraf Rifi calling Thursday for legal measures to be taken against the product...... Read more »

  • November 18, 2014
  • 04:52 AM
  • 36 views

Paediatric congenital heart disease and autism risk?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"Children aged 2-17 with CHD [congenital heart disease] were more likely than those without CHD to have had a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (crude OR, 4.6; 95% CI, 1.9-11.0) or intellectual disability (Crude OR, 9.1; 95% CI, 5.4-15.4)".The traveller @ Wikipedia That was a key conclusion reported in the study by Hilda Razzaghi and colleagues [1] based on their analysis of data from "the 1997-2011 National Health Interview Survey", a US initiative which aims to pro........ Read more »

  • November 18, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 55 views

Psychological Strategies Effectively Reduce Perceived and Physiological Markers of Stress

by Caitlin Dios & Bryan Pope in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Both cognitive and somatic relaxation strategies reduce perceived stress and physiological markers of stress.... Read more »

  • November 17, 2014
  • 03:33 PM
  • 56 views

The (Re)discovery of a major brain pathway

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

It was like something out of a mystery movie, a couple of years ago a scientist, looking at dozens of MRI scans of human brains noticed something surprising. A large, fiber pathway that seemed to be part of the network of connections that process visual information showed up on the scans, but the researcher couldn’t find it mentioned in any of the modern-day anatomy textbooks he had.... Read more »

Brian Wandell, Jason Yeatman, & Kevin Weiner. (2014) The vertical occipital fasciculus: A century of controversy resolved by in vivo measurements. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. info:/10.1073/pnas.1418503111

  • November 17, 2014
  • 11:54 AM
  • 49 views

That’s a Higgs but how many?

by Marco Frasca in The Gauge Connection

CMS and ATLAS collaborations are yet up to work producing results from the datasets obtained in the first phase of activity of LHC. The restart is really near the corner and, maybe already the next summer, things can change considerably. Anyway what they get from the old data can be really promising and rather intriguing. […]... Read more »

Marco Frasca. (2013) Scalar field theory in the strong self-interaction limit. Eur. Phys. J. C (2014) 74:2929. arXiv: 1306.6530v5

Marco Frasca. (2012) Classical solutions of a massless Wess-Zumino model. J.Nonlin.Math.Phys. 20:4, 464-468 (2013). arXiv: 1212.1822v2

  • November 17, 2014
  • 09:15 AM
  • 66 views

Habits and learning

by Janet Kwasniak in Neuro-patch

Habits allow us to perform actions without attending to every detail; we can do complex things and more than one action at a time without overloading our cognitive and motor systems. They are goal-directed macro actions made up of a sequence of simple primitive actions. A habit allows a complex action to be launched as […]... Read more »

Balderas, G. (2014) Habits as learning enhancers. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience. DOI: 10.3389/fnhum.2014.00918  

  • November 17, 2014
  • 07:08 AM
  • 68 views

How guessing the wrong answer helps you learn the right answer

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

Guessing, even wrongly, is thought toactivate webs of knowledge, which leadsto richer encoding of the correct answer. It's well known that taking tests helps us learn. The act of retrieving information from memory helps that information stick. This seems intuitive. More surprising is the recent discovery that guessing aids subsequent learning of the correct answer, even if your initial guess was wrong.Let's consider a simple example in the context of learning capital cities. Imagine you don........ Read more »

  • November 17, 2014
  • 04:41 AM
  • 63 views

Social anxiety in one in four adults with autism

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"Twenty-eight percent (14 of 50) of individuals with ASD [autism spectrum disorder] fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for SAD [social anxiety disorder]"."I am Vulcan, sir. We embrace technicality."So said the findings reported by Susanne Bejerot and colleagues [1] (open-access) as part of their investigations looking at SAD occurrence among adults diagnosed with ASD. Once again the sometimes very disabling issue of anxiety resurfaces with autism in mind. Before going on, I'm minde........ Read more »

Bejerot S, Eriksson JM, & Mörtberg E. (2014) Social anxiety in adult autism spectrum disorder. Psychiatry research. PMID: 25200187  

  • November 17, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 48 views

Tag Us In! What Do Coaches Know About Exertional Heat Stroke and the Role of the Athletic Trainer?

by Yanira Dawson, Crystal Petrus, Savannah Kuester in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

High school football coaches are confident in their ability to handle exertional heat stroke but their knowledge is limited in this area. The coaches value and understand the role of athletic trainers.... Read more »

  • November 16, 2014
  • 08:05 PM
  • 58 views

Canine science catch up: 16-30 September 2014

by Cobb & Hecht in Do You Believe In Dog?

Gosh, it's been a busy ride since posting the excellent guest post by research, Cat Reeve, about her interesting detector dog research.  So now it's time to play catch up, starting with the canine science related things that we noticed in the second half of September, captured with the help of Storify - did you miss any of these?[View the story "Do You Believe in Dog? [16 - 30 September 2014]" on Storify]Further reading (some of the abstracts from Canine Science Forum 2014 now available):We........ Read more »

Westgarth Carri, & Hayley E. Christian. (2014) How can we motivate owners to walk their dogs more?. Journal of Veterinary Behavior: Clinical Applications and Research, 9(6). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jveb.2014.09.023  

Horowitz Alexandra, & Hecht Julie . (2014) Categories and consequences of dog-human play: A citizen science approach. Journal of Veterinary Behavior: Clinical Applications and Research, 9(6). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jveb.2014.09.052  

Browne Clare M., T. Mary Foster, & James S. McEwan. (2014) Dog training: Reinforcement timing and owner body language. Journal of Veterinary Behavior: Clinical Applications and Research, 9(6). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jveb.2014.09.059  

  • November 16, 2014
  • 01:47 PM
  • 67 views

Soldiers and Suicide: A familiar tale

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

As a Marine, there is a special place in my heart for all things military. While most protesters are busy arguing about the people who are dying overseas, there is an even more disheartening statistic — the suicide statistics of service members here at home. Suicide is an ugly word, so it’s no surprise that there is not a large movement fighting for better care and a new study done on soldiers doesn’t help.... Read more »

  • November 16, 2014
  • 02:43 AM
  • 70 views

Bilingual students at the crossroads

by Livia Gerber in Language on the Move

Secondary education as a monolingual fork in the road Let me bust a prevalent urban myth: You do not need to be bi- or multilingual to become a linguist. There, busted. In fact, being bilingual initially brought me to a … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • November 15, 2014
  • 12:09 PM
  • 77 views

Telomeres, Epigenetics, and Aging: the new found complexities in your genes

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Telomere length is associated with aging, this isn’t a new statement, but interestingly enough there is more to this story than just the size of your telomeres. Telomere lengths have now been shown to cause epigenetic changes, this new discovery may help explain the aging of cells and how they initiate and transmit disease.... Read more »

Jerome D. Robin,, Andrew T. Ludlow,, Kimberly Batten,, Frederique Magdinier,, Guido Stadler,, Kathyrin R. Wagner,, Jerry W. Shay,, & Woodring E. Wright. (2014) Telomere position effect: regulation of gene expression with progressive telomere shortening over long distances. Genes . info:/

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