Post List

  • September 27, 2014
  • 03:50 AM
  • 80 views

Yes, people with autism do have headaches

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

I don't mean to be haughty but a sentence included in the paper by Victorio [1] led to the title of today's very quick post. Based on a chart review of patients diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) attending a neurology clinic, the author concluded that "ASD patients, despite being known to have indifference to pain, can experience headaches".Pain is something which has cropped up quite a bit in the autism research arena and has appeared more than once on this blog (see here and see ........ Read more »

  • September 26, 2014
  • 02:15 PM
  • 100 views

“GMO” Foods (Once Again) Proven Safe

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

GMO, I shudder every time I hear someone talk about the “dangers”. It’s one of the new buzzwords that doesn’t actually mean anything, but still manages to scare people. Well a new scientific review reports that the performance and health of food-producing animals consuming genetically engineered feed, first introduced 18 years ago, has been comparable to that of animals consuming non-GE feed. Not that this will stop people from spreading fear, but it’s a start.... Read more »

  • September 26, 2014
  • 10:30 AM
  • 83 views

Walking Really Is Just Falling and Catching Yourself

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish

The flailing of a gymnast who’s missed a step on the balance beam might not be far off from what the rest of us experience every day. Each step we take is really a tiny fall, a mathematical model suggests. The random-looking variation in our footfalls is actually a series of corrections. Our strides are […]The post Walking Really Is Just Falling and Catching Yourself appeared first on Inkfish.... Read more »

  • September 26, 2014
  • 08:14 AM
  • 92 views

Anthropomorphic Neuroscience Driven by Researchers with Large TPJs

by The Neurocritic in The Neurocritic

For immediate release — SEPTEMBER 26, 2014Research from the UCL lab of Professor Geraint Rees has proven that the recent craze for suggesting that rats have “regrets” or show “disappointment” is solely due to the size of the left temporal-parietal junction (TPJ) in the human authors of those papers (Cullen et al., 2014). This startling breakthrough was part of a larger effort to associate every known personality trait, political attitude, and individual difference with the size of a un........ Read more »

  • September 26, 2014
  • 08:00 AM
  • 82 views

Breaking Research: Fruit flies provide insights into metabolism and how we age

by Bethany Christmann in Fly on the Wall

Why do we age? It’s more than just a philosophical question; it’s a puzzle that has frustrated scientists for decades. Currently, the most accepted hypothesis is that aging is the result of accumulated damage to our cells during our lifetime. “Accumulated damage” encompasses a variety of things that can go wrong, including DNA mutations, problems […]... Read more »

  • September 26, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 53 views

Would you prefer a smaller government? Actually, no you would not. 

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

For a number of years now, we have been asking our mock jurors what role they think government should play in our society and giving them a number of options among which to choose. Most of them say government should play a smaller role and we certainly have all heard the media messages that tell us […]

Related posts:
“Just about always” and “Never” responses to trusting the federal government
Men prefer boxes and women prefer ellipses?
You might be a conservative if…you p........ Read more »

  • September 26, 2014
  • 05:32 AM
  • 73 views

Schizophrenia after child and adolescent psychiatric disorders

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

More of a 'bring to your attention' post today, as I bring to your attention(!) the paper by Cecilie Frejstrup Maibing and colleagues [1] who concluded: "The risk of being diagnosed with schizophrenia spectrum disorders [SSD] after a child and adolescent psychiatric disorder was significantly increased particularly in the short term but also in the long-term period"."I coulda been a contender"The findings were based on an analysis of one of those very informative Scandinavian........ Read more »

  • September 26, 2014
  • 02:53 AM
  • 67 views

Telomere shortening may cause genetic anticipation in VHL syndrome

by Lizzie Perdeaux in BHD Research Blog

Genetic anticipation describes the situation where younger generations of a family with a genetic disease develop symptoms at a younger age, develop more severe symptoms, or both. A study earlier this year showed that there is evidence of genetic anticipation … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • September 25, 2014
  • 11:34 AM
  • 97 views

September 25, 2014

by Erin Campbell in HighMag Blog

While taking an awesome cell biology course in college, I was coming to terms with my mother’s recent ovarian cancer diagnosis. The scientist in my head couldn’t shake the curiosity about how my mother’s cells could have betrayed her so royally. This intersection of basic cell biology and cancer kick-started my interest in cell biology research. Today’s image is from a paper showing a role for the ARF tumor suppressor in maintaining chromosomal stability. THIS paper is one of the mil........ Read more »

  • September 25, 2014
  • 10:37 AM
  • 105 views

A New Discovery in the Treatment of Autoimmunity and Chronic Inflammation

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Lupus, Type 1 diabetes, and multiple sclerosis are all diseases brought on by autoimmunity — the bodies inability to tell itself apart from foreign invaders. Finding a cure, or even a suitable treatment has been to put it gently a long, painful road, with little to show for it. On the forefront of the war against the body betrayal is immunosuppressants, which with them carry their own set of side effects and in most cases only off mild to moderate relief of symptoms. But that is all changing a........ Read more »

Dubiella C, Cui H, Gersch M, Brouwer AJ, Sieber SA, Krüger A, Liskamp RM, & Groll M. (2014) Selective Inhibition of the Immunoproteasome by Ligand-Induced Crosslinking of the Active Site. Angewandte Chemie (International ed. in English). PMID: 25244435  

  • September 25, 2014
  • 09:46 AM
  • 88 views

What’s the Answer? (domain and lollipop mutation diagrams)

by Mary in OpenHelix

Biostars is a site for asking, answering and discussing bioinformatics questions and issues. We are members of the community and find it very useful. Often questions and answers arise at Biostars that are germane to our readers (end users of genomics resources). Every Thursday we will be highlighting one of those items or discussions here […]... Read more »

Gao J., U. Dogrusoz, G. Dresdner, B. Gross, S. O. Sumer, Y. Sun, A. Jacobsen, R. Sinha, E. Larsson, & E. Cerami. (2013) Integrative Analysis of Complex Cancer Genomics and Clinical Profiles Using the cBioPortal. Science Signaling, 6(269). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/scisignal.2004088  

  • September 25, 2014
  • 05:10 AM
  • 93 views

Temporal trends in US autism prevalence: mainly real increase

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"Diagnosed autism prevalence has risen dramatically in the U.S over the last several decades and continued to trend upward as of birth year 2005. The increase is mainly real and has occurred mostly since the late 1980s"."They call me Cha Cha because I'm the best dancer at St. Bernadette's"That was the conclusion reached in the paper by Cynthia Nevison [1] (open-access) following her analysis of temporal trends in autism diagnosis for birth years between 1970 and 2005. Based on an analysis o........ Read more »

  • September 25, 2014
  • 03:00 AM
  • 22 views

How do male scientists balance the demands of work and family?

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

Academia remains heavily gendered, thanks in part to historical stereotypes that assert men are suited to solving complex problems and ready to put "great works" over other concerns such as community or family. Psychology and sociology have shown how this disadvantages women working in these fields, particularly if they wish to have children.A new study led by Sarah Damaske of Pennsylvania State University takes a different approach, looking at what this world is like for men. From the 73 male s........ Read more »

  • September 24, 2014
  • 07:27 PM
  • 75 views

Coronavirus PLpro, PLP2, and N: taking a STING out of antiviral signalling

by thelonevirologist in Virology Tidbits

The antiviral response following the infection of cells with positive RNA viruses involves the expression of genes encoding Interferon-α and -β (IFN-α /-β), both of which induce the expression of a number of Interferon stimulated genes (ISGs) in a an autocrine and paracrine manner. The activation of the expression of IFN-α and -β itself however depends on a cytoplasmic signaling pathway which involves the recognition of viral ssRNA and dsRNA intermediates by cell........ Read more »

Cornelissen T, Haddad D, Wauters F, Van Humbeeck C, Mandemakers W, Koentjoro B, Sue C, Gevaert K, De Strooper B, Verstreken P.... (2014) The deubiquitinase USP15 antagonizes Parkin-mediated mitochondrial ubiquitination and mitophagy. Human molecular genetics, 23(19), 5227-42. PMID: 24852371  

Oh JE, & Lee HK. (2014) Pattern recognition receptors and autophagy. Frontiers in immunology, 300. PMID: 25009542  

Ablasser A, & Hornung V. (2013) DNA sensing unchained. Cell research, 23(5), 585-7. PMID: 23419517  

van Kasteren PB, Bailey-Elkin BA, James TW, Ninaber DK, Beugeling C, Khajehpour M, Snijder EJ, Mark BL, & Kikkert M. (2013) Deubiquitinase function of arterivirus papain-like protease 2 suppresses the innate immune response in infected host cells. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 110(9). PMID: 23401522  

Saitoh T, Fujita N, Hayashi T, Takahara K, Satoh T, Lee H, Matsunaga K, Kageyama S, Omori H, Noda T.... (2009) Atg9a controls dsDNA-driven dynamic translocation of STING and the innate immune response. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 106(49), 20842-6. PMID: 19926846  

  • September 24, 2014
  • 03:54 PM
  • 79 views

A new Medicine may help Lupus Sufferers

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Lupus, a particularly bad hell on earth for people suffering from it. Lupus is caused by autoimmunity, in where the body attacks itself. I have a special place in my heart for people suffering from the disease because my Uncle suffered from it. There is no cure and only moderately effective treatments for the disorder, which causes, in some cases, the most excruciating pain you will ever feel. Thankfully new findings by a biomedical engineering team raise hope for a new class of drugs to treat l........ Read more »

  • September 24, 2014
  • 12:48 PM
  • 47 views

Towards a synthetic embryo

by Aryeh Warmflash in the Node

Waddington, whose writings on the epigenetic landscape continue to influence developmental biology to this day, called the developing embryo “the most intriguing object that nature has to offer”(Waddington, 1966). The mechanisms of pattern formation and morphogenesis have fascinated biologists for centuries. One question that is difficult to answer is what are the minimal requirements for […]... Read more »

  • September 24, 2014
  • 12:37 PM
  • 99 views

Why Women Give Better Gifts

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

Consumer spending on gifts for birthdays and holidays is a multi-billion dollar big business.Despite this large economic impact, little research examines factors associated with gift recipient satisfaction.Selecting good gifts for others involves a complex social decision-making process related to judging the value hierarchy of others.A study from the Netherlands recently published in the journal PLOS One featured three experiments on gift selection in a series of men and women.The design of the........ Read more »

Pollmann MM, & van Beest I. (2013) Women are better at selecting gifts than men. PloS one, 8(12). PMID: 24386082  

  • September 24, 2014
  • 11:42 AM
  • 77 views

Genetics "Experts" Surveyed on Returning Incidental Findings

by Daniel Koboldt in Massgenomics

In my last post, I wrote about the return of results from next-gen sequencing, specifically a recent paper in AJHG about secondary findings in ~6500 ESP exomes. Today we’ll delve into another paper in the same issue on the attitudes of genetics professionals on return of incidental findings from whole genome sequencing (WGS) and exome sequencing […]... Read more »

  • September 24, 2014
  • 09:46 AM
  • 60 views

Video Tip of the Week: StratomeX for genomic stratification of diseases

by Mary in OpenHelix

The Calyedo team and the tools they develop have been on my short list of favorites for a long time. I’ve been talking about their clever visualizations for years now. My first post on their work was in 2010, with the tip I did on their Calyedo tool that combined gene expression and pathway visualization. […]... Read more »

Streit Marc, Samuel Gratzl, Christian Partl, Dieter Schmalstieg, Hanspeter Pfister, Peter J Park, & Nils Gehlenborg. (2014) Guided visual exploration of genomic stratifications in cancer. Nature Methods, 11(9), 884-885. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nmeth.3088  

  • September 24, 2014
  • 09:10 AM
  • 88 views

6 Things You Need To Know About Your Microbiome

by Bill Sullivan in The 'Scope

Surprising new facts about the bacteria living on and in you.... Read more »

Lax S, Smith DP, Hampton-Marcell J, Owens SM, Handley KM, Scott NM, Gibbons SM, Larsen P, Shogan BD, Weiss S.... (2014) Longitudinal analysis of microbial interaction between humans and the indoor environment. Science (New York, N.Y.), 345(6200), 1048-52. PMID: 25170151  

Bisgaard, H., Li, N., Bonnelykke, K., Chawes, B., Skov, T., Paludan-Müller, G., Stokholm, J., Smith, B., & Krogfelt, K. (2011) Reduced diversity of the intestinal microbiota during infancy is associated with increased risk of allergic disease at school age. Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 128(3), 646-65200000. DOI: 10.1016/j.jaci.2011.04.060  

Stefka, A., Feehley, T., Tripathi, P., Qiu, J., McCoy, K., Mazmanian, S., Tjota, M., Seo, G., Cao, S., Theriault, B.... (2014) Commensal bacteria protect against food allergen sensitization. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1412008111  

Williams NT. (2010) Probiotics. American journal of health-system pharmacy : AJHP : official journal of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, 67(6), 449-58. PMID: 20208051  

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