Post List

  • April 27, 2016
  • 02:23 PM
  • 70 views

Rafting Ants Have Designated Stations

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish



Sometimes at the climax of a Star Trek episode, the captain would yell out "Battle stations!" and send the crew scurrying frantically through the corridors. It wasn't really clear what those battle stations were. Presumably, crew members headed to posts they'd been previously assigned, and this let the whole ship react to the crisis efficiently.

Certain ants respond to a crisis by binding their bodies together into floating rafts. And like the Star Trek crew, they seem to have designat........ Read more »

  • April 27, 2016
  • 10:35 AM
  • 110 views

Food to Restore a Heart

by Aurametrix team in Health Technologies

We know that diet, exercise and low-stress life will keep the heart healthy. But sometimes things happen that are beyond our control. Thanks to more coordinated, faster emergency response and improved treatment, heart attacks aren't as deadly as they used to be. But survivors still face a substantial risk of further cardiovascular events. How to restore after a heart attack and prevent another one? What to do besides obvious things such as taking medications, reducing stress, calories, avoidin........ Read more »

Li S, Flint A, Pai JK, Forman JP, Hu FB, Willett WC, Rexrode KM, Mukamal KJ, & Rimm EB. (2014) Low carbohydrate diet from plant or animal sources and mortality among myocardial infarction survivors. Journal of the American Heart Association, 3(5). PMID: 25246449  

  • April 27, 2016
  • 10:00 AM
  • 66 views

Why Science Matters to Our Dogs and Cats

by CAPB in Companion Animal Psychology Blog

Science – and science blogging – can help animal welfare in important ways.We wish our companion animals to lead a charmed life and always be happy. We want our dogs and cats to have a wonderful relationship with us. But we can’t achieve this if we don’t know what they need and how we should interact with them.Last year, some readers took part in a survey of who reads science blogs. The preliminary results are out, and it’s got me thinking about why science – and science blogging –........ Read more »

  • April 27, 2016
  • 09:39 AM
  • 64 views

Video Tip of the Week: SoyBase CMap

by Mary in OpenHelix

Over the years I’ve started to follow a lot of farmers on twitter. It might sound odd to folks who are immersed in human genomics and disease. But I actually find the plant and animal genomics communities to be pushing tech faster and further to the hands of end-users than a lot of the clinical […]... Read more »

Grant, D., Nelson, R., Cannon, S., & Shoemaker, R. (2009) SoyBase, the USDA-ARS soybean genetics and genomics database. Nucleic Acids Research, 38(Database). DOI: 10.1093/nar/gkp798  

  • April 27, 2016
  • 08:35 AM
  • 64 views

Your Body Has A Photographic Memory

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

For the first time anywhere - an easy explanation of your immune system in 1500 words! For the low, low price of zero dollars you can find out how your body protects you better the second time you are exposed to a disease. Special bonus offer – we’ll throw in how vaccines work and why you need one every year for the flu, although your old flu vaccines might still be helping you. ... Read more »

  • April 27, 2016
  • 07:02 AM
  • 9 views

A cure for the know-it-all: “Reflecting on explanatory ability” 

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Most of us think we know more than we actually do and sometimes, that sense is taken to an extreme that can be annoying (as well as inaccurate). Two years ago, we wrote about a study on modulating political extremism and mentioned the recommended strategy was similar to one we use to topple self-appointed “experts” […]

Related posts:
Uncommon Wisdom: Lessons from Patent and IP  Mock Jurors
So can you explain how that works in your own words?
Guilt-proneness and the ability to recog........ Read more »

  • April 27, 2016
  • 04:30 AM
  • 68 views

Should We Drop the Vertical Drop Jump?

by Nicole Cattano in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Performance on the vertical drop jump landing task was not found to be associated with anterior cruciate ligament injury risk in a group of female handball and soccer athletes. ... Read more »

  • April 27, 2016
  • 03:07 AM
  • 80 views

The A Word: the science behind...

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

The A WordI'm not typically inclined to talk about TV programmes on this blog (well, not usually) but today I'm making an exception based on the conclusion of the BBC drama series 'The A Word' last evening.For those who might not know, this [fictional] series charts the ups and downs of a family living in the Lake District whose lives are in one way or another touched by autism as a function of a 5-year old boy diagnosed with the condition. The show had a notable addition to the cast with a very........ Read more »

  • April 27, 2016
  • 03:00 AM
  • 21 views

Are certain groups of people more likely to leave suicide notes?

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

It is a sad fact that we can never ask of the hundreds of thousands of people around the world who take their own lives each year – why did you do it? Instead, psychologists talk to people who attempted, but failed, to kill themselves, and they also look into the minds' of suicide victims through the notes that they leave. But in fact only a minority of suicide victims leave notes, and the validity of studying these notes depends in part of the assumption that victims who leave notes are the s........ Read more »

  • April 26, 2016
  • 10:42 AM
  • 71 views

You Scratch My Back

by AG McCluskey in Zongo's Cancer Diaries

Where does the idea of a scientist as a crazed loner come from. Let's work together!... Read more »

Brown, R., Deletic, A., & Wong, T. (2015) Interdisciplinarity: How to catalyse collaboration. Nature, 525(7569), 315-317. DOI: 10.1038/525315a  

AG McCluskey. (2016) You Scratch My Back.. Zongo's Cancer Diaries. info:/

  • April 26, 2016
  • 08:57 AM
  • 83 views

Human sacrifice, inequality, and cycles of political power

by gdw in FictionalFieldwork

Human sacrifice to preserve inequality Statistically speaking (wait, wait, don’t click away, I know this is not the most enticing opening, but bear with me), you and me, we are not part of the 1%, or the 0.01%, that in most Western societies holds a disproportionate amount of influence and resources. Secretly, though, we want […]... Read more »

  • April 26, 2016
  • 07:02 AM
  • 78 views

Gently frying your eyeballs at work

by Rosin Cerate in Rosin Cerate

When I was a kid, I got thwacked in the face with a golf club. It was totally my fault. I was goofing around with my cousins (as one does) and failed to notice one of them winding up for a swing. Ended up with four stitches, the first one just half an inch from my left eye.... Read more »

  • April 26, 2016
  • 05:06 AM
  • 12 views

Teaching children the ancient "mental abacus" technique boosted their maths abilities more than normal extra tuition

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

Seeing an expert abacus user in action is a sight to behold. Their hands are a blur as they perform arithmetic operations far quicker than anyone using an electronic calculator. The mental abacus technique is even more impressive – it works just the same as a real abacus, except that you visualise moving the beads in your mind's eye (check out this video of people using mental abacus to perform amazing feats of arithmetic).Surprisingly, there is little research on the benefits of teaching the ........ Read more »

  • April 26, 2016
  • 03:10 AM
  • 81 views

Bacterial origin and transferability of depression?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

The paper by Zheng and colleagues [1] caught my eye recently and the interesting ideas that "dysbiosis of the gut microbiome may have a causal role in the development of depressive-like behaviors" and "transplantation of GF [germ-free] mice with ‘depression microbiota’ derived from MDD [major depressive disorder] patients resulted in depression-like behaviors compared with colonization with ‘healthy microbiota’ derived from healthy control individuals."Bearing in........ Read more »

  • April 25, 2016
  • 11:18 AM
  • 84 views

Liver Regeneration in Living Donors

by Cristy at Living Donor 101 in Living Donors Are People Too

The authors examined the liver function and liver volume of 91 right liver lobe donors. Within a year of donating, 96% had regained full liver function but only 85% had full pre-donation liver volume.   Unfortunately, these results say nothing about the long term risk of scarring (cirrhosis) or otherwise.   Duclos J, Bhangui P, …
Continue reading »
The post Liver Regeneration in Living Donors appeared first on Living Donors Are People Too.
... Read more »

Duclos J, Bhangui P, Salloum C, Andreani P, Saliba F, Ichai P, Elmaleh A, Castaing D, & Azoulay D. (2016) Ad Integrum Functional and Volumetric Recovery in Right Lobe Living Donors: Is It Really Complete 1 Year After Donor Hepatectomy?. American journal of transplantation : official journal of the American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons, 16(1), 143-56. PMID: 26280997  

  • April 25, 2016
  • 07:02 AM
  • 92 views

“Creepiness”: You know it when you see it! 

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

You know what ‘creepy’ is and in the movie The Silence of the Lambs, Anthony Hopkins personified creepiness. While it may be hard to believe, no one has ever “pinned down” what makes a person creepy. Since there must be a need for such information, enter academic Francis McAndrew of Knox University (in Galesburg, Illinois), […]

Related posts:
Who among the British people is 100% heterosexual? 
Don’t confuse me with your ethnicity!
Is there an effective strategy that reduces a........ Read more »

McAndrew, F., & Koehnke, S. (2016) On the nature of creepiness. New Ideas in Psychology,, 10-15. DOI: 10.1016/j.newideapsych.2016.03.003  

  • April 25, 2016
  • 06:39 AM
  • 99 views

Yet more evidence for questionable research practices in original studies of Reproducibility Project: Psychology

by Richard Kunert in Brain's Idea

The replicability of psychological research is surprisingly low. Why? In this blog post I present new evidence showing that questionable research practices are at the heart of failures to replicate psychological effects. Quick recap. A recent publication in Science claims that only around 40% of psychological findings are replicable, based on 100 replication attempts in […]... Read more »

Asendorpf, J., Conner, M., De Fruyt, F., De Houwer, J., Denissen, J., Fiedler, K., Fiedler, S., Funder, D., Kliegl, R., Nosek, B.... (2013) Recommendations for Increasing Replicability in Psychology. European Journal of Personality, 27(2), 108-119. DOI: 10.1002/per.1919  

Gerber, A., Malhotra, N., Dowling, C., & Doherty, D. (2010) Publication Bias in Two Political Behavior Literatures. American Politics Research, 38(4), 591-613. DOI: 10.1177/1532673X09350979  

Head ML, Holman L, Lanfear R, Kahn AT, & Jennions MD. (2015) The extent and consequences of p-hacking in science. PLoS biology, 13(3). PMID: 25768323  

  • April 25, 2016
  • 04:30 AM
  • 82 views

Patient-Reported Outcome Measures Are Associated to Biochemical Markers

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Poor scores on the Knee Osteoarthritis Outcome Score and Tegner Activity Scale may be associated with elevated biomarker concentration levels that reflect collagen turnover.... Read more »

  • April 25, 2016
  • 04:20 AM
  • 12 views

Neuro Milgram – Your brain takes less ownership of actions that you perform under coercion

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

The new findings help explain why many people can be coerced so easilyBy guest blogger Mo CostandiIn a series of classic experiments performed in the early 1960s, Stanley Milgram created a situation in which a scientist instructed volunteers to deliver what they believed to be painful and deadly electric shocks to other people. Although this now infamous research has been criticised at length, people continue to be unsettled by its main finding – that most of the participants were quite willin........ Read more »

Caspar, E., Christensen, J., Cleeremans, A., & Haggard, P. (2016) Coercion Changes the Sense of Agency in the Human Brain. Current Biology, 26(5), 585-592. DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2015.12.067  

  • April 25, 2016
  • 02:15 AM
  • 103 views

Parenting a child with autism or ADHD: what the science says...

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

I'm talking about parenting again today. Two papers are served up for your reading interest today, providing an important 'science-based' perspective on the general experience of parenting a child who is also diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).The first paper by Britt Laugesen and colleagues [1] "aimed to identify and synthesize the best available evidence on parenting experiences of living with a child with attention-deficit hyper........ Read more »

Laugesen B, Lauritsen MB, Jørgensen R, Sørensen EE, Rasmussen P, & Grønkjær M. (2016) Living with a child with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: a systematic review. International journal of evidence-based healthcare. PMID: 27058250  

Khan, T., Ooi, K., Ong, Y., & Jacob, S. (2016) A meta-synthesis on parenting a child with autism. Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment, 745. DOI: 10.2147/NDT.S100634  

join us!

Do you write about peer-reviewed research in your blog? Use ResearchBlogging.org to make it easy for your readers — and others from around the world — to find your serious posts about academic research.

If you don't have a blog, you can still use our site to learn about fascinating developments in cutting-edge research from around the world.

Register Now

Research Blogging is powered by SMG Technology.

To learn more, visit seedmediagroup.com.