Post List

  • August 26, 2014
  • 07:51 PM
  • 128 views

Needles in a haystack: questioning the “fluidity” of ELF

by Ray Carey in ELFA project

As I’ve earlier argued on this blog, sometimes the claims of “fluidity”, “diversity”, and “innovation” found in English as a lingua franca (ELF) research are overstated. It’s so diverse that even ordinary diversity won’t do – it’s “super-diversity” now. It could very well be ultra-mega-diversity-squared, but the question of the prominence of these presumably innovative […]... Read more »

  • August 26, 2014
  • 07:01 PM
  • 94 views

Narcotics Anonymous for military veterans

by DJMac in Recovery Review

A few years back in a city far, far away, I asked a consultant addiction psychiatrist why he did not refer any of his patients to NA. “There’s not a shred of evidence that it works,” he said. Even then he was misinformed, but I’ve thought many times since then about how his patients were [...]
The post Narcotics Anonymous for military veterans appeared first on Recovery Review.
... Read more »

  • August 26, 2014
  • 02:50 PM
  • 112 views

August 26, 2014

by Erin Campbell in HighMag Blog

If you have little ones in your house, you might assume that the phrase “randomly fluctuating forces” is referring to your home. This phrase actually refers to the background force in a cell coming from active and motor-driven cell processes. Today’s image is from a study that developed a way to measure these forces. Actin- and microtubule-based motors move many types of material around a cell to drive critical cellular events. These motor-driven movements and other active processe........ Read more »

Guo, M., Ehrlicher, A., Jensen, M., Renz, M., Moore, J., Goldman, R., Lippincott-Schwartz, J., Mackintosh, F., & Weitz, D. (2014) Probing the Stochastic, Motor-Driven Properties of the Cytoplasm Using Force Spectrum Microscopy. Cell, 158(4), 822-832. DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2014.06.051  

  • August 26, 2014
  • 01:27 PM
  • 140 views

The Holographic Universe [we might Live in!]

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Are you feeling a little… flat? Well that might be because you are only in 2 dimensions. I know what you’re thinking, insane! Well first check the name of the business and second, check out the science. In fact, it may seem like a joke, but the math suggests that it could very well be true and with it could come a deeper understanding of the universe. Testing this hypothesis (which was first made in the late 90’s) has been harder to do than you might think, but that has now changed. We are........ Read more »

  • August 26, 2014
  • 12:09 PM
  • 93 views

For These Bats, the Best Falsetto Wins Over the Ladies

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish

A bat’s voice is its livelihood. Chirping and squeaking at just the right frequencies lets it echolocate food and stay alive. Sounding pretty isn’t the point—except when it is. For the first time, scientists think they’ve found a bat species in which females choose mates based on their voices. Even if a lower-frequency squeak might […]The post For These Bats, the Best Falsetto Wins Over the Ladies appeared first on Inkfish.... Read more »

  • August 26, 2014
  • 05:17 AM
  • 81 views

Drinking small amounts of alcohol boosts people's sense of smell

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

As our modern world relies overwhelmingly on sight and sound to transmit information, it might not strike you quite how acute our sense of smell is. In fact we humans can outperform the most sensitive measuring instruments in detecting certain odours, and distinguish smells from strangers from those of our blood relations. Now new research suggests our natural olfactory talents may be even greater when we use modest amounts of alcohol to reduce our inhibitions.A team led by Yaara Endevelt-S........ Read more »

  • August 26, 2014
  • 04:39 AM
  • 144 views

Brian Hooker's Hooked Hoax: Measles-Mumps-Rubella (MMR) Vaccination and Autism Spectrum Disorder

by Alexis Delanoir in How to Paint Your Panda

10 years after the initial study by DeStefano et al. (2004) was conducted, famous anti-vaccine alarmist Brian Hooker, along with Andrew Wakefield, are talking about a "whistleblower" in the CDC claiming that the original data was fraudulent, and was masking a 336% increased risk in ASD in African American boys receiving the MMR vaccine "on time." Did Hooker prove anything in his new study, however? Only that he doesn't understand epidemiology or statistics.... Read more »

  • August 26, 2014
  • 03:55 AM
  • 113 views

76% of youths with autism meet ADHD diagnostic criteria?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Autism is not normally a stand-alone diagnosis. I've mentioned that point a few times on this blog, stressing how a clinical diagnosis of autism appears to increase the risk of various other behavioural, psychiatric and somatic diagnoses also [variably] being present over a lifetime. Part of that comorbidity has been talked about in discussions about ESSENCE (see here) and the excellent document produced by Treating Autism on medical comorbidities occurring alongside autism (see here) for exampl........ Read more »

  • August 25, 2014
  • 07:13 PM
  • 101 views

Zombie Ant Fungi knows it’s prey

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

So awhile back I was bored and to kill some time wisely I wrote this little bit on real life (sometime potential) zombies. It featured a special section on a particular group of fungi that created some really crazy zombie ants. Ants, which would do the bidding of the fungus, would eventually latch itself in a “death bite” and sprout the parasite from its head. Yeah I know, not a pleasant death. In any case new research is showing just how cool — and evidently smart — these fungi really a........ Read more »

de Bekker C, Quevillon LE, Smith PB, Fleming KR, Ghosh D, Patterson AD, & Hughes DP. (2014) Species-specific ant brain manipulation by a specialized fungal parasite. BMC evolutionary biology, 14(1), 166. PMID: 25085339  

  • August 25, 2014
  • 03:38 PM
  • 89 views

Unpacking Recovery Part 3: Can Patients Imagine Recovery?

by Andrea in Science of Eating Disorders


Today I have the distinct pleasure of writing about one of my favourite articles about eating disorder recovery by Malson et al. (2011) exploring how inpatients talk about eating disorder recovery. I have personally found this article to be very helpful in understanding some of the difficulties of understanding and achieving recovery in our social context.
As Malson and colleagues explain (and as we’ve established), eating disorder recovery is elusive. Often, poor prognosis is described ........ Read more »

Malson H, Bailey L, Clarke S, Treasure J, Anderson G, & Kohn M. (2011) Un/imaginable future selves: a discourse analysis of in-patients' talk about recovery from an 'eating disorder'. European eating disorders review : the journal of the Eating Disorders Association, 19(1), 25-36. PMID: 21182163  

  • August 25, 2014
  • 02:56 PM
  • 100 views

Coronavirus proteases, p62/SQSTM1, and Deubiquitinases

by theloenvirologist in Virology Tidbits

Ubiquitin is a small protein of 9kDa inside present in all eukaryotic cells and involved in the degradation of proteins by covalently binding target proteins which requires different enzymes, the E1 activating enzyme, the E2 conjugation enzymes, and the E3 ubiquitin ligase. Deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) can reverse the ubiquitination of substrates thus preventing the degradation of proteins and can be classified into two main classes, cysteine proteases and metalloproteases. Here the role of t........ Read more »

van Kasteren PB, Bailey-Elkin BA, James TW, Ninaber DK, Beugeling C, Khajehpour M, Snijder EJ, Mark BL, & Kikkert M. (2013) Deubiquitinase function of arterivirus papain-like protease 2 suppresses the innate immune response in infected host cells. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 110(9). PMID: 23401522  

Ratia K, Saikatendu KS, Santarsiero BD, Barretto N, Baker SC, Stevens RC, & Mesecar AD. (2006) Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus papain-like protease: structure of a viral deubiquitinating enzyme. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 103(15), 5717-22. PMID: 16581910  

Clementz MA, Chen Z, Banach BS, Wang Y, Sun L, Ratia K, Baez-Santos YM, Wang J, Takayama J, Ghosh AK.... (2010) Deubiquitinating and interferon antagonism activities of coronavirus papain-like proteases. Journal of virology, 84(9), 4619-29. PMID: 20181693  

  • August 25, 2014
  • 12:02 PM
  • 110 views

Spoiler Alert!: Are You Wasting Your Time Avoiding Spoilers?

by Melissa Chernick in Science Storiented

Lately I have been cranking though a lot of media – TV, movies, books, podcasts, etc. To the point that I start to wonder how I have time for actual life. During this mass consumption of media, I've been thinking about, and discussing with friends, the topic of spoilers. Bring up this topic with just about anyone and you’ll find that it’s actually a pretty controversial one. As for me, I fall in the no spoilers category. Spoil one of my beloved TV shows and you will go from friend to “fr........ Read more »

Leavitt, J., & Christenfeld, N. (2011) Story Spoilers Don't Spoil Stories. Psychological Science, 22(9), 1152-1154. DOI: 10.1177/0956797611417007  

  • August 25, 2014
  • 11:11 AM
  • 107 views

E-cigs Aren't Safe

by Viputheshwar Sitaraman in Draw Science

Vaping through e-cigs brings out the harms in components of nicotine that are considered nanoparticles that can clog the smaller airways in our lungs.... Read more »

Grana, R., Benowitz, N., & Glantz, S. (2014) E-Cigarettes: A Scientific Review. Circulation, 129(19), 1972-1986. DOI: 10.1161/​CIRCULATIONAHA.114.007667  

  • August 25, 2014
  • 09:00 AM
  • 57 views

Awe and the supernatural

by Katharine Blackwell in Contemplating Cognition

Majestic mountains, vibrant vistas, stunning scenery – and, perhaps, the transformation of a blob of molten glass into a rearing horse – these are sights that can truly be awe-inspiring, generating those feelings of reverence and wonder. They make time seem to slow down. But do they also make it seem more likely that there must be some creator or supernatural being behind it all?... Read more »

Valdesolo P, & Graham J. (2014) Awe, uncertainty, and agency detection. Psychological Science, 25(1), 170-178. PMID: 24247728  

  • August 25, 2014
  • 08:28 AM
  • 146 views

Chinese Food And The One Hour Dilemma

by Mark E. Lasbury in The 'Scope

Everyone thinks they have the answer to why you get hungry soon after eating a plate of Chinese food, but it may be more complex than a simple answer. Some people blame MSG, others say it is the higher glycemic index of rice and noodles, while others claim it is the low fat, low protein aspects of Chinese food. New studies shows that MSG, high glycemic index foods and vegetable protein diets do not alter satiety and hunger hormone levels as compared to other meal types. It may be that the satiet........ Read more »

  • August 25, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 138 views

Women are easily misled so why not lie to them in negotiations?

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

Back in 2012, we wrote about which gender was the more moral in negotiations. (Spoiler alert: it was women.) Now we have a new article on why women get lied to in negotiations. Not when or if–but why. Basically, people believe women are more easily misled than men and people believe women to be less […]

Related posts:
Which is the more moral negotiator? The male or the female?
Negotiating Salary 101 for Women Only
Negotiations: Starting high and ending with nothing


... Read more »

Kray, LJ, Kennedy, JA, & Van Zant, AB. (2014) Not competent enough to know the difference? Gender stereotypes about women’s ease of being misled predict negotiator deception. . Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes. info:/

  • August 25, 2014
  • 07:00 AM
  • 90 views

The Curious Case of a Protein and a Pilus

by Moselio Schaechter in Small Things Considered

by Monika Buczek | If you’re like me, every morning you reluctantly roll out of bed and automatically reach for your toothbrush. One of the earliest learned practices of personal hygiene, brushing surely serves more than just preventing daybreak halitosis- but have you ever pondered about the plaque you try to dislodge from your…... Read more »

Reardon-Robinson ME, Wu C, Mishra A, Chang C, Bier N, Das A, & Ton-That H. (2014) Pilus hijacking by a bacterial coaggregation factor critical for oral biofilm development. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 111(10), 3835-40. PMID: 24567409  

  • August 25, 2014
  • 04:41 AM
  • 70 views

Your angry face makes you look stronger

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

No matter where you travel on earth, you'll likely have no problem recognising when someone is angry with you. From the plains of Russia to the beaches of Brazil, anger shows itself in a tell-tale facial display involving lowered brow, snarled nose, raised chin and thinned lips.A popular view has it that, besides reliably conveying anger, this particular constellation of facial movements is arbitrary and serves no other function. A team of evolutionary psychologists led by Aaron Sell disagrees. ........ Read more »

Sell, A., Cosmides, L., & Tooby, J. (2014) The human anger face evolved to enhance cues of strength. Evolution and Human Behavior, 35(5), 425-429. DOI: 10.1016/j.evolhumbehav.2014.05.008  

  • August 25, 2014
  • 04:40 AM
  • 123 views

mTOR-regulated autophagy and autism mouse models

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

I was intrigued to read the paper by Guomei Tang and colleagues [1] (open-access) and their assertion that: "mTOR [mammalian target of rapamycin]-regulated autophagy is required for developmental spine pruning, and activation of neuronal autophagy corrects synaptic pathology and social behavior deficits in ASD [autism spectrum disorder] models with hyperactivated mTOR"."Re-verify our range to target... one ping only".If that opening paragraph sounds like scientific gibberish,........ Read more »

Tang, G., Gudsnuk, K., Kuo, S., Cotrina, M., Rosoklija, G., Sosunov, A., Sonders, M., Kanter, E., Castagna, C., Yamamoto, A.... (2014) Loss of mTOR-Dependent Macroautophagy Causes Autistic-like Synaptic Pruning Deficits. Neuron. DOI: 10.1016/j.neuron.2014.07.040  

  • August 25, 2014
  • 02:39 AM
  • 135 views

Autobiographical Memory for a Life-Threatening Airline Disaster

by The Neurocritic in The Neurocritic

“My attention shifts to the fact that the comforting engine hum is eerily gone. Where has the comforting hum of the engines gone. Something has gone very, very wrong, the plane continued to shake.” -Daniel Goncalves, recalling the terror of Air Transat Flight 236I'm sitting here in an airport, reading a harrowing first person account of Air Transat Flight 236, which fell out of the sky when it lost all power on Aug. 24, 2001.The plane was bound from Toronto, Ontario to Lisbon, Portugal........ Read more »

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