Post List

  • November 26, 2014
  • 04:54 AM
  • 109 views

The gut microbiome in Down Syndrome

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

The recent preliminary findings from Elena Biagi and colleagues [1] (open-access) reporting on the constitution of the gut microbiome - the collected bacteria which reside in the deepest, darkest recesses of our gastrointestinal (GI) tract - in a small number of cases of Down's syndrome caught my eye recently.It's a funny feeling being taken under the wing of a dragonPerhaps a little bit unusually looking at the gut microbiome because of the link between premature ageing in Down's syndrome ........ Read more »

Biagi E, Candela M, Centanni M, Consolandi C, Rampelli S, Turroni S, Severgnini M, Peano C, Ghezzo A, Scurti M.... (2014) Gut Microbiome in Down Syndrome. PloS one, 9(11). PMID: 25386941  

  • November 26, 2014
  • 02:42 AM
  • 113 views

Design for Postponement

by Andreas Wieland in Supply Chain Management Research

Today, I would like to draw your attention to one of my favorite articles in the field of supply chain management: Design for Postponement by Swaminathan & Lee (2003). The article identifies three key postponement enablers: First, process standardization, where the initial steps of a process are standardized across a product line and distinct personalities […]... Read more »

Swaminathan, J.M., & Lee, H.L. (2003) Design for Postponement. Handbooks in Operations Research and Management Science, 199-226. DOI: 10.1016/S0927-0507(03)11005-5  

  • November 26, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 88 views

Self-Reported Knee Outcomes Can Be Used to Help Determine Functional Assessment Readiness after an ACL Reconstruction

by Nicole Cattano in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

The subjective IKDC-2000 form can be used to determine when a participant may be ready to be functionally assessed for a possible return to play. The participants who have IKDC-2000 scores that are lower than normative data have a high likelihood of failing a battery of functional tests. ... Read more »

  • November 25, 2014
  • 05:17 PM
  • 131 views

Blu-ray solar power

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

So here’s something you don’t see everyday. Blu-ray disks, you know the stuff we use for video games or DVDs also improve the performance of solar cells—suggesting a second use for unwanted discs—according to new research from Northwestern University. As surprising as this was, there is even better news, we know why they improve performance.... Read more »

  • November 25, 2014
  • 01:18 PM
  • 124 views

Oy. I worry about this with cell line studies a lot. Mis-IDed contaminated.

by Mary in OpenHelix

Via NCBI Announce mailing list: NCBI BioSample includes curated list of over 400 known misidentified and contaminated cell lines The NCBI BioSample database now includes a curated list of over 400 known misidentified and contaminated cell lines. Scientists should check this list before they start working with a new cell line to see if that cell line […]... Read more »

American Type Culture Collection Standards Development Organization Workgroup ASN-0002. (2010) Cell line misidentification: the beginning of the end. Nature Reviews Cancer, 10(6), 441-448. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nrc2852  

  • November 25, 2014
  • 12:12 PM
  • 78 views

Why you're particularly likely to run your first marathon when your age ends in a "9"

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

When we look at our lives, we tend to break them up into chapters, rather like the seasons of a TV box set. Potential dividers come in many forms, including the dawn of a new year, or the start of a new job. But if those events act as a marker between episodes, it is the decades of our lives that represent the more profound end of one series or season and the start of the next.According to the psychologists Adam Alter and Hal Hershfield, when we're on the cusp of one of these boundaries - in oth........ Read more »

Alter, A.L., & Hershfield, H.E. (2014) People search for meaning when they approach a new decade in chronological age. PNAS. info:/

  • November 25, 2014
  • 08:00 AM
  • 102 views

As A Bird - It's No Turkey

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

The turkey is an amazing bird, beyond it’s taste on Thanksgiving. It has some really funky structures on its head, like the caruncles, wattle and snood, but research shows that they are important in mate selection. The question is why they have been retained even though they are artificially bred nowadays. Maybe they are for more than just mate selection. And yes....turkeys can fly.... Read more »

  • November 25, 2014
  • 04:14 AM
  • 67 views

When Korea imposed a limit on working hours, did it make people happier?

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

Across different professions, many people are familiar with the sense of having to deliver more with less, meaning clocking-off time falls later and later. One way to protect workers’ rights, and look after their wellbeing, is to introduce working hours restrictions. But a new paper by Korea University's Robert Rudolf investigates the impact of such a reform, and its conclusions are disappointing.Beginning its roll-out in 2004, the (South) Korean Five Day Working Reform was intended to manage ........ Read more »

  • November 25, 2014
  • 03:20 AM
  • 114 views

Serotonin - melatonin (and the in-betweeners) linked to autism

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

The paper by Pagan and colleagues [1] (open-access) looking at "serotonin, melatonin and the intermediate N-acetylserotonin (NAS) in a large cohort of patients with ASD [autism spectrum disorder] and their relatives" set the old grey-pink matter into action recently. Not only because I have some real interest in the starting material for these compounds - the aromatic amino acid known as tryptophan - but because this research group included some quite important analysis of the enz........ Read more »

Pagan C, Delorme R, Callebert J, Goubran-Botros H, Amsellem F, Drouot X, Boudebesse C, Le Dudal K, Ngo-Nguyen N, Laouamri H.... (2014) The serotonin-N-acetylserotonin-melatonin pathway as a biomarker for autism spectrum disorders. Translational psychiatry. PMID: 25386956  

  • November 25, 2014
  • 01:00 AM
  • 127 views

Adventures in correcting the (semi-)scientific record

by Ray Carey in ELFA project

One of the blogs I follow is Retraction Watch, which documents the world of quality control in scientific research – pre-publication peer review (and its abuses); post-publication peer review in fora such as research blogs; retractions and corrections by journals; and plagiarism and fraud. The large majority of cases they report on are drawn from […]... Read more »

  • November 25, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 100 views

Kinesiotaping with Exercise Versus Manual Therapy with Exercise in Patients with Subacromial Impingement Syndrome

by Lauren Hankle, Kayla Green in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Kinesiotaping with exercise and manual therapy with exercise are both effective in decreasing pain and disability in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome. The kinesiotaping with exercise intervention was more effective in decreasing pain at night than the manual therapy with exercise treatment group. ... Read more »

  • November 24, 2014
  • 11:19 PM
  • 93 views

JUST PUBLISHED: Not Just Pineapple and Water: How do People Integrate Information from Multiple Sources?

by Mark Rubin in The University of Newcastle's School of Psychology Newsline

When choosing a restaurant for a dinner with friends we need to combine information prior to decision, concerning the location, menu, and price range. Similarly, when crossing a busy road, we sometimes need to integrate information from multiple sources, such as horn sounds and the sight of approaching cars. A recent paper published by myself and colleagues does not tell you which restaurant to choose for your party or how to safely cross the road. Rather, it provides a means for evaluating how ........ Read more »

  • November 24, 2014
  • 03:26 PM
  • 97 views

Hiding cells to prevent HIV transmission

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

The fight against HIV is ongoing and despite our rapid progression against the disease we still lack a cure or even adequate treatment for people infected. However, new research suggests that cloaking immune cells with antibodies that block T cell trafficking to the gut can substantially reduce the risk of viral transmission, at least in a non-human primate model of HIV infection. If it works out, this could help slow down the spread of HIV and give people a better shot at a normal life.... Read more »

  • November 24, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 99 views

Thin-slicing infidelity: Brief observation can reveal more than you ever thought!

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Our clients are routinely stunned by the accuracy of  mock juror impressions of witnesses and parties based on a 6 to 8 minute video clip from depositions. Mock jurors quickly assess character and are often eager to share their insights. Their comments can be insightful, surprising, and sometimes biting in their judgments. So, okay. It’s […]

Related posts:
Unfaithful partner? Would you rather be seen as mature– or as competent and strong?
A law firm’s financial success & the ........ Read more »

  • November 24, 2014
  • 05:15 AM
  • 110 views

Helicobacter pylori and stem cells in the gastric crypt

by Artem Kaznatcheev in Evolutionary Games Group

Last Friday, the 4th Integrated Mathematical Oncology Workshop finished here at Moffitt. The event drew a variety of internal and external participants — you can see a blurry photo of many of them above — and was structured as a competition between four teams specializing in four different domains: Microbiome, Hepatitis C, Human papillomavirus, and […]... Read more »

Houghton, J., Stoicov, C., Nomura, S., Rogers, A.B., Carlson, J., Li, H., Cai, X., Fox, J.G., Goldenring, J.R., & Wang, T.C. (2004) Gastric cancer originating from bone marrow-derived cells. Science, 306(5701), 1568-71. PMID: 15567866  

  • November 24, 2014
  • 05:00 AM
  • 86 views

Removable functional appliances do not change skeletal pattern to a clinically meaningful amount

by Kevin OBrien in Kevin OBrien's Orthodontic Blog

Functional appliances do not influence skeletal pattern… This post is on functional appliances, which is an area that I have covered several times. A few postings ago I mentioned that the journals are publishing more and more systematic reviews. I also made the point in a previous post, that we need to critically read these […]
The post Removable functional appliances do not change skeletal pattern to a clinically meaningful amount appeared first on Kevin O'Brien's Orthodon........ Read more »

  • November 24, 2014
  • 04:29 AM
  • 93 views

Finland, parental migration and offspring Asperger syndrome

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

A quote from the paper by Venla Lehti and colleagues [1] to start things off: "The study showed that children whose parents are both immigrants have a significantly lower likelihood of being diagnosed with Asperger's syndrome than those with two Finnish parents."Can I cook, or can't I?Based on an analysis of data derived from "the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register" and "the Finnish Medical Birth Register", researchers looked at the records of children with a diagnosis of Asperger syndrome (AS)........ Read more »

Lehti V, Cheslack-Postava K, Gissler M, Hinkka-Yli-Salomäki S, Brown AS, & Sourander A. (2014) Parental migration and Asperger's syndrome. European child . PMID: 25381114  

  • November 24, 2014
  • 04:22 AM
  • 61 views

Happy people think they're good at empathising with the pain of others. They're wrong

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

Which of your friends - the happier, or the more melancholy - is better at spotting your excitement that Chris is attending your birthday, or that a B+ has left you disappointed?Evidence suggests that more upbeat people consider themselves especially empathic, and it would be reasonable to believe them, given that they know more people on average, and tend to form deeper, more trusting relationships. The reality, however, is more complicated. New research led by Yale's Hillary Devlin suggests th........ Read more »

  • November 24, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 92 views

Experiences With Workplace Bullying Among Athletic Trainers in the Collegiate Setting

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Among athletic trainers working in a college setting 14% reported that they were bullied, and 20% reported that they witnessed bullying. There were no differences between who experienced bullying, but most of the bullying perpetrators were males with the majority being coaches.... Read more »

  • November 23, 2014
  • 11:49 PM
  • 72 views

Do you play disc-golf? Did you ever consider your environmental impact?

by Ashley D in The Average Visitor

Back when I lived in Wisconsin, one of my closest friends was the physical education teacher at the school I worked at. At some point during our friendship he invited me to play “disc-golf” with him one day after school.  At the time I had absolutely no clue what he was asking me to do […]... Read more »

Yu-Fai Leung, Chelsey Walden-Schreiner, Craig Matisoff, Michael Naber, & . (2010) A two-pronged approach to evaluating environmental concerns of disc golf as emerging recreation in urban natural areas. Managing Leisure, 18(4). info:/

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