Post List

  • August 21, 2014
  • 01:02 PM
  • 129 views

Jonas Salk and the Polio Comeback

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Jonas Salk, you should know this name, but chances are you don’t. He was the inventor of the polio vaccine, a disease that was feared more than the atomic bomb. Today we don’t think about it, no one “gets” polio anymore. Scientists get a bad rap today with the whole “autism-vaccine” BS. But they don’t know Salk, instead of making a small [see: huge] fortune from the drug, he refused to patent it and gave it to the people for essentially free. You think this story would have a happy........ Read more »

Drexler JF, Grard G, Lukashev AN, Kozlovskaya LI, Böttcher S, Uslu G, Reimerink J, Gmyl AP, Taty-Taty R, Lekana-Douki SE.... (2014) Robustness against serum neutralization of a poliovirus type 1 from a lethal epidemic of poliomyelitis in the Republic of Congo in 2010. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. PMID: 25136105  

  • August 21, 2014
  • 11:27 AM
  • 130 views

Back to the future - Psychologists investigate why some people see the future as being behind them

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

Speakers of English and many other languages refer to the future as being in front, and the past behind (e.g. "I look forward to seeing you"). This manner of thinking and speaking is so entrenched, we rarely pause to consider why we do it. One influential and intuitive explanation is that humans have an obvious front (the way our heads face), which combined with our tendency to think about time in terms of space, leads us to see ourselves moving forwards into the future, or the future coming tow........ Read more »

  • August 21, 2014
  • 10:48 AM
  • 115 views

August 21, 2014

by Erin Campbell in HighMag Blog

Microtubules are known for their fascinating dynamics, but some cellular processes require a more stable microtubule cytoskeleton. Thankfully, these stable, acetylated microtubules are just as photogenic as their non-modified microtubule pals. Today’s image is from a paper describing the role of the protein paxillin in microtubule acetylation. Crawling cells require coordination of adhesive forces, cytoskeletal rearrangements, and cell polarization. Cell polarization helps to direct newly........ Read more »

  • August 21, 2014
  • 10:43 AM
  • 122 views

Can relationships with fictional characters aid our self development?

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

"... forming a relationship with an interesting but potentially dangerous character does not present the same obstacles in the narrative world as it might in the physical world.”By guest blogger Robin Abrahams.If you’ve been on the internet at all this year, you may have noticed an explosion of fiction-based personality quizzes. What house would you belong to in Hogwarts—or in Westeros? Which “Mad Man” are you? What Shakespeare role were you born to play?Why do we want to know?Res........ Read more »

Shedlosky-Shoemaker, R., Costabile, K., & Arkin, R. (2014) Self-Expansion through Fictional Characters. Self and Identity, 13(5), 556-578. DOI: 10.1080/15298868.2014.882269  

  • August 21, 2014
  • 08:03 AM
  • 98 views

Payment System Protects Privacy of EV Owners

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

A new electronic payment system created at A*STAR aims to protect the privacy of EV owners recharging their electric cars.... Read more »

Au, M., Liu, J., Fang, J., Jiang, Z., Susilo, W., & Zhou, J. (2014) A New Payment System for Enhancing Location Privacy of Electric Vehicles. IEEE Transactions on Vehicular Technology, 63(1), 3-18. DOI: 10.1109/TVT.2013.2274288  

  • August 21, 2014
  • 03:56 AM
  • 124 views

Autism, ADHD and allergy: Taiwan and big data (again)

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"Children with ADHD [attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder] or ASD [autism spectrum disorder] had an increased risk of allergic comorbidities, and those with both ADHD and ASD had the highest"."You built a time machine.. out of a DeLorean"That was the conclusion arrived at in the paper by Ting-Yang Lin and colleagues [1]. For regular readers of this blog, this was yet another example of how Taiwan leads the way when it comes to the concept of 'big data' specifically employ........ Read more »

Lin, T., Lin, P., Su, T., Chen, Y., Hsu, J., Huang, K., Chang, W., Chen, T., Pan, T., Chen, M.... (2014) Autistic spectrum disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and allergy: Is there a link? A nationwide study. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 8(10), 1333-1338. DOI: 10.1016/j.rasd.2014.07.009  

  • August 21, 2014
  • 02:21 AM
  • 135 views

Do You Believe in Dog? A New Ball Game

by Cobb & Hecht in Do You Believe In Dog?

Hello Do You Believe in Dog(ers)!(source)After two years of mostly pen-pal style blogging, we're excited to share our new direction!When we first decided to create Do You Believe in Dog?, we committed to blogging back and forth about canine science for two years. We were able to celebrate achieving that goal at the recent 4th Canine Science Forum in Lincoln, UK and also reflect on the future of Do You Believe in Dog?The DYBID blog, Facebook and Twitter feeds have become vibrant places to ac........ Read more »

Fischhoff B., & Scheufele D. (2013) The science of science communication. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 110(Supplement 3), 14033-14039. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1213273110  

  • August 21, 2014
  • 01:30 AM
  • 147 views

How to prevent a possible concussion from the ALS ice bucket challenge

by William Lu in The Quantum Lobe Chronicles

The ice bucket challenge has swept the nation in an effort to raise awareness for ALS. However, there seems to have been a number of concussions (or mild traumatic brain injuries) sustained from performing a seemingly altruistic act. Although some people may find the below video funny, concussions are a serious issue and can lead to serious consequences including executive dysfunction. Symptoms can include short loss of consciousness, feeling dazed and confused, loss of immediate memory, headach........ Read more »

  • August 20, 2014
  • 07:03 PM
  • 111 views

Anthropogenic climate change and glacial loss explained by a single number: 25!

by Jonathan Trinastic in Goodnight Earth

New analyses using climate circulation models and glacial dynamics indicates that anthropogenic forcing has caused 25% of glacial loss over the past 150 years and 69% over the past two decades.... Read more »

  • August 20, 2014
  • 07:01 PM
  • 102 views

Stigma – a good thing?

by DJMac in Recovery Review

Stigma discredits individuals and groups, reducing social status and creating ‘spoiled identities’, says Goffman. It’s not a good thing. But hang on a minute – might it have a positive function? Could it actually help in terms of public health? Help by changing behaviour through societal pressure. If so, that would be a good thing, [...]
The post Stigma – a good thing? appeared first on Recovery Review.
... Read more »

  • August 20, 2014
  • 03:41 PM
  • 112 views

Cool Burning Flames Could Lead to Better Engines

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

A team of international researchers has discovered a new type of cool burning flames that could lead to greener, more efficient combustion engines.... Read more »

Dietrich, D., Nayagam, V., Hicks, M., Ferkul, P., Dryer, F., Farouk, T., Shaw, B., Suh, H., Choi, M., Liu, Y.... (2014) Droplet Combustion Experiments Aboard the International Space Station. Microgravity Science and Technology. DOI: 10.1007/s12217-014-9372-2  

  • August 20, 2014
  • 01:22 PM
  • 129 views

Agriculture, Inequality and Cremation in Iron Age Spain

by Katy Meyers in Bones Don't Lie

One of the major debates in archaeology is when do we begin to see inequality among human groups, and what caused this this to happen. Social inequality has been defined […]... Read more »

JORGE DE TORRES RODRÍGUEZ. (2014) A PLACE FOR EVERYONE. THE STRUCTURE OF ARROYO CULEBRO D CEMETERY AND THE SOCIAL ORGANIZATION IN THE MIDDLE TAGUS VALLEY IRON AGE (SPAIN). Oxford Journal of Archaeology. info:/

  • August 20, 2014
  • 12:30 PM
  • 118 views

The DNA Signature of Lupus

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

My Uncle suffered from Lupus. The disease itself should have a more sinister sounding name, given the effect it has on the body. Lupus is a form of autoimmune disease which attacks the body and causes an incredible amount of pain. It’s not pretty and complications from the disease can make life even more unbearable for people. There is no cure and sadly there are few treatments outside of managing the pain and side effects of the disease. Thankfully medical researchers have used DNA sequencing........ Read more »

Julia I Ellyard, Rebekka Jerjen, Jaime L Martin, Adrian Lee, Matthew A Field, Simon H Jiang, Jean Cappello, Svenja K Naumann, T Daniel Andrews, Hamish S Scott.... (2014) Whole exome sequencing in early-onset cerebral SLE identifies a pathogenic variant in TREX1. Arthritis . info:/10.1002/art.38824

  • August 20, 2014
  • 11:23 AM
  • 115 views

What is Competence and Why Should I Care?

by Winston Sieck in Head Smart

If you’ve been reading about any of the new adventures in education, such as project-based learning, you’ve surely noticed the word competence sprinkled throughout. You may have thought, “Why do I keep hearing about competence? It sounds like another fad in my kid’s education. Wish they’d focus on getting test scores up.” In fact, competence […]... Read more »

McClelland, D. C. (1973) Testing for competence rather than for "intelligence.". American psychologist, 28(1), 1-14. info:/

  • August 20, 2014
  • 10:07 AM
  • 133 views

How Humans Are Helping Ravens and Hurting Hawks

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish

You’ve already picked a side in the bird wars, whether or not you know it. As humans carve up formerly empty expanses of the western United States with our roads, electrical towers, and power lines, we’re inadvertently giving a boost to ravens. Meanwhile, the birds of prey that once ruled the land are being left […]The post How Humans Are Helping Ravens and Hurting Hawks appeared first on Inkfish.... Read more »

  • August 20, 2014
  • 09:38 AM
  • 111 views

Video Tip of the Week: Immune Epitope DB (IEDB)

by Mary in OpenHelix

This week’s tip was inspired by the recent NHGRI workshop of the future directions for funding and resourcing of genomics-related projects. Titled “Future Opportunities for Genome Sequencing and Beyond: A Planning Workshop for the National Human Genome Research Institute” brought together a lot of influential folks on this topic, and had them noodle on the […]... Read more »

Vita R., J. A. Greenbaum, H. Emami, I. Hoof, N. Salimi, R. Damle, A. Sette, & B. Peters. (2010) The Immune Epitope Database 2.0. Nucleic Acids Research, 38(Database). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/nar/gkp1004  

Kim Y., Z. Zhu, D. Tamang, P. Wang, J. Greenbaum, C. Lundegaard, A. Sette, O. Lund, P. E. Bourne, & M. Nielsen. (2012) Immune epitope database analysis resource. Nucleic Acids Research, 40(W1). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/nar/gks438  

Bhattacharya Sanchita, Linda Gomes, Patrick Dunn, Henry Schaefer, Joan Pontius, Patty Berger, Vince Desborough, Tom Smith, John Campbell, & Elizabeth Thomson. (2014) ImmPort: disseminating data to the public for the future of immunology. Immunologic Research, 58(2-3), 234-239. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12026-014-8516-1  

  • August 20, 2014
  • 09:35 AM
  • 127 views

I hate you Charley, and the horse you rode in on

by Bill Sullivan in The 'Scope

The Charley Horse - why do we get these leg cramps and how can we prevent them? And why are they called a Charley Horse?!... Read more »

Garrison SR, Allan GM, Sekhon RK, Musini VM, & Khan KM. (2012) Magnesium for skeletal muscle cramps. The Cochrane database of systematic reviews. PMID: 22972143  

El-Tawil S, Al Musa T, Valli H, Lunn MP, El-Tawil T, & Weber M. (2010) Quinine for muscle cramps. The Cochrane database of systematic reviews. PMID: 21154358  

Miller KC, Mack GW, Knight KL, Hopkins JT, Draper DO, Fields PJ, & Hunter I. (2010) Three percent hypohydration does not affect threshold frequency of electrically induced cramps. Medicine and science in sports and exercise, 42(11), 2056-63. PMID: 20351595  

  • August 20, 2014
  • 09:30 AM
  • 142 views

State Fairs and Stiff Beers: Why We Can't Stop Drinking

by Aarti Chawla in The 'Scope

A look into why we drink and what alcohol does to the brain.... Read more »

Diamond I, & Messing RO. (1994) Neurologic effects of alcoholism. The Western journal of medicine, 161(3), 279-87. PMID: 7975567  

Paul CA, Au R, Fredman L, Massaro JM, Seshadri S, Decarli C, & Wolf PA. (2008) Association of alcohol consumption with brain volume in the Framingham study. Archives of neurology, 65(10), 1363-7. PMID: 18852353  

  • August 20, 2014
  • 08:00 AM
  • 113 views

Because He Is The One

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

Swatting a fly is hard. They always seem to know you’re coming, and even if you do surprise them, they often avoid your assassination attempts. New research is showing how they do it. A 2014 paper indicates that animals with faster metabolic rates actually process information and react quicker than larger animals. This, along with recent data showing how flies can jump away from a visual stimulus before taking flight and how they can coordinate a 0.03 second banking turn with incoming visu........ Read more »

Muijres FT, Elzinga MJ, Melis JM, & Dickinson MH. (2014) Flies evade looming targets by executing rapid visually directed banked turns. Science (New York, N.Y.), 344(6180), 172-7. PMID: 24723606  

Jumpertz R, Hanson RL, Sievers ML, Bennett PH, Nelson RG, & Krakoff J. (2011) Higher energy expenditure in humans predicts natural mortality. The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism, 96(6). PMID: 21450984  

  • August 20, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 100 views

Be still my heart: A short (one-item!) measure of narcissism? 

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

We are all about short measures of psychological constructs. You might say watching the development of various scales is a hobby here (just look at all these posts!). With rare exception, courts don’t permit lengthy questionnaires, or questions that sound like a psychological screening test. So when the Neuroskeptic blogged about a new one-item scale […]

Related posts:
The GASP scale: A new measure of guilt and shame proneness
Measuring beliefs in the paranormal: The Australian Sheep G........ Read more »

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