Post List

  • August 8, 2014
  • 10:27 AM
  • 112 views

It Only Takes Six Generations to Turn a Brown Butterfly Purple

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish

Evolution can seem like a slow way to get things done. It took more than a billion years for Earth’s life forms to try having more than one cell. In the famous March of Progress illustration showing an ape becoming an upright human, you can almost hear the stoop-shouldered cave guy in the middle groaning, “Hurry […]The post It Only Takes Six Generations to Turn a Brown Butterfly Purple appeared first on Inkfish.... Read more »

Wasik, B., Liew, S., Lilien, D., Dinwiddie, A., Noh, H., Cao, H., & Monteiro, A. (2014) Artificial selection for structural color on butterfly wings and comparison with natural evolution. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1402770111  

  • August 8, 2014
  • 09:52 AM
  • 123 views

Know your brain: Corpus callosum

by neurosci in Neuroscientifically Challenged







Corpus callosum (in red).CC image courtesy of Life Science Databases(LSDB).






Where is it?The corpus callosum is a large, C-shaped nerve fiber bundle found beneath the cerebral cortex. It stretches across the midline of the brain, connecting the left and right cerebral hemispheres. It makes up the largest collection of white matter tissue found in the brain.What is it and what does it do?To understand the role of the corpus callosum, it is first importan........ Read more »

  • August 8, 2014
  • 09:13 AM
  • 51 views

Translational Findings: How fruit fly research has already contributed to human health

by Bethany Christmann in Fly on the Wall

How have fruit flies already contributed to human health? I review four landmark fly papers that won their authors Nobel Prizes in Physiology or Medicine. ... Read more »

  • August 8, 2014
  • 08:40 AM
  • 105 views

The Friday Five for 8/8/2014

by Bill Sullivan in The 'Scope

Five of the best science news stories this week - mostly about junk food and junk DNA!... Read more »

  • August 8, 2014
  • 08:01 AM
  • 117 views

Researchers Uncover Stem Cell Behaviour of Human Bowel

by beredim in Stem Cells Freak

For the first time, researchers say they have uncovered new information on how stem cells in the human bowel behave, revealing vital clues about the earliest stages in bowel cancer development and how we may begin to prevent it.The research, led by Queen May University of London (QMUL) and published yesterday the journal Cell Reports, discovered how many stem cells exist within the human bowel and how they behave and evolve over time.Read More... Read more »

Quantification of Crypt and Stem Cell Evolution in the Normal and Neoplastic Human Colon. (2014) Ann-Marie Baker, Biancastella Cereser, Samuel Melton, Alexander G. Fletcher, Manuel Rodriguez-Justo, Paul J. Tadrous, Adam Humphries, George Elia, Stuart A.C. McDonald, Nicholas A. Wright, Benjamin D. Simons, Marnix Jansen, Trevor A. Graham. Cell Reports. info:/10.1016/j.celrep.2014.07.019

  • August 8, 2014
  • 07:27 AM
  • 132 views

Silica Glass Keeps Solar Cells Cool

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

A team of scientists led by Shanhui Fan, an electrical engineering professor at Stanford University, has used a specially patterned layer of silica glass to keep solar cells cool by shepherding away unwanted thermal radiation.... Read more »

Zhu, L., Raman, A., Wang, K., Anoma, M., & Fan, S. (2014) Radiative cooling of solar cells. Optica, 1(1), 32. DOI: 10.1364/OPTICA.1.000032  

  • August 8, 2014
  • 07:26 AM
  • 105 views

Prototype Meter Tests Accuracy of Hydrogen Fuel Dispensers

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

Scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed a prototype field test standard to test the accuracy of hydrogen fuel dispensers.... Read more »

  • August 8, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 111 views

Do you believe there are Angels and Demons among us?

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

The American Bar Association is seeking nominations until August 8, 2014 [THAT's TODAY!] to help it decide on the Top 100 law blogs (“Blawgs”). We have been in the ABA Top 100 for the past 4 years and would like to make it 5! If you like this blog, please nominate us (it’s fast and free) […]

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Keep your eye on this one: A Depravity Scale
The Islamophobia Scale: Measuring our fear of Muslims
Cathedrals, civic buildings and your tolerance for ambiguity


... Read more »

  • August 8, 2014
  • 06:50 AM
  • 59 views

How do you prove that reading boosts IQ?

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

A recent study on whether reading boosts intelligence attracted global media attention: "Reading at a young age makes you smarter," announced the Daily Mail. "Early reading boosts health and intelligence," said The Australian.In the race for eye-catching headlines, this mainstream media coverage arguably missed the more fascinating story of the hunt for cause and effect. Here lead author Dr Stuart Ritchie explains the science:"Causality, it turns out, is really difficult to prove. Correlational ........ Read more »

  • August 8, 2014
  • 05:54 AM
  • 75 views

Doctors should consider germline genetic testing in kidney cancer patients under 46

by Lizzie Perdeaux in BHD Research Blog

It is estimated that between 5 and 8% of kidney cancers are hereditary (Linehan et al., 2010). There are several clues that help clinicians diagnose these cases: patients who present with multifocal and/or bilateral tumours; who have a family history … Continue reading →... Read more »

Shuch B, Vourganti S, Ricketts CJ, Middleton L, Peterson J, Merino MJ, Metwalli AR, Srinivasan R, & Linehan WM. (2014) Defining early-onset kidney cancer: implications for germline and somatic mutation testing and clinical management. Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, 32(5), 431-7. PMID: 24378414  

  • August 7, 2014
  • 08:00 PM
  • 148 views

Do Narcissists Know They’re Narcissists?

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

According to a provocative paper just published, it’s possible to accurately determine how narcissistic someone is by asking them just one thing. Here’s the question in full: To what extent do you agree with this statement: I am a narcissist? (Note: The word ‘narcissist’ means egotistical, self-focused, and vain.) Answer on a scale from 1 […]The post Do Narcissists Know They’re Narcissists? appeared first on Neuroskeptic.... Read more »

  • August 7, 2014
  • 06:16 PM
  • 75 views

In it together: Couples' life satisfaction takes a bigger hit when one partner loses their job, than when both do

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

If your partner were to lose their job, you might think keeping your own employment would cushion the psychological blow. In fact new research finds that life satisfaction is higher for couples who share their unemployed predicament, than for couples where only one partner loses their job.Maike Luhmann and her colleagues analysed over ten years of longitudinal data from 3000 co-habiting couples in Germany, where one or both partners had gone through an unemployment. If one partner lost their job........ Read more »

  • August 7, 2014
  • 02:11 PM
  • 210 views

Nerve Regeneration: Another Piece of the Stem Cell Puzzle

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Almost everyone regenerates nerves, but you! Sure, yesterday we talked about how other animals in the kingdom regenerate damaged nerves and how we got left in the dust. But we […]... Read more »

  • August 7, 2014
  • 01:06 PM
  • 119 views

Researchers Grow Human Gastrointestinal Cells Using Epithelial Stem Cells

by beredim in Stem Cells Freak

Kelli L. VanDussen, PhD, and Matthew A. CiorbaA method of growing human cells from tissue removed from a patient's gastrointestinal (GI) tract may one day help scientists develop tailor-made therapies for inflammatory bowel disease and other GI-related conditions.Reporting online recently in the journal Gut, researchers from the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis said they have made cell lines from individual patients in as little as two weeks.They have created more than 6........ Read more »

  • August 7, 2014
  • 12:53 PM
  • 125 views

Harvard Researchers Identify New Potential Treatment for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

by beredim in Stem Cells Freak

This image depicts graduate student Sophie De Boer, (left), and Prof. Kevin Eggan (right) discussing their latest work.Credit: B. D. Colen/Harvard UniversityAbout eight years ago, researchers at the Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI) begun a series of studies that led to a report published today which may be a major step forward in thequest to developing real treatments for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).The findings by Harvard professor of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology (HSCRB) Kevin E........ Read more »

de Boer, A., Koszka, K., Kiskinis, E., Suzuki, N., Davis-Dusenbery, B., & Eggan, K. (2014) Genetic validation of a therapeutic target in a mouse model of ALS. Science Translational Medicine, 6(248), 248-248. DOI: 10.1126/scitranslmed.3009351  

  • August 7, 2014
  • 09:32 AM
  • 139 views

August 7, 2014

by Erin Campbell in HighMag Blog

No matter how many brilliant discoveries are made by countless brilliant scientists, there will always be a lot of unknowns out there. These unknowns are what keep our mental wheels turning, our imaginations running, and our labs busy. Today’s image is from a paper that describes a newly-discovered process of vascular development called “canalogenesis.” Schlemm’s canal (SC) is a flattened tube that encircles the anterior portion of the eye and drains fluid from the area. Abnormal drainag........ Read more »

  • August 7, 2014
  • 08:00 AM
  • 124 views

Thinking Makes My Head Hot

by Mark E. Lasbury in The 'Scope

The new movie, Lucy, contends that we only use 10% of our brain. Interesting, and true if you interpret the statement in one particular way. The interesting thought experiment is a contemplation of what would happen to us if we did only use 10% of our brain and then learned to use 100%. We would probably starve and die of fever. Research studies show that increased mental activity can lead to increased brain temperature, so should we should be picking kids for the gifted/talented program by temp........ Read more »

Mrozek, S., Vardon, F., & Geeraerts, T. (2012) Brain Temperature: Physiology and Pathophysiology after Brain Injury. Anesthesiology Research and Practice, 1-13. DOI: 10.1155/2012/989487  

  • August 7, 2014
  • 06:58 AM
  • 113 views

http://dailyfusion.net/2014/07/wind-turbines-feeding-opportunities-30753/

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

Scientists at the University of St Andrews have discovered that offshore pipelines and wind turbines can provide new feeding opportunities for the wildlife population in the area.... Read more »

Russell, D., Brasseur, S., Thompson, D., Hastie, G., Janik, V., Aarts, G., McClintock, B., Matthiopoulos, J., Moss, S., & McConnell, B. (2014) Marine mammals trace anthropogenic structures at sea. Current Biology, 24(14). DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2014.06.033  

  • August 7, 2014
  • 05:50 AM
  • 114 views

Nature’s Magnifying Glass: Gravitational Lensing

by RAZ Rebecca A. Zarate in United Academics

Gravitational lensing is a clean probe of the Universe and has much to tell us about its two most mysterious components – dark matter and dark energy. This article explains what it is, what is can discover and what Sherlock Holmes has to do with it.... Read more »

Kenneth C. Wong, Kim-Vy H. Tran, Sherry H. Suyu, Ivelina G. Momcheva, Gabriel B. Brammer, Mark Brodwin, Anthony H. Gonzalez, Aleksi Halkola, Glenn G. Kacprzak, Anton M. Koekemoer.... (2014) Discovery of a Strong Lensing Galaxy Embedded in a Cluster at z . The Astrophysical Journal Letters vol. 789 . arXiv: 1405.3661v2

  • August 7, 2014
  • 03:42 AM
  • 114 views

Vitamin D and schizophrenia meta-analysed

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

It's been a few weeks since I last talked about vitamin D on this blog and some finding or other talking about a deficiency of the stuff. Indeed, the last occasion was the publication of the Eva Kočovská study (see here) talking about issues with vitamin D being present across quite a few people on the autism spectrum, continuing a research trend (see here).So as to remedy this vitamin D blogging deficiency, today I'm talking about the systematic review and meta-analysis by Ghazaleh ........ Read more »

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