Post List

  • March 22, 2016
  • 03:40 PM
  • 212 views

Parsley, prohibition, and machine gun oil: A sorrowful history of tricresyl phosphate poisoning

by Rosin Cerate in Rosin Cerate

Some poisons are better known than others.Arsenic, for example, is famous for its participation in many a murder and suicide from the Middle Ages through to the mid-19th century (after which it became easier to detect and more difficult to acquire). Even to this day, the malicious metalloid remains in the public eye as a contaminant of groundwater in parts of South Asia and of soil in old orchards.A decidedly more obscure poison is a gooey industrial derivative of coal tar (leftovers from conver........ Read more »

  • March 22, 2016
  • 03:23 PM
  • 168 views

On the dangers of SciHub and hybrid journals

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

Changes and developments in the way things are done are sometimes seen as threatening, as dangers. That is a natural, instinctive reaction, perhaps, but sometimes, the danger lies not so much in the development itself as in the things that the development in question prevents. There are two developments in science publishing and science communication that are seen as dangerous by many. Both developments are seen as threatening from opposite sides of the fence, so to speak. … Read More U........ Read more »

  • March 22, 2016
  • 01:13 PM
  • 151 views

White's Tree Frog

by Jason Organ in Eatlemania!

The Eatles have been busy munching away for the first time on a non-mammal vertebrate! Specifically, they are devouring the soft tissue remains of a White's Tree Frog (Litoria caerulea) from Grant's Farm in St. Louis, MO, named Nona.White's Tree Frog. Photo from Animal Diversity Web.Also known as the Smiling Frog, and the Dumpy Frog, this animal is fascinating. It belongs to the Hylidae family of frogs, which is an interesting group because it is united by a single morhpological character shared........ Read more »

  • March 22, 2016
  • 12:19 PM
  • 210 views

People with schizophrenia-like traits can tickle themselves (whereas most people can't)

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

Go ahead, try tickling yourself on your inner forearm or neck. If you're like most people, you'll find it  doesn't work. The sensation would make you shiver or giggle with ticklishness if someone else did it, but when you do it yourself, it no longer has any tickle power.The inability of most people to tickle themselves has been documented by psychologists for a while, and it's thought be due to the fact that the brain creates predictions of the sensory consequences of our own actions, and ........ Read more »

  • March 22, 2016
  • 03:23 AM
  • 191 views

Can mitochondrial disease be mistaken for chronic fatigue syndrome?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Very possibly, is the answer to the question that titles this post on how the diagnostic borders between mitochondrial disease and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) might be blurred. I bring to your attention the case report published by Fernando Galán and colleagues [1] (open-access available here) as an example.Detailing the experiences of a 30-year old male who "appeared to meet the CDC-1994/Fukuda criteria for CFS [chronic fatigue syndrome]" and for whom 1 year of "cognitive behavioral th........ Read more »

Galán F, de Lavera I, Cotán D, & Sánchez-Alcázar JA. (2015) Mitochondrial Myopathy in Follow-up of a Patient With Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. Journal of investigative medicine high impact case reports, 3(3), 2147483647. PMID: 26904705  

  • March 21, 2016
  • 09:20 PM
  • 123 views

The genomes of 20 species of Leptospira

by Microbe Fan in Spirochetes Unwound

A massive study describing the genomes of 20 species of Leptospira was published a few weeks ago in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.  The deluge of sequence information will be valuable to those in the leptospirosis field.  Scientists will be able to examine differences in genetic content between various categories of Leptospira species to generate hypotheses for experimental testing.  For example, genes present in species that cause infections but missing in species that don't m........ Read more »

Fouts DE, Matthias MA, Adhikarla H, Adler B, Amorim-Santos L, Berg DE, Bulach D, Buschiazzo A, Chang YF, Galloway RL.... (2016) What makes a bacterial species pathogenic?: Comparative genomic analysis of the genus Leptospira. PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases, 10(2). PMID: 26890609  

  • March 21, 2016
  • 04:46 PM
  • 220 views

Sleep suppresses brain rebalancing

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Why humans and other animals sleep is one of the remaining deep mysteries of physiology. One prominent theory in neuroscience is that sleep is when the brain replays memories "offline" to better encode them ("memory consolidation"). A prominent and competing theory is that sleep is important for rebalancing activity in brain networks that have been perturbed during learning while awake.

... Read more »

  • March 21, 2016
  • 07:02 AM
  • 153 views

Does race make a difference in how jurors perceive  battered spouse syndrome cases?

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

In a word, yes. But perhaps not in the way you might think. Researchers were interested in seeing if the race of parties involved in battered spouse syndrome case defenses would make a difference in how jurors made decisions about verdicts. The researchers say their study is a contribution to the “scarce literature on the […]

Related posts:
Playing the race card: When it works and why it doesn’t
Is it possible that jurors will be misled by emotional  testimony and gruesome photos? ........ Read more »

  • March 21, 2016
  • 05:27 AM
  • 153 views

Inside the mind of an ultra-runner – the tougher it gets, the more fun it is

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

According to UltraRunning Magazine, an ultra run is anything longer than a standard marathon of 26 miles, but it’s not unusual for people to participate in gruelling runs that take place in punishing environments over days or even weeks. For people who struggle to run to catch a bus, the idea of deliberately putting yourself through this kind of physical punishment, for fun, seems little short of crazy. Yet this is a sport that’s on the increase – the number of official events has doubled ........ Read more »

Johnson, U., Kenttä, G., Ivarsson, A., Alvmyren, I., & Karlsson, M. (2015) An ultra-runner's experience of physical and emotional challenges during a 10-week continental run. International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 14(1), 72-84. DOI: 10.1080/1612197X.2015.1035736  

  • March 21, 2016
  • 04:30 AM
  • 179 views

Scapular Rehabilitation: Inside Info to Help Choose the Right Exercises

by Katie Reuther in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Different humeral elevation exercises result in different levels of scapulothoracic muscle activity. Knowledge of muscle activity levels for different exercises could help clinicians optimize rehabilitation protocols.... Read more »

  • March 21, 2016
  • 03:47 AM
  • 214 views

Risk of premature death and autism: some reflections

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"People with autism 'die younger', warns charity" went the very stark BBC headline recently.Today I'd like to bring your attention to the recent report published by Autistica titled: 'Personal tragedies, public crisis' making the headlines, highlighting how people with autism face a considerably enhanced risk of early mortality compared with the general population [1] (see here for my take).Although making quite sober reading and rightly using some very emotive language, I think m........ Read more »

Hirvikoski T, Mittendorfer-Rutz E, Boman M, Larsson H, Lichtenstein P, & Bölte S. (2016) Premature mortality in autism spectrum disorder. The British journal of psychiatry : the journal of mental science, 208(3), 232-8. PMID: 26541693  

  • March 20, 2016
  • 04:32 PM
  • 246 views

A link between nightmares and suicidal behavior

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

A new study is the first to report that the relationship between nightmares and suicidal behaviors is partially mediated by a multi-step pathway via defeat, entrapment, and hopelessness. Results show that suicidal thoughts, plans or attempts were present in 62 percent of participants who experienced nightmares and only 20 percent of those without nightmares.

... Read more »

  • March 20, 2016
  • 04:28 PM
  • 203 views

A European City With 50 Million People

by Paco Jariego in Mind the Post

Many properties of cities are quantitatively predictable due to agglomeration or scaling effects. What do these general relations predict for European cities?... Read more »

Bettencourt, L., & Lobo, J. (2016) Urban scaling in Europe. Journal of The Royal Society Interface, 13(116), 20160005. DOI: 10.1098/rsif.2016.0005  

  • March 20, 2016
  • 09:39 AM
  • 220 views

Neuropsychiatric Outcomes Of Traumatic Brain Injury

by Vivek Misra in Uberbrain Research Frontier

Traumatic brain injury (TBI), also known as intracranial injury, is a substantial head injury that results in damage to the brain. This damage can cause a wide spectrum of possible health outcomes. Factors that are likely to influence neuropsychiatric outcome in TBI can be classified as pre-injury, injury and post-injury factors. Injury-related factors include a) the type of physical injury
Read More
The post Neuropsychiatric Outcomes Of Traumatic Brain Injury appeared first on UBRF: UberBrain R........ Read more »

  • March 20, 2016
  • 08:06 AM
  • 263 views

A Detached Sense of Self Associated with Altered Neural Responses to Mirror Touch

by The Neurocritic in The Neurocritic

Our bodily sense of self contributes to our personal feelings of awareness as a conscious being. How we see our bodies and move through space and feel touched by loved ones are integral parts of our identity. What happens when this sense of self breaks down? One form of dissolution is Depersonalization Disorder (DPD).1 Individuals with DPD feel estranged or disconnected from themselves, as if their bodies belong to someone else, and “they” are merely a detached observer. Or the self feel........ Read more »

  • March 19, 2016
  • 11:36 PM
  • 240 views

The amygdala: Beyond fear

by neurosci in Neuroscientifically Challenged







THE AMYGDALA SHOWN ALONG WITH OTHER LIMBIC SYSTEM STRUCTURES.






The amygdala---or, more appropriately, amygdalae, as there is one in each cerebral hemisphere---was not recognized as a distinct brain region until the 1800s, and it wasn't until the middle of the twentieth century that it began to be considered an especially significant area in mediating emotional responses. Specifics about the role of the amygdala in emotion remained somewhat unclear, however, ........ Read more »

LeDoux, Joseph. (2007) The Amygdala. Current Biology. info:/

  • March 19, 2016
  • 03:01 PM
  • 187 views

Forgetting, to learn

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

They say that once you’ve learned to ride a bicycle, you never forget how to do it. Unfortunately for students who hope this applies to studying, they might not like new research suggesting that while learning, the brain is actively trying to forget. While this may at first blush seem like a bad thing, it actually may be useful for those suffering from PTSD.

... Read more »

Madroñal, N., Delgado-García, J., Fernández-Guizán, A., Chatterjee, J., Köhn, M., Mattucci, C., Jain, A., Tsetsenis, T., Illarionova, A., Grinevich, V.... (2016) Rapid erasure of hippocampal memory following inhibition of dentate gyrus granule cells. Nature Communications, 10923. DOI: 10.1038/ncomms10923  

  • March 19, 2016
  • 07:56 AM
  • 186 views

Is Replicability in Economics better than in Psychology?

by Richard Kunert in Brain's Idea

Colin Camerer and colleagues recently published a Science article on the replicability of behavioural economics. ‘It appears that there is some difference in replication success’ between psychology and economics, they write, given their reproducibility rate of 61% and psychology’s of 36%. I took a closer look at the data to find out whether there really […]... Read more »

Camerer, C., Dreber, A., Forsell, E., Ho, T., Huber, J., Johannesson, M., Kirchler, M., Almenberg, J., Altmejd, A., Chan, T.... (2016) Evaluating replicability of laboratory experiments in economics. Science. DOI: 10.1126/science.aaf0918  

  • March 19, 2016
  • 04:40 AM
  • 238 views

What can 'big data' tell us about suicide-related behaviours?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

The findings reported by Yu-Wen Lin and colleagues [1] (open-access available here) examining the "characteristics and suicide methods of patients with suicide-related behaviors" and "influential factors for repeated suicide-related behaviors and death by suicide" might not make for 'great dinner-party conversation' but are nevertheless important.Drawing on data from one of the world's premier 'big data' research sources - the Taiwanese National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) - ........ Read more »

  • March 18, 2016
  • 11:20 PM
  • 217 views

Supporting Instructional Analogies

by Joshua Fisher in Text Savvy

Hong Kong and Japanese teachers appear to be more attentive to the processing demands of relational comparisons than are U.S teachers. Their teaching reflects the use of strategies to reduce processing demands on their students. Such differences in adherence to sound cognitive principles may have a real impact on the likelihood that students benefit from analogies as instructional tools.... Read more »

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