Post List

  • January 31, 2011
  • 06:35 PM
  • 912 views

Splendid Splendiferousness and the “Scary Movie Effect”

by Kelsey in Mauka to Makai

Superman thought he was pretty freaking super and Mighty Mouse thought he was pretty freaking mighty. Therefore, splendid fairy-wrens must think they’re pretty freaking splendid.* And they probably do (especially when compared to their cousins, the less splendidly named lovely fairy-wren and superb fairy-wren). Alas, despite the splendiferous cockiness that their name suggests, male splendid [...]... Read more »

  • January 31, 2011
  • 06:30 PM
  • 1,161 views

Death of a hive, a science story

by Captain Skellett in A Schooner of Science

It was late afternoon, and Aethina could smell a hive in danger. Heavy with eggs she felt compelled to investigate. The scent wafted softly though the hot and hazy air, so faint it was barely discernible. Driven by survival, she flew as fast as she could. Weak as the smell was it was hard to [...]... Read more »

  • January 31, 2011
  • 03:54 PM
  • 1,185 views

How to be a neuroscientist

by Bradley Voytek in Oscillatory Thoughts

In this post, I will teach you all how to be proper, skeptical neuroscientists. By the end of this post, not only will you be able to spot "neuro nonsense" statements, but you'll also be able to spot nonsense neuroscience questions.I implore my journalist friends to take note of what I say in this post.Much has already been said on the topic of modern neuroimaging masquerading as "new phrenology". A lot of these arguments and conversations are hidden from the lay public, however, so I'm going to........ Read more »

Barres, B. (2010) Neuro Nonsense. PLoS Biology, 8(12). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.1001005  

Racine E, Bar-Ilan O, & Illes J. (2005) fMRI in the public eye. Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 6(2), 159-64. PMID: 15685221  

Editors. (2004) Brain scam?. Nature Neuroscience, 7(7), 683-683. DOI: 10.1038/nn0704-683  

Weisberg, D., Keil, F., Goodstein, J., Rawson, E., & Gray, J. (2008) The Seductive Allure of Neuroscience Explanations. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 20(3), 470-477. DOI: 10.1162/jocn.2008.20040  

Young, M., Hilgetag, C., & Scannell, J. (2000) On imputing function to structure from the behavioural effects of brain lesions. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 355(1393), 147-161. DOI: 10.1098/rstb.2000.0555  

  • January 31, 2011
  • 03:40 PM
  • 1,050 views

Iron-deficiency is not something you get just for being a lady

by Kate Clancy in Laboratory for Evolutionary Endocrinology

This post uses literature review, my own empirical research, and a new paper to demonstrate that menstrual cycling does not impact iron status in women. This goes against a major, prevailing medical notion and inhibits appropriate diagnosis in anemic women.... Read more »

  • January 31, 2011
  • 03:40 PM
  • 978 views

Iron-deficiency is not something you get just for being a lady

by Kate Clancy in Context & Variation

This post uses literature review, my own empirical research, and a new paper to demonstrate that menstrual cycling does not impact iron status in women. This goes against a major, prevailing medical notion and inhibits appropriate diagnosis in anemic women.... Read more »

  • January 31, 2011
  • 02:31 PM
  • 1,209 views

Too Many, Too Soon?

by Lindsay in Autist's Corner

Discusses Smith and Woods's (2010) re-analysis of Thompson et al.'s (2007) data on vaccine exposure in infancy and neuropsychological outcome in later childhood, with reference to the current popular idea that early-childhood vaccination schedules call for "too many, too soon."... Read more »

Thompson WW, Price C, Goodson B, Shay DK, Benson P, Hinrichsen VL, Lewis E, Eriksen E, Ray P, Marcy SM.... (2007) Early thimerosal exposure and neuropsychological outcomes at 7 to 10 years. The New England journal of medicine, 357(13), 1281-92. PMID: 17898097  

  • January 31, 2011
  • 02:15 PM
  • 620 views

Chronic back pain: Behavioural treatments sent to the naughty step?

by Lorimer Moseley in BodyInMind

We have written a fair amount here about back pain. We’ve criticised some of the information patients get, shown how data has undermined many widely held beliefs about back pain (here and here), and acknowledged the rather desperate state of the evidence in terms of treatment efficacy. It is becoming more popular to see back [...]... Read more »

Henschke N, Ostelo RWJG, van Tulder MW, Vlaeyen JWS, Morley S, Assendelft WJJ, Main CJ. (2010) Behavioural treatment for chronic low-back pain. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. info:/

  • January 31, 2011
  • 01:37 PM
  • 555 views

Don’t take the long road home

by PsychBusyBee in ionpsych

Do you take the fastest way home? Are you sure? Really?

I think I take the fastest route to work. I avoid traffic and stoplights, take long straight sections, and make right turns when ever possible. However, I always end up taking a completely different path home. I can't quite say why I do this, but both seem the quickest possible way to and from work. If one route wins the morning commute, why don't I follow the same path in reverse every evening? Continue reading →... Read more »

Sadalla, E., & Magel, S. (1980) The Perception of Traversed Distance. Environment and Behavior, 12(1), 65-79. DOI: 10.1177/0013916580121005  

  • January 31, 2011
  • 12:46 PM
  • 1,353 views

Occupational Therapy & the Cognitive Behavioural Approach For Pain Management – ii

by Bronwyn Thompson in Healthskills: Skills for Healthy Living

In the first post on my commentary of Robinson, Kennedy and Harmon’s review of occupational therapy for chronic pain, I argued that they have misinterpreted the cognitive behavioural approach to pain management, and in particular, that they appear to hold an outmoded view of pain as either biological/organic or psychological, and refute the place of … Read more... Read more »

  • January 31, 2011
  • 12:00 PM
  • 1,173 views

Hedging Your Bets

by Merry Youle in Small Things Considered

Bacteria that are born genetically equal aren't necessarily the same. The same genome, residing in cells side-by-side in the same medium in the same flask, does not guarantee the same phenotype. One example that comes to mind is the persisters in E. coli populations—the small number of cells that spontaneously stop growing. If the population is hit by a β-lactam antibiotic, those cells escape death. Similarly, under lab conditions that trigger genetic competence in B. subtilis, o........ Read more »

  • January 31, 2011
  • 12:00 PM
  • 1,085 views

Ending public-private partnerships between Big Food and Health

by Yoni Freedhoff in Weighty Matters

Sorry for the late post, the embargo lifted at noon.Today's edition of the Canadian Medical Association Journal contains an editorial the I co-authored with Paul Hebert. In it we argue that partnerships between food conglomerates and health organizations should be avoided.The risk is straightforward. Partnerships by definition serve to benefit both parties. For the health organizations the benefits involve some combination of money, resources and exposure. For the food industry the benefits ........ Read more »

Yoni Freedhoff, & Paul Hebert. (2011) Partnerships between health organizations and the food industry risk derailing public health nutrition. CMAJ. info:/

  • January 31, 2011
  • 11:33 AM
  • 2,468 views

Cottonmouth Myths II: Cottonmouth Breeding Balls

by David Steen in Living Alongside Wildlife



Cottonmouths, Agkistrodon piscivorus, are so feared and misunderstood that perhaps the most terrifying thing the average citizen can imagine is these snakes in the process of making even more Cottonmouths.  I would guess it is a combination of fear, rural folklore, and maybe just the fact that Cottonmouth biology is not often brought up in school, but there is a lot of ... Read more »

Herrington, R.E. (1989) Reproductive biology of the brown water snake, Nerodia taxispilota, in central Georgia. Brimleyana, 103-110. info:/

  • January 31, 2011
  • 11:26 AM
  • 1,207 views

Teaching evolution

by David Basanta in Cancerevo: Cancer evolution

A few days ago I was talking with some friends and, one of them, a science teacher in a school in Florida told us about how he tried to teach his students about evolution and how he was told...... Read more »

  • January 31, 2011
  • 11:16 AM
  • 1,369 views

Do all cities have neighborhoods?

by Michael Smith in Wide Urban World

It's hard to imagine a modern city that does not have neighborhoods. What would residential areas in such a city look like? Is this even possible? Given the prominence of neighborhoods in social science research on life in cities today, I would guess that all modern cities do have neighborhoods. If a sociologist or planner, for example, identified a city that lacked neighborhoods, I'm sure they would study the situation and publicize it for being so strange.For premodern cities whose housing and........ Read more »

  • January 31, 2011
  • 11:16 AM
  • 1,529 views

Effects of Process Maturity and Uncertainty on SC Performance

by Daniel Dumke in SCRM Blog - Supply Chain Risk Management


Process orientation may or may not be a very hip topic right now. Nevertheless effective processes are a foundation for company performance. Lockamy, Childerhouse, Disney, Towill and McCormack (2008), analyze and explain the impact of process maturity and uncertainty on supply chain performance, the full paper can be obtained here free of charge.

In close collaboration with several businesses they conducted an empirical study on this topic, which I present in the following.

Business Proce........ Read more »

Lockamy, A., Childerhouse, P., Disney, S., Towill, D., & McCormack, K. (2008) The impact of process maturity and uncertainty on supply chain performance: an empirical study. International Journal of Manufacturing Technology and Management, 15(1), 12. DOI: 10.1504/IJMTM.2008.018237  

Christopher, M., & Peck, H. (2004) Building the Resilient Supply Chain. The International Journal of Logistics Management, 15(2), 1-14. DOI: 10.1108/09574090410700275  

  • January 31, 2011
  • 11:04 AM
  • 972 views

The Bank Account for Childhood Sleep

by Rob Mitchum in ScienceLife

It’s a fight all parents are familiar with: the nightly battle to get their children to bed. Kids will try almost any tactic to avoid being tucked in for the night, and even then have long found ways to delay sleep with under-the-cover flashlights. But the deficit of sleep for today’s children and the degree [...]... Read more »

  • January 31, 2011
  • 10:58 AM
  • 805 views

I Smell a Rat.. and it Smells Your Lung Infection

by Eva Gusnowski in Science in Seconds

Tuberculosis is a bastard. Approximately 1/3 of the human population is infected with the mycobacteria that causes tuberculosis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, with new infections thought to occur once every second.

However, many of the people that are infected do not show disease symptoms, resulting in a latent (asymptomatic) infection.... Read more »

Poling A, Weetjens BJ, Cox C, Mgode G, Jubitana M, Kazwala R, Mfinanga GS, & Huis In 't Veld D. (2010) Using giant African pouched rats to detect tuberculosis in human sputum samples: 2009 findings. The American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene, 83(6), 1308-10. PMID: 21118940  

  • January 31, 2011
  • 10:56 AM
  • 903 views

When ‘Us vs Them’ Becomes ‘Us and Them’

by APS Daily Observations in Daily Observations

Being treated differently because you’re a foreigner doesn’t have to be a bad thing. Research published in Psychological Science found that in just and fair organizations,  local employees were more ... Read more »

  • January 31, 2011
  • 10:54 AM
  • 1,114 views

How many leucines?

by Richard Grant in Faculty of 1000

Removal of neurotransmitter from the synaptic cleft is accomplished by a class of transporter called Neurotransmitter/sodium symporters (NSSs). These couple the uptake of neurotransmitter (including dopamine, GABA, serotonin, noradrenaline) with sodium ions. They’re the target of pharmaceutical interventions, particularly antidepressants … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • January 31, 2011
  • 10:54 AM
  • 939 views

How many leucines?

by Richard Grant in Naturally Selected

Removal of neurotransmitter from the synaptic cleft is accomplished by a class of transporter called Neurotransmitter/sodium symporters (NSSs). These couple the uptake of neurotransmitter (including dopamine, GABA, serotonin, noradrenaline) with sodium ions. They’re the target of pharmaceutical interventions, particularly antidepressants … Continue reading →... Read more »

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