Post List

  • June 8, 2011
  • 01:30 PM
  • 1,234 views

Know thy threat

by CJA Bradshaw in ConservationBytes

Here’s another great guest post by Megan Evans of UQ – her previous post on resolving the environmentalist’s paradox was a real hit, so I hope you enjoy this one too. – The reasons for the decline of Australia’s unique biodiversity are many, and most are well known. Clearing of vegetation for urban and agricultural [...]... Read more »

Megan C. Evans, James E. M. Watson, Richard A. Fuller, Oscar Venter, Simon C. Bennett, Peter R. Marsack, & Hugh P. Possingham. (2011) The spatial distribution of threats to species in Australia. BioScience, 61(4), 281-289. info:/10.1525/bio.2011.61.4.8

  • June 8, 2011
  • 01:30 PM
  • 1,067 views

Know thy threat

by CJA Bradshaw in ConservationBytes

Here’s another great guest post by Megan Evans of UQ – her previous post on resolving the environmentalist’s paradox was a real hit, so I hope you enjoy this one too. – The reasons for the decline of Australia’s unique biodiversity are many, and most are well known. Clearing of vegetation for urban and agricultural [...]... Read more »

Megan C. Evans, James E. M. Watson, Richard A. Fuller, Oscar Venter, Simon C. Bennett, Peter R. Marsack, & Hugh P. Possingham. (2011) The spatial distribution of threats to species in Australia. BioScience, 61(4), 281-289. info:/10.1525/bio.2011.61.4.8

  • June 8, 2011
  • 01:30 PM
  • 1,102 views

Know thy threat

by CJA Bradshaw in ConservationBytes

Here’s another great guest post by Megan Evans of UQ – her previous post on resolving the environmentalist’s paradox was a real hit, so I hope you enjoy this one too. – The reasons for the decline of Australia’s unique biodiversity are many, and most are well known. Clearing of vegetation for urban and agricultural [...]... Read more »

Megan C. Evans, James E. M. Watson, Richard A. Fuller, Oscar Venter, Simon C. Bennett, Peter R. Marsack, & Hugh P. Possingham. (2011) The spatial distribution of threats to species in Australia. BioScience, 61(4), 281-289. info:/10.1525/bio.2011.61.4.8

  • June 8, 2011
  • 12:09 PM
  • 1,386 views

One Sided De-Novo Computational Design of a Protein-Protein Interaction

by Nir London in Macromolecular Modeling Blog

In a recent Science paper, Sarel Fleishman et al. report the de-novo computational design of a protein interface to specifically target and tightly bind a surface patch of the flu hemaglutinin protein. We interview Sarel to get the insights from behind the scenes and the outlook for this exciting approach.



... Read more »

Fleishman SJ, Whitehead TA, Ekiert DC, Dreyfus C, Corn JE, Strauch EM, Wilson IA, & Baker D. (2011) Computational design of proteins targeting the conserved stem region of influenza hemagglutinin. Science (New York, N.Y.), 332(6031), 816-21. PMID: 21566186  

  • June 8, 2011
  • 12:00 PM
  • 1,564 views

What would you pay for digital goods?

by David Bradley in Sciencetext

The advent of digital information goods, whether in ebook or PDF form, existing as a downloadable packet of bits wrapped up in an mp3 file or streamed as an avi movie, has changed our perception of value. Take that mp3…it represents an intangible entity often a free, but illicit download, often of low quality. How [...]Post from: David Bradley's Sciencetext Tech TalkWhat would you pay for digital goods?
... Read more »

Jerald Hughes. (2011) The price of quality in digital information goods: an empirical investigation. Int. J. Services and Standards, 7(1), 35-49. info:/

  • June 8, 2011
  • 11:41 AM
  • 972 views

Fat Tea: like guiness but tea (Including a descant on fat types like coconut oil)

by mc in begin to dig (b2d)

There's an old saw about Guiness - it's the beer that drinks like a meal. That can certainly be true. But if one's passion is less for beer, and say, more towards tea, and let's also say we're keen to get our protein and fats in, and also want to enhance our satiety, and maybe improve our energy expenditure, i may have a drink for you. To the best of my knowledge, i think i've concocted this, and call it Fat Tea.

Fat Tea consists of 


The makings of Fat Tea: black tea, organic
whole milk........ Read more »

Butler G, Stergiadis S, Seal C, Eyre M, & Leifert C. (2011) Fat composition of organic and conventional retail milk in northeast England. Journal of dairy science, 94(1), 24-36. PMID: 21183013  

Ellis KA, Innocent G, Grove-White D, Cripps P, McLean WG, Howard CV, & Mihm M. (2006) Comparing the fatty acid composition of organic and conventional milk. Journal of dairy science, 89(6), 1938-50. PMID: 16702257  

Marie-Pierre St-Onge and Aubrey Bosarge. (2008) Weight-loss diet that includes consumption of medium-chain triacylglycerol oil leads to a greater rate of weight and fat mass loss than does olive oil. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 87(3), 621-626. info:other/NIHMS201761

  • June 8, 2011
  • 11:39 AM
  • 845 views

Don’t discriminate against handicapped spiders just because their webs look a little different…

by Dr. Carin Bondar in Dr. Carin Bondar - Biologist With a Twist

Handicapped spiders?
Yes indeed. Field observations of a variety of arachnid species in the wild reveal that up to 40% of adults are missing at least one appendage. Spiders, along with many other invertebrates and some vertebrates, can undergo a process called ‘autotomy’ – the reflexive capacity to lose a limb. The ability [...]... Read more »

  • June 8, 2011
  • 10:52 AM
  • 1,360 views

Blindsnake mimics, scaly-foots and javelin lizards (gekkotans part XI)

by Darren Naish in Tetrapod Zoology



I really want to get these pygopodid articles finished. Actually, I really want to get the whole gekkotan series finished: the end is in sight and I know I'll get there eventually. In the previous articles on pygopodids (part of the long-running series on gekkotan lizards: see links below), we looked at pygopodid diversity and biology in general, and also at the phylogeny and evolutionary history of these fascinating, snake-like gekkotans. This time round, we look in more detail at the various........ Read more »

Kluge, A. G. (1974) A taxonomic revision of the lizard family Pygopodidae. Miscellaneous Publications, Museum of Zoology, University of Michigan, 1-221. info:/

  • June 8, 2011
  • 10:34 AM
  • 1,091 views

Interested in doing a postdoc in music cognition?

by Henkjan Honing in Music Matters

Postdoc in Music Cognition Vacancy... Read more »

  • June 8, 2011
  • 09:42 AM
  • 688 views

Risk-based Classification of Supplier Relationships

by Daniel Dumke in SCRM Blog - Supply Chain Risk Management


A large proportion of the efforts in supply chain risk management focus on the supply side, even though, using common definitions of supply chain management, the supply chain of course not only contains the suppliers but also the customers down to the end-customer.
Focussing on the supply side, Hallikas et al. 2005 studied the different classes of supplier relationships and what risk mitigation strategies might be effective with these classes. This classification can help both affected par........ Read more »

Hallikas, J., Puumalainen, K., Vesterinen, T., & Virolainen, V. (2005) Risk-based classification of supplier relationships. Journal of Purchasing and Supply Management, 11(2-3), 72-82. DOI: 10.1016/j.pursup.2005.10.005  

  • June 8, 2011
  • 08:00 AM
  • 1,773 views

Health Care Market Equilibrium in a Changing Environment

by Shaheen Lakhan in Brain Blogger

Strategic market planning has always been a challenge in the rapidly changing health care industry. Both internal factors of unpredictability and external market threats create waves of instability in the health care market industry. For health care consumers, this often means fluctuating health care costs and unpredictable care availability. For health care providers, this means [...]... Read more »

  • June 8, 2011
  • 08:00 AM
  • 1,310 views

Amphibious invasion plans

by Zen Faulkes in NeuroDojo

I'm in Hawaii to speak at a symposium on invasive species. Invasive species have many characteristics that might tend to make them invasive. ALthough I don't expect it to come up, seeing how the symposium is on crustaceans, it's worth asking a question that recurs a lot here:

What about the brains?

Normally, we think of invaders as being able to turn out lots of babies, or having defenses that natives don't, or all sorts of other factors. But could invaders be winning because they are smarter?........ Read more »

Amiel JJ, Tingley R, & Shine R. (2011) Smart Moves: Effects of Relative Brain Size on Establishment Success of Invasive Amphibians and Reptiles. PLoS ONE, 6(4). info:/10.1371/journal.pone.0018277

  • June 8, 2011
  • 07:02 AM
  • 1,381 views

Foot in mouth? Rate of speech, verb choice, and calling women “guys”

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Everything you say is evidence for judgment.  But we are steadfast in our desire to help you keep track of how to say it and what not to say. So here are three new sources to help you watch your mouth. Rate of speech You know the stereotype of the ‘smooth talker’. We tend to [...]


Related posts:Okay, wait! Which one of you was I listening to?
Women are soft (and sweet) and men are hard (and tough)
Men prefer boxes and women prefer ellipses?
... Read more »

  • June 8, 2011
  • 05:30 AM
  • 384 views

MCA revisited [2]

by admin in U+003F

As a base example, we’ll use the model presented in [1], a 1986 paper describing METAMOD – modelling software for your BBC micro. How I’d love to have a play with METAMOD now. The model is called SEQFB, a branched pathway with sequential feedbacks. The program is used to find the model’s steady state for [...]... Read more »

  • June 8, 2011
  • 05:30 AM
  • 420 views

MCA revisited [2]

by admin in U+003F

As a base example, we’ll use the model presented in [1], a 1986 paper describing METAMOD – modelling software for your BBC micro. How I’d love to have a play with METAMOD now. The model is called SEQFB, a branched pathway with sequential feedbacks. The program is used to find the model’s steady state for [...]... Read more »

  • June 8, 2011
  • 05:08 AM
  • 1,749 views

From the Editor’s Desk: The Giant Squid Can Be A Panda For The Ocean

by Dr. M in Deep Sea News

How many of you see a panda and automatically think of conservation and the World Wildlife Fund?  The well-known panda logo was designed by the famous conservationist Sir Peter Scott. one of the founding members of WWF.  The idea originated from a panda named Chi Chi transferred into the London Zoo in the . . . → Read More: From the Editor’s Desk: The Giant Squid Can Be A Panda For The Ocean... Read more »

Ángel Guerraa, Ángel F. Gonzáleza, Santiago Pascuala, and Earl G. Daweb. (2011) The giant squid Architeuthis: An emblematic invertebrate that can represent concern for the conservation of marine biodiversity. Biological Conservation, 144(7), 1989-1998. info:/10.1016/j.biocon.2011.04.021

  • June 8, 2011
  • 04:47 AM
  • 1,758 views

More bad science in the service of the discredited idea that vaccines cause autism

by Orac in Respectful Insolence

More than a week has passed, and I thought that this cup had passed from me, and I was glad. After all, if I analyzed every crap study done by anti-vaccine zealots to try to demonstrate that vaccines cause autism, I would have time for little else in terms of other kinds of that Insolence you all know and love. This particular study was released in late May and, at the time, I wasn't really in the mood to take it on; so I ignored it. But then wouldn't you know that the Autism Action Network woul........ Read more »

  • June 8, 2011
  • 03:00 AM
  • 2,384 views

Better alternatives to tackle the road dangers of winter snow and ice?

by SAGE Insight in SAGE Insight

Plexiglas-roofed city highways/roadways can eliminate snow/ice/ rain-associated deaths, deicing salt-induced environmental damage, and hypertension-promoting salinization of water From Public Works Management & Policy Since the severe winter of 2009-2010, which brought snow and ice to 49 states of the US there have been great concerns for future safety, commerce, and mobility. Snowstorms and ice storms [...]... Read more »

Biji T. Kurien. (2011) Plexiglas-roofed city highways/roadways can eliminate snow/ice/ rain-associated deaths, deicing salt-induced environmental damage, and hypertension-promoting salinization of water. Public Works Management . info:/10.1177/1087724X11405064

  • June 8, 2011
  • 02:44 AM
  • 767 views

Nubia, irrigation and parasitic worms, a tale told by a Mummy

by Captain Skellett in A Schooner of Science

A few months ago I wrote about Ancient Nubians and their antibiotic beer, delivering a dose of tetracycline in every brew. Now bioarcheologist George Armelagos has co-authored a study showing that early irrigation channels changed how humans were affected by parasites. I’ll describe the research at the end, but first – a story! Make yourself [...]... Read more »

Hibbs AC, Secor WE, Van Gerven D, & Armelagos G. (2011) Irrigation and infection: The immunoepidemiology of schistosomiasis in ancient Nubia. American journal of physical anthropology, 145(2), 290-8. PMID: 21469072  

  • June 8, 2011
  • 02:44 AM
  • 708 views

Nubia, irrigation and parasitic worms, a tale told by a Mummy

by Captain Skellett in A Schooner of Science

A few months ago I wrote about Ancient Nubians and their antibiotic beer, delivering a dose of tetracycline in every brew. Now bioarcheologist George Armelagos has co-authored a study showing that early irrigation channels changed how humans were affected by parasites. I’ll describe the research at the end, but first – a story! Make yourself [...]... Read more »

Hibbs AC, Secor WE, Van Gerven D, & Armelagos G. (2011) Irrigation and infection: The immunoepidemiology of schistosomiasis in ancient Nubia. American journal of physical anthropology, 145(2), 290-8. PMID: 21469072  

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