Post List

  • July 8, 2010
  • 09:40 PM
  • 960 views

Sunscreen in a Pill?

by Scott in Science-Based Pharmacy

I’ve previously described the consequences of acute and chronic sun exposure, and the rationale for topical sunscreen products. But wouldn’t it be easier to just take a pill that can boost our skin’s resistance to to the harmful effects of the sun? Is it possible to get all the benefits of sunscreen without the bother [...]... Read more »

Middelkamp-Hup MA, Pathak MA, Parrado C, Goukassian D, Rius-Díaz F, Mihm MC, Fitzpatrick TB, & González S. (2004) Oral Polypodium leucotomos extract decreases ultraviolet-induced damage of human skin. Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, 51(6), 910-8. PMID: 15583582  

Middelkamp-Hup MA, Pathak MA, Parrado C, Garcia-Caballero T, Rius-Díaz F, Fitzpatrick TB, & González S. (2004) Orally administered Polypodium leucotomos extract decreases psoralen-UVA-induced phototoxicity, pigmentation, and damage of human skin. Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, 50(1), 41-9. PMID: 14699363  

  • July 8, 2010
  • 09:07 PM
  • 584 views

Organic agriculture pest control through enemy evenness

by Colby in nutsci.org

Recently I wrote about a study on organic vs synthetic pesticides on sustainability, which suggested that organic pesticides are not always more efficacious against pests nor as selective (not killing natural enemies of pests) than synthetic pesticides. Earlier this month a study was published … Continue reading →... Read more »

Crowder DW, Northfield TD, Strand MR, & Snyder WE. (2010) Organic agriculture promotes evenness and natural pest control. Nature, 466(7302), 109-12. PMID: 20596021  

  • July 8, 2010
  • 08:12 PM
  • 905 views

The neural basis of synesthesia

by NeuroKüz in NeuroKüz

Wikipedia has a page on the neural basis of synesthesia, but not yet described there is a new study in press by Vilayanur S. Ramachandran’s group that provides interesting insights.Synesthesia is a neurological condition in which affected individuals experience one sense (e.g. hearing) as another sense (e.g. visual colours). Ramachandran’s latest study investigated grapheme-colour synesthetes who experience specific colours when they view specific graphemes (i.e., letters and numbers). The r........ Read more »

  • July 8, 2010
  • 07:41 PM
  • 456 views

Neuroscientific Explanation for Why the US Tied Slovenia

by Allison in Dormivigilia

A recent article in PLos uncovered a directional bias, in that we react slower and misjudge events moving to the left vs right. This may be due to our absolute tendency to read left-to-right. ... Read more »

Kranjec A, Lehet M, Bromberger B, Chatterjee A. (2010) A Sinister Bias for Calling Fouls in Soccer. PLoS One, 5(7). info:/10.1371/journal.pone.0011667

  • July 8, 2010
  • 06:28 PM
  • 849 views

fMRI of Letter Processing in Children and Adults

by Livia in Reading and Word Recognition Research

Accessibility: Intermediate-Advanced



How is letter processing different from word processing? Since letters compose words, many reading models have letter processing earlier in the reading stream, but there is still room for more imaging...

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... Read more »

Turkeltaub PE, Flowers DL, Lyon LG, & Eden GF. (2008) Development of ventral stream representations for single letters. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 13-29. PMID: 19076386  

  • July 8, 2010
  • 06:04 PM
  • 765 views

compensating for risk when driving

by Daniel Simons in The Invisible Gorilla

Do drivers compensate for distraction? Sometimes, but not when it actually might help...... Read more »

  • July 8, 2010
  • 04:11 PM
  • 931 views

Brain Aging: Men and Women Do It Differently

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

Improved structural and functional brain imaging technologies provide assistance in understanding brain gender differences. A Japanese study of the effects of age and gender has been recently published in Human Brain Mapping. The study focussed on brain gray and white matter volumes in a variety of brain regions. Gray matter volumes declined with age in both genders. In the younger subjects, few differences were found between men and women in regional brain volumes. However, as the older age........ Read more »

  • July 8, 2010
  • 04:09 PM
  • 437 views

Losing Big

by Journal Watch Online in Journal Watch Online

The abundance of large mammals in Africa’s protected areas has dropped by more than half since 1970, scientists say.
The findings, reported in Biological Conservation, emerged from an analysis of 69 species in 78 protected areas. The team scoured studies, databases, and reports for data on mammal populations and calculated that abundance had decreased by […] Read More »... Read more »

  • July 8, 2010
  • 04:00 PM
  • 1,358 views

Time to brush up on your acting

by Lorimer Moseley in BodyInMind

We are lucky enough to have three rather clever and certainly friendly med students working on some research studies.  This post is from Rahul – it is about a paper we thought was interesting.  We wonder if there might be something in it for our quest for better treatments.  Here’s Rahul- After a nauseating movie-going [...]... Read more »

  • July 8, 2010
  • 03:35 PM
  • 515 views

Atlatls to Bows: A Suspiciously Large Arrow

by teofilo in Gambler's House

In comments to the previous post, pato’ links to a recent press release on the discovery of an atlatl dart in a melting ice patch near Yellowstone.  This type of discovery is becoming more common as global warming causes ice patches and glaciers to melt at an unprecedented rate, releasing artifacts that have been frozen [...]... Read more »

Keddie, G., & Nelson, E. (2005) An Arrow from the Tsitsutl Glacier, British Columbia. Canadian Journal of Archaeology, 113-123. info:/

  • July 8, 2010
  • 03:13 PM
  • 318 views

Confound it!

by PalMD in White Coat Underground

This article is going to be about sex. I promise. But first, some reflections.

Well, Pepsipocalypse continues. The Management pulled the ill-conceived PepsiCo nutrition blog, which is a Good Thing. This doesn't change my misgivings about what has happened. As many other bloggers have already stated, the Pepsi fiasco is a single, highly-public event, but there are non-public problems that are important to some bloggers, including me.

Removing the "advertorial" blog was the right thing fo........ Read more »

Anupam B. Jena, MD, PhD; Dana P. Goldman, PhD; Amee Kamdar, PhD; Darius N. Lakdawalla, PhD; and Yang Lu, PhD. (2010) Sexually Transmitted Diseases Among Users of Erectile Dysfunction Drugs: Analysis of Claims Data . Annals of Internal Medicine, 153(1), 1-7. info:/

  • July 8, 2010
  • 01:06 PM
  • 431 views

Motor learning changes where you think you are

by Carl in The motor chauvinist

I’ve covered both sensory and motor learning topics on this blog so far, and here’s one that very much mashes the two together. In earlier posts I have written about how we form a percept of the world around us, and about our sense of ownership of our limbs. In today’s paper the authors investigate the effect of learning a motor task on sensory perception itself.They performed a couple of experiments, in slightly different ways, which essentially showed the same result – so I’ll just t........ Read more »

Ostry DJ, Darainy M, Mattar AA, Wong J, & Gribble PL. (2010) Somatosensory plasticity and motor learning. The Journal of Neuroscience, 30(15), 5384-93. PMID: 20392960  

  • July 8, 2010
  • 12:51 PM
  • 326 views

Can You Hear Me Now?

by Journal Watch Online in Journal Watch Online

Endangered right whales in the Atlantic Ocean are turning up the volume of their calls as their environment becomes more cacophonous, according to a report in Biology Letters.
North Atlantic right whales (Eubalaena glacialis) call to each other at a frequency of about 50 to 400 Hz. Many of the animals live in an area […] Read More »... Read more »

  • July 8, 2010
  • 12:46 PM
  • 1,134 views

Squid Visual Ecology

by Mike Mike in Cephalove

Keeping with the theme of sensory systems, I thought I'd review some newer research on squids.While searching for recent cephalopod neurobehavioral research (which is pretty scant) to blog about, I came upon Makino and Miyazaki's study on the distribution of retinal cells in the retina of squids.  I have a soft spot for visual neuroscience that I picked up from working with my first research advisor, who works on the visual system of frogs.  In any case, this is a good paper (although ........ Read more »

Akihiko Makino, & Taeko Miyazaki. (2010) Topographical distribution of visual cell nuclei in the retina in relation to the habitat of five species of decapodiformes (Cephalopoda). Journal of Mulluscan Studies, 180-185. info:/10.1093/mollus/eyp055

  • July 8, 2010
  • 11:47 AM
  • 610 views

The wolves of Ethiopia

by DeLene Beeland in Wild Muse

When most people hear the word “wolf,” they think of the burly gray wolves of the Great White North. But wolves are present all over the world, even in Africa. The Ethiopian wolf, Canis simensisis incredibly endangered. As its name implies, it lives in Ethiopia, but it lives only in seven highland mountain ranges, above [...]... Read more »

  • July 8, 2010
  • 11:32 AM
  • 1,568 views

Put Down Your iPhone and Watch the Game: Notes on the Home Team Advantage

by Krystal D'Costa in Anthropology in Practice

Baseball is not golf. Yes, in both sports players attempt to hit a ball with a stick, but that's essentially where the similarities end. Baseball, unlike golf, thrives on the noisy participation of the fans. Golf asks spectators to "remain still and quiet during a player's shot [and] crowds are strongly discouraged from cheering until after a player hits the ball." Baseball will have none of

... Read more »

  • July 8, 2010
  • 10:56 AM
  • 1,718 views

Kids These Days: Is Our Learning Measure Valid?

by Chad Orzel in Uncertain Principles

Kevin Drum has done a couple of education-related posts recently, first noting a story claiming that college kids study less than they used to, and following that up with an anecdotal report on kids these days, from an email correspondent who teaches physics. Kevin's emailer writes of his recent experiences with two different groups of students:

Since the early 1990's, I have pre and post tested all of my introductory mechanics classes using a research based diagnostic instrument, the Force and........ Read more »

  • July 8, 2010
  • 10:05 AM
  • 570 views

Fossil Traces Show How Small Dinosaurs Sped Up

by Brian Switek in Dinosaur Tracking

Fossil dinosaur tracks don’t often get the same popular attention that skeletons do. The impressions within the rock seem to pale in comparison to the beautiful organic architecture of the bones, but, while they might not be as aesthetically interesting to some, tracks are bits of behavior preserved for millions of years. They were made [...]... Read more »

  • July 8, 2010
  • 09:15 AM
  • 1,567 views

Sunscreen in a Pill?

by Scott Gavura in Science-Based Medicine


I’ve previously described the consequences of acute and chronic sun exposure, and the rationale for topical sunscreen products. But wouldn’t it be easier to just take a pill that can boost our skin’s resistance to to the harmful effects of the sun? Is it possible to get all the benefits of sunscreen without the bother [...]... Read more »

Middelkamp-Hup MA, Pathak MA, Parrado C, Goukassian D, Rius-Díaz F, Mihm MC, Fitzpatrick TB, & González S. (2004) Oral Polypodium leucotomos extract decreases ultraviolet-induced damage of human skin. Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, 51(6), 910-8. PMID: 15583582  

Middelkamp-Hup MA, Pathak MA, Parrado C, Garcia-Caballero T, Rius-Díaz F, Fitzpatrick TB, & González S. (2004) Orally administered Polypodium leucotomos extract decreases psoralen-UVA-induced phototoxicity, pigmentation, and damage of human skin. Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, 50(1), 41-9. PMID: 14699363  

  • July 8, 2010
  • 08:22 AM
  • 839 views

For any plant DNA geeks out there

by Kent in Uncommon Ground

If you work on plants and you've extracted DNA from them in the last 20 years, chances are that you've used some version of the method described by Doyle and Doyle.1 According to Google Scholar, Doyle and Doyle has been...... Read more »

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