Post List

  • July 24, 2011
  • 09:48 PM
  • 830 views

Female Dolphins Sponge Their Way to Success

by Paul Norris in AnimalWise

After 27 years, scientists finally appear to have unraveled most of the mystery surrounding a very enterprising group of (primarily) female bottlenose dolphins (tursiops aduncus) who live in Shark Bay, off the coast of Western Australia. The story opens in … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • July 24, 2011
  • 03:15 PM
  • 1,500 views

Using the Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire

by Bronwyn Thompson in Healthskills: Skills for Healthy Living

Over the past few months I’ve been using the Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire (CPAQ-8) as part of a battery of questionnaires used at intake and outcome measures.  Along with the CPAQ-8, we use the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia, the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale, the Pain Anxiety Symptoms Scale, the Pain  Catastrophising Scale, Pain Self Efficacy … Read more... Read more »

  • July 24, 2011
  • 01:30 PM
  • 1,956 views

Bacteria use slingshots to slice through slime

by aatishb in Empirical Zeal

Bacteria have busy social lives. You might get a glimpse of this the next time you take a shower. The slimy discolored patches that form on bath tiles and on the inside of shower curtains are the mega-cities of the bacterial world. If you zoom into these patches of grime, you’ll find bustling microcosms that are teeming with life at a different scale... Continue reading →... Read more »

Jin F, Conrad JC, Gibiansky ML, & Wong GC. (2011) Bacteria use type-IV pili to slingshot on surfaces. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. PMID: 21768344  

Gibiansky ML, Conrad JC, Jin F, Gordon VD, Motto DA, Mathewson MA, Stopka WG, Zelasko DC, Shrout JD, & Wong GC. (2010) Bacteria use type IV pili to walk upright and detach from surfaces. Science (New York, N.Y.), 330(6001), 197. PMID: 20929769  

  • July 24, 2011
  • 01:01 PM
  • 1,123 views

Blogs/Twitter in Medical Publications: Too Unreliable to Quote or A Change Waiting to Happen?

by Pranab Chatterjee in Scepticemia

Just a few days ago, I was co-authoring a submission for a journal on the issue of handling social media with care and needed to cite a bunch of blogs and non-traditional online sources of information (including Tweets and Friendfeed … Continue reading →... Read more »

Mandavilli A. (2011) Peer review: Trial by Twitter. Nature, 469(7330), 286-7. PMID: 21248816  

  • July 24, 2011
  • 11:59 AM
  • 1,817 views

Seeing double in galaxy mergers

by Emma in we are all in the gutter

How do galaxies grow? One of the most common ways seems to be by merging with other nearby galaxies (a hot research topic that Rita’s talked about in more detail). Seems simple enough, but to really understand how this happens you need to look at a large number of them, at various stages of the [...]... Read more »

R.C. McGurk, C.E. Max, D.J. Rosario, G.A. Shields, K.L. Smith, S.A. Wright. (2011) Spatially-Resolved Spectroscopy of SDSS J0952 2552: a confirmed Dual AGN. Submitted to ApJL. DOI: arXiv:1107.2651  

  • July 24, 2011
  • 06:30 AM
  • 1,224 views

Is There a Placebo Effect – Part II

by Rogue Medic in Rogue Medic

If Daniel Moerman, PhD is correct and the subjective improvement is what is important, then we should pay attention to the following chart of subjective improvement. Subjective improvement is what the patient thinks is real, even if reality does not agree.

When we go to a magic show and see a woman being cut in half, we are experiencing subjective reality. The objective reality is that the woman was never really cut in half, even though our subjective experience is that she has been cut in ha........ Read more »

Wechsler, M., Kelley, J., Boyd, I., Dutile, S., Marigowda, G., Kirsch, I., Israel, E., & Kaptchuk, T. (2011) Active Albuterol or Placebo, Sham Acupuncture, or No Intervention in Asthma. New England Journal of Medicine, 365(2), 119-126. DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1103319  

  • July 24, 2011
  • 06:30 AM
  • 1,381 views

Is There a Placebo Effect – Part II

by Rogue Medic in Rogue Medic

If Daniel Moerman, PhD is correct and the subjective improvement is what is important, then we should pay attention to the following chart of subjective improvement. Subjective improvement is what the patient thinks is real, even if reality does not agree.

When we go to a magic show and see a woman being cut in half, we are experiencing subjective reality. The objective reality is that the woman was never really cut in half, even though our subjective experience is that she has been cut in ha........ Read more »

Wechsler, M., Kelley, J., Boyd, I., Dutile, S., Marigowda, G., Kirsch, I., Israel, E., & Kaptchuk, T. (2011) Active Albuterol or Placebo, Sham Acupuncture, or No Intervention in Asthma. New England Journal of Medicine, 365(2), 119-126. DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1103319  

  • July 23, 2011
  • 07:37 PM
  • 2,185 views

Neuro Bliss and Neuro Codeine

by The Neurocritic in The Neurocritic

Lindsay Lohan drinking Neuro Bliss.NEUROBRANDS®, LLC is a company that markets a series of colorful and attractively designed "nutritional drinks", known as Neuro® Drinks.Neuro Gasm Is Part Of The New Neuro CultureFor a company that has great product placement (with many celebrity endorsements), carefully crafted packaging, and regularly issued press releases, they sure are modest about their marketing efforts:"Neuro Drinks® offer consumers an alternative to products that perpetuate our self........ Read more »

  • July 23, 2011
  • 06:30 PM
  • 1,369 views

Explaining Joshua Bell

by Sam McNerney in Why We Reason

In January of 2007, the Washington Post asked world-renown violinist Joshua Bell to perform the 43-minute piece Bach piece “Sonatas and Partitas for Unaccompanied Violin,” in the L’Enfant Plaza subway station – one of D.C.’s busiest subway stations – during the … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • July 23, 2011
  • 03:09 PM
  • 2,417 views

Viruses hitch-hike through your body along the immune cell highway

by Connor Bamford in The Rule of 6ix



Nipah virus. 
Imagine this: Rhinoviruses - one of the culprits responsible for the common cold - enter our body through the upper respiratory tract yet here it stays; the initial and generally the only site of replication is the nasal epithelium. This is how we get a runny/stuffed nose. Contrast this with a virus like nipah virus - a deadly and re-emerging pathogen spread by bats and found across South-east Asia that also enters our body via the upper respiratory tract yet leads to i........ Read more »

Mathieu, C., Pohl, C., Szecsi, J., Trajkovic-Bodennec, S., Devergnas, S., Raoul, H., Cosset, F., Gerlier, D., Wild, T., & Horvat, B. (2011) Nipah Virus Uses Leukocytes for Efficient Dissemination within a Host. Journal of Virology, 85(15), 7863-7871. DOI: 10.1128/JVI.00549-11  

  • July 23, 2011
  • 01:55 PM
  • 1,362 views

Can Human Metabolism Produce Sugar from Fat?

by Michael Long in Phased

Computational studies suggest that human metabolism can produce glucose from fatty acids. This may explain why the Atkins diet isn't quickly lethal, and why the Inuit aren't inherently obese.... Read more »

Kaleta, C., de Figueiredo, L. F., Werner, S., Guthke, R., Ristow, M., & Schuster, S. (2011) In Silico Evidence for Gluconeogenesis from Fatty Acids in Humans. PLoS Computational Biology, 7(7). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pcbi.1002116  

  • July 23, 2011
  • 01:36 PM
  • 1,390 views

Parasitic wasps turn ladybirds into their bodyguards

by Africa Gomez in BugBlog

I have covered the ladybird parasitoid Dinocampus coccinellae before in BugBlog. Some recent research, however, has uncovered some fascinating aspects of this little wasp's manipulation of its host behaviour worth posting about. The parasitoid wasp, below, injects a single egg on a ladybird using its ovipositor (visible in the top photo of a just emerged D. coccinellae).After hatching, the larva feeds on its host internal organs, and after about 20 days, she emerges from the ventral plates ........ Read more »

Maure F, Brodeur J, Ponlet N, Doyon J, Firlej A, Elguero E, & Thomas F. (2011) The cost of a bodyguard. Biology letters. PMID: 21697162  

  • July 23, 2011
  • 10:13 AM
  • 1,712 views

Famed Farinelli's Flawed Frontalis

by Kristina Killgrove in Powered By Osteons

In 2006, archaeologists exhumed the remains of the legendary 18th century castrato, Carlo Maria Broschi, better known as Farinelli.  As a boy, Farinelli showed talent as an opera singer and, when their father died young, his elder brother Riccardo made the decision to have Farinelli castrated, an illegal operation at the time, in order to preserve his voice.  Farinelli became quite famous by the 1720s and sang daily until his death at the age of 78.  An analysis of the bones has j........ Read more »

  • July 23, 2011
  • 09:00 AM
  • 1,419 views

Tips to help survivors of youth camp shooting in Norway

by Eva Alisic in Trauma Recovery

My thoughts go out to those in Norway who have been affected by the tragic events in the past days, both in Oslo and Utøya. I can’t imagine the scale of this tragedy, and wish survivors all the strength and time needed to come to terms with the experience and the loss of loved ones. This blog describes tips based on posttraumatic stress research and provides links to these resources. ... Read more »

Bisson, J., Brayne, M., Ochberg, F., & Everly, G. (2007) Early Psychosocial Intervention Following Traumatic Events. American Journal of Psychiatry, 164(7), 1016-1019. DOI: 10.1176/appi.ajp.164.7.1016  

  • July 23, 2011
  • 08:00 AM
  • 1,636 views

A Thin Line Between Love And Hate… In Your Brain

by Shaheen Lakhan in Brain Blogger

We are all familiar with the fuzzy feelings that accompany falling in love. You and your partner become emotionally connected, supported, and complete. Although human love is a complicated and long journey, scientists consistently find that the release of a specific neuropetide—oxytocin—may kick start these feelings right away in courtship. In fact, for the past [...]... Read more »

Kosfeld, M., Heinrichs, M., Zak, P., Fischbacher, U., & Fehr, E. (2005) Oxytocin increases trust in humans. Nature, 435(7042), 673-676. DOI: 10.1038/nature03701  

Bartz, J., Zaki, J., Bolger, N., Hollander, E., Ludwig, N., Kolevzon, A., & Ochsner, K. (2010) Oxytocin Selectively Improves Empathic Accuracy. Psychological Science, 21(10), 1426-1428. DOI: 10.1177/0956797610383439  

De Dreu, C., Greer, L., Handgraaf, M., Shalvi, S., Van Kleef, G., Baas, M., Ten Velden, F., Van Dijk, E., & Feith, S. (2010) The Neuropeptide Oxytocin Regulates Parochial Altruism in Intergroup Conflict Among Humans. Science, 328(5984), 1408-1411. DOI: 10.1126/science.1189047  

De Dreu, C., Greer, L., Van Kleef, G., Shalvi, S., & Handgraaf, M. (2011) Oxytocin promotes human ethnocentrism. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 108(4), 1262-1266. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1015316108  

  • July 23, 2011
  • 06:30 AM
  • 1,486 views

Is There a Placebo Effect – Part I

by Rogue Medic in Rogue Medic

There is the statement that a placebo is an inert agent, therefore a placebo cannot do anything. He concludes that there is no placebo effect.

This does not make sense.

The effect of giving an inert treatment is NOT an effect?... Read more »

Wechsler, M., Kelley, J., Boyd, I., Dutile, S., Marigowda, G., Kirsch, I., Israel, E., & Kaptchuk, T. (2011) Active Albuterol or Placebo, Sham Acupuncture, or No Intervention in Asthma. New England Journal of Medicine, 365(2), 119-126. DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1103319  

  • July 23, 2011
  • 12:01 AM
  • 2,254 views

Asthma, placebo, and how not to kill your patients

by Peter Lipson in Science-Based Medicine

A number of years ago I was walking along Lake Michigan with a friend (a fellow medical resident) when she turned to me and said, “are you wheezing?  Do you have asthma?”  I had always been physically active and assumed my breathlessness while walking down the trail was due to the thirty extra pounds of [...]... Read more »

Wechsler ME, Kelley JM, Boyd IO, Dutile S, Marigowda G, Kirsch I, Israel E, & Kaptchuk TJ. (2011) Active albuterol or placebo, sham acupuncture, or no intervention in asthma. The New England journal of medicine, 365(2), 119-26. PMID: 21751905  

  • July 22, 2011
  • 08:39 PM
  • 2,972 views

Who should pay for dates …men or women?

by eHarmony Labs in eHarmony Labs Blog

When the check comes on date, who should reach out first, men or women? Who actually does…find out what the latest research says.... Read more »

  • July 22, 2011
  • 03:12 PM
  • 1,661 views

What Marathoner Mice Can Teach Us

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish

If someone left a treadmill in your living room, how far would you run every day just because you felt like you had some energy to burn? Five miles? Zero miles, and you'd use it as a tie rack? How about 65 miles?Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania and elsewhere studied mutant mice that were missing a particular gene involved in cell signaling. They thought the gene had something to do with muscle development, and sure enough, they found that these mice had some pretty definite abnormal........ Read more »

Pistilli, E., Bogdanovich, S., Garton, F., Yang, N., Gulbin, J., Conner, J., Anderson, B., Quinn, L., North, K., Ahima, R.... (2011) Loss of IL-15 receptor α alters the endurance, fatigability, and metabolic characteristics of mouse fast skeletal muscles. Journal of Clinical Investigation. DOI: 10.1172/JCI44945  

  • July 22, 2011
  • 01:35 PM
  • 2,186 views

Viking Women Immigrated to England, but Were They Warriors or Wives?

by Kristina Killgrove in Powered By Osteons

Today's Daily Mail and Wednesday's USA Today have short articles summarizing a recently-published study by Shane McLeod, called "Warriors and women: the sex ratio of Norse migrants to eastern England up to 900 AD."  It's an interesting little piece, in which McLeod takes issue with the assumption that the Viking "warriors" were only men, an assumption that has been based primarily on grave goods and our own preconceptions about men and women in antiquity.  Previous research into Viking graves ........ Read more »

S. McLeod. (2011) Warriors and women: the sex ratio of Norse migrants to eastern England up to 900 AD. Early Medieval Europe, 19(3), 332-353. info:/10.1111/j.1468-0254.2011.00323.x

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