Post List

  • November 2, 2010
  • 08:21 PM
  • 1,427 views

The Dinosaur Footprint Puzzle: A Content or Process Approach?

by Jack Hassard in The Art of Teaching Science

“Tracking the Footprints Puzzle: The problematic persistence of science-as-process in teaching the nature and culture of science” by Charles R. Ault, Jr. and Jeff Dodick, which was published this month in the journal Science Education, is the research basis for this post.  The article was especially interesting for me since I have used the Footprint [...]


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  • November 2, 2010
  • 07:01 PM
  • 1,028 views

The impact of supply chain glitches

by Jan Husdal in husdal.com

This is an investigation of the effects on shareholder wealth of supply chain glitches that resulted in production or shipment delays, using a sample of 519 announcements made during 1989-2000. On average, shareholder value is decrease by near 11% following an announcement of supply chain problems. » Read more » » »
... Read more »

  • November 2, 2010
  • 06:55 PM
  • 1,130 views

Scary spider story

by Africa Gomez in BugBlog

For a belated Halloween celebration how about some cannibalism on spiders? I have posted before on maternal behaviour in spiders, but, after coming across this species a few times in the last few days (a male above) I had to write on its bizarre, and utterly horrifying behaviour. Amaurobius are common spiders, with three British species which often live on holes in house and garden walls, fence posts or tree trunks. Their holes' entrance is surrounded by a characteristic radial and random web of........ Read more »

  • November 2, 2010
  • 06:43 PM
  • 1,217 views

From the depths of the North Sea, a new ’spoon-nosed’ dolphin

by Laelaps in Laelaps

Paleontology, at least in part, owes its beginnings to fossils turning up where they were not expected. The distribution of shark teeth and fossil shells over the European countryside – vestiges of prehistoric seabeds which had been thrust up to become land over millions of years – were essential clues which naturalists such as the [...]... Read more »

Klaas Post, Erwin J.O. Kompanje. (2010) A new dolphin (Cetacea, Delphinidae) from the Plio-Pleistocene of the North Sea. Deinsea, 1-14. info:/

  • November 2, 2010
  • 05:15 PM
  • 774 views

Bee-havioral epigenetics

by Colby in nutsci.org

A great debate right now that is very relevant to nutrition is to what extent genes vs. environment (or genes in the context of certain environments) influence health and behavior.  The following is an extreme example that cannot be extrapolated … Continue reading →... Read more »

Lyko F, Foret S, Kucharski R, Wolf S, Falckenhayn C, & Maleszka R. (2010) The Honey Bee Epigenomes: Differential Methylation of Brain DNA in Queens and Workers. PLoS Biology. info:/10.1371/journal.pbio.1000506

  • November 2, 2010
  • 05:04 PM
  • 1,327 views

Standing on the shoulders of tyrants

by Duncan Hull in O'Really?

There are at least two ways of looking at the history of Science: If we have seen farther it is by standing on the shoulders of giants. If we have seen farther it is by standing on the shoulders of tyrants. Take Isaac Newton for example, a giant whose shoulders we all stand on today. [...]... Read more »

  • November 2, 2010
  • 04:57 PM
  • 477 views

Cell Traction Forces Independent of Intracellular Biochemistry

by Michael Long in Phased

How may cell shape regulate cell adhesion and spreading, important to many physiological processes, independent of intracellular biochemistry? A predictive model has been developed by Christopher Lemmon (Duke University Medical Center, United States) and Lewis Romer (John Hopkins Medical Institutions, United States) to answer this question.... Read more »

  • November 2, 2010
  • 04:10 PM
  • 861 views

A Side Benefit of the ‘Flu Vaccine – Reduction in Heart Attacks

by Darcy Cowan in Skepticon

It’s a bold claim, that being vaccinated for Influenza will protect you against having a heart attack or Myocardial Infarction (MI). Well according to a study published last month in the Canadian Medical Association Journal that could well be the case. The study, “Influenza vaccination, pneumococcal vaccination and risk of acute myocardial infarction: matched case–control [...]... Read more »

  • November 2, 2010
  • 03:49 PM
  • 1,090 views

Is Bipolar Disorder an Autoimmune Disorder?

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

Hemmo Drexhage, M.D. from Erasmus Medical College presented the November lecture in the Warren Frontiers of Neuroscience Series in Tulsa, Oklahoma.  His presentation was titled "Immunology Meets Psychiatry" and the lecture covered a series of research efforts examining immunological abnormalities in psychiatric conditions.  Here is a summary of my notes from the presentation:Although we know genetic factors account for 60-80% of the variance for the schizophrenia and bipolar disease ri........ Read more »

Drexhage RC, van der Heul-Nieuwenhuijsen L, Padmos RC, van Beveren N, Cohen D, Versnel MA, Nolen WA, & Drexhage HA. (2010) Inflammatory gene expression in monocytes of patients with schizophrenia: overlap and difference with bipolar disorder. A study in naturalistically treated patients. The international journal of neuropsychopharmacology / official scientific journal of the Collegium Internationale Neuropsychopharmacologicum (CINP), 13(10), 1369-81. PMID: 20633309  

Drexhage RC, Knijff EM, Padmos RC, Heul-Nieuwenhuijzen L, Beumer W, Versnel MA, & Drexhage HA. (2010) The mononuclear phagocyte system and its cytokine inflammatory networks in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. Expert review of neurotherapeutics, 10(1), 59-76. PMID: 20021321  

Padmos RC, Hillegers MH, Knijff EM, Vonk R, Bouvy A, Staal FJ, de Ridder D, Kupka RW, Nolen WA, & Drexhage HA. (2008) A discriminating messenger RNA signature for bipolar disorder formed by an aberrant expression of inflammatory genes in monocytes. Archives of general psychiatry, 65(4), 395-407. PMID: 18391128  

  • November 2, 2010
  • 02:00 PM
  • 891 views

Waking sleeping bacteria

by Lab Rat in Lab Rat

There are quite a few bacteria that, when times are hard, are able to put themselves into a state of metabolic inactivity. They are still technically alive - just not really eating, growing or changing in any way, just waiting until conditions become more favourable so that they can regain normal active behaviour. The bacteria used most frequently to explore this behaviour is B. subtilis which frequently form spores in response to adverse conditions, such as lack of nutrients or extremes of temp........ Read more »

Dworkin J, & Shah IM. (2010) Exit from dormancy in microbial organisms. Nature reviews. Microbiology. PMID: 20972452  

  • November 2, 2010
  • 02:00 PM
  • 801 views

Food is Not Medicine - Almond Edition

by Kevin Bonham in Food Matters

A while back, ERV had a post about the tenuous link between Vitamin D and all sorts of effects on health (and I shamelessly co-opted her title). Then, PalMD dissected the spurious link between Broccoli and cancer. Now it's my turn:

A new study has revealed that naturally occurring chemicals found in the skin of the nut boost the immune system's response to such infections.
Researchers found almond skins improved the ability of the white blood cells to detect viruses while also increasing the b........ Read more »

Arena, A., Bisignano, C., Stassi, G., Mandalari, G., Wickham, M., & Bisignano, G. (2010) Immunomodulatory and antiviral activity of almond skins. Immunology Letters, 132(1-2), 18-23. DOI: 10.1016/j.imlet.2010.04.010  

  • November 2, 2010
  • 01:18 PM
  • 802 views

Food is Not Medicine - Almond Edition [We Beasties]

by Kevin none@example.com in Food Matters

A while back, ERV had a post about the tenuous link between Vitamin D and all sorts of effects on health (and I shamelessly co-opted her title). Then, PalMD dissected the spurious link between Broccoli and cancer. Now it's my turn:

A new study has revealed that naturally occurring chemicals found in the skin of the nut boost the immune system's response to such infections.
Researchers found almond skins improved the ability of the white blood cells to detect viruses while also increasing the b........ Read more »

Arena, A., Bisignano, C., Stassi, G., Mandalari, G., Wickham, M., & Bisignano, G. (2010) Immunomodulatory and antiviral activity of almond skins. Immunology Letters, 132(1-2), 18-23. DOI: 10.1016/j.imlet.2010.04.010  

  • November 2, 2010
  • 12:00 PM
  • 188 views

Rafflesia arnoldii

by beredim in Strange Animals

R. arnoldii is a plant best known for producing the largest flowers in the world and for its hideous, rotten flesh-like odor. The article contains images, videos and facts about this rare plant.... Read more »

Nikolov LA, Endress PK, Sugumaran M, Sasirat S, Vessabutr S, Kramer EM, & Davis CC. (2013) Developmental origins of the world's largest flowers, Rafflesiaceae. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 110(46), 18578-83. PMID: 24167265  

Schmid, R., & Nais, J. (2003) Rafflesia of the World. Taxon, 52(4), 884. DOI: 10.2307/3647375  

  • November 2, 2010
  • 11:38 AM
  • 1,468 views

This Week in the Universe: October 26th – November 1st

by S.C. Kavassalis in The Language of Bad Physics

Astrophysics and Gravitation:
Hubble Tries to See into the Future
Illustration Credit: NASA, ESA, and G. Bacon (STScI), Science Credit: NASA, ESA, and J. Anderson and R. van der Marel (STScI)
From NASA, ESA, and J. Anderson and R. van der Marel (STScI):
The multicolor snapshot, at top, taken with Wide Field Camera 3 aboard NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, captures the central region of the giant globular cluster Omega Centauri. All the stars in the image are moving in random direction........ Read more »

  • November 2, 2010
  • 11:34 AM
  • 1,025 views

Language Skills Help Boys Develop Self-Regulation

by Amy Webb in The Thoughtful Parent

Many a parent of a toddler has encouraged their child to "use your words" in dealing with a problem or request, instead of crying, acting out, or whining. It turns out that teaching toddlers to "use their words" is especially useful in helping boys develop self-regulation. A recent study published in Early Childhood Research Quarterly found that language skills are more important in the development of self-regulation skills in young boys than young girls.The study looked at children as they deve........ Read more »

Claire Vallotton, & Catherine Ayoub. (2010) Use your words: The role of language in the development of toddlers' self-regulation. Early Childhood Research Quarterly. info:/

  • November 2, 2010
  • 11:06 AM
  • 930 views

The molecular pathology of cancer: a glimpse into the future

by Sally Church in Pharma Strategy Blog

Here’s a nice paper that I’ve been reading, written by Tim Harris and Frank McCormick on cancer biology.  Lately, we’ve all seen how advances in DNA sequencing and genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are driving the discovery of the germline and … Continue reading →... Read more »

Harris, T., & McCormick, F. (2010) The molecular pathology of cancer. Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology, 7(5), 251-265. DOI: 10.1038/nrclinonc.2010.41  

  • November 2, 2010
  • 09:42 AM
  • 719 views

The Brain Suppresses Incorrect Competing Memories

by APS Daily Observations in Daily Observations

Imagine that you are trying to remember the name of actor Kevin Bacon, but the name of someone you went to college with, Michael Bacon, keeps getting in the way. ... Read more »

Healey, M.K., Campbell, K.L., Hasher, L., & Ossher, L. (2010) Direct evidence for the role of inhibition in resolving interference in memory. Psychological science : a journal of the Association for Psychological Science/ APS. PMID: 20807896  

  • November 2, 2010
  • 08:13 AM
  • 755 views

Dendritic Polyglycerol Sulfates for Inflammatory Diseases

by Michael Long in Phased

Rainer Haag (Freie Universitat Berlin) and coworkers have synthesized a branched polymer that potently inhibits L and P selectin activity in mice, and thus shows promise as a treatment for inflammatory diseases.... Read more »

Dernedde, J., Rausch, A., Weinhart, M., Enders, S., Tauber, R., Licha, K., Schirner, M., Zugel, U., von Bonin, A., & Haag, R. (2010) Dendritic polyglycerol sulfates as multivalent inhibitors of inflammation. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1003103107  

  • November 2, 2010
  • 08:00 AM
  • 1,538 views

How Poverty-Promotes Obesity in Indonesia

by Arya M. Sharma in Dr. Sharma's Obesity Notes

I have previously blogged about the importance of maternal ill-health and malnutrition as a key driver of the childhood obesity epidemic. Not surprisingly, this statement appears even more relevant, when we look at the emerging obesity epidemic in developing countries.
Thus in an article just released online in Obesity Reviews, Avita Usfar and colleagues examine obesity [...]... Read more »

Usfar AA, Lebenthal E, Atmarita, Achadi E, Soekirman, & Hadi H. (2010) Obesity as a poverty-related emerging nutrition problems: the case of Indonesia. Obesity reviews : an official journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity. PMID: 20977602  

  • November 2, 2010
  • 07:11 AM
  • 726 views

Bacterial electricity

by Becky in It Takes 30

What is electricity?  It’s moving electrons.  Every living thing moves electrons around, not just in nerves (for those of us that have them) but also in metabolism (oxidize one thing, reduce another). Is it possible to use this metabolic electricity to communicate with man-made devices?  If you could, you might be able to make very [...]... Read more »

Jensen HM, Albers AE, Malley KR, Londer YY, Cohen BE, Helms BA, Weigele P, Groves JT, & Ajo-Franklin CM. (2010) Engineering of a synthetic electron conduit in living cells. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. PMID: 20956333  

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