Post List

  • February 5, 2011
  • 06:00 PM
  • 1,240 views

Are you a Shopping Addict? Try the ‘Shopaholic Test’!

by Stuart Farrimond in Dr Stu's Science Blog

I’m starting to get concerned. My wife has just started looking for her next handbag, and she has expensive tastes…

Are you the type of person who lives to shop? Or are you like me, and do you think that ‘retail therapy’ is a contradiction in terms? Today’s blog is all about the ‘Shopping Addiction’ phenomenon: Find out what it is, shopaholic myths and take an online quiz to find out if you are a shopaholic…... Read more »

Valence, G., d'Astous, A., & Fortier, L. (1988) Compulsive buying: Concept and measurement. Journal of Consumer Policy, 11(4), 419-433. DOI: 10.1007/BF00411854  

  • February 5, 2011
  • 10:59 AM
  • 1,171 views

The Fourth Kind | a frank discussion and review

by Michael Lombardi in a New Life in the Sea


This weekend was an extra-terrestrial movie double header...but not of the District 9 type. Rather, despite the 'fiction' label on the DVD box, I took a deeper look at the realities of the paranormal and prophecy. This discussion will span the next several posts here on 'a New Life'.

The first film was 'The Fourth Kind'. Call me what you will, but I watched it late one night by myself, and it scared the bejeezums out of me.

This film portrays a series of psycho paranormal events&nbs........ Read more »

  • February 5, 2011
  • 10:46 AM
  • 1,602 views

Egypt Week – Oxytocin and Ethnocentrism

by Jon Wilkins in Lost in Transcription

So, as we approach the end of Egypt Week, we are going to talk about recent paper in PNAS. The researchers examined the effects of oxytocin on the extent to which people exhibit in-group favoritism. They use ethnic markers to indicate in-group versus out-group membership. In this study, which was performed in the Netherlands, the in-group was Dutch and out-groups were German or Arab.

Here's the bottom line: subjects who were given oxytocin were more likely to favor in-group members relative to........ Read more »

De Dreu CK, Greer LL, Van Kleef GA, Shalvi S, & Handgraaf MJ. (2011) Oxytocin promotes human ethnocentrism. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 108(4), 1262-6. PMID: 21220339  

  • February 5, 2011
  • 07:11 AM
  • 1,077 views

Studying viral infection at the whole-organism level

by Connor Bamford in The Rule of 6ix

What can the zebrafish tell us about viral infection? Well, a recently published paper uses transparent zebrafish larvae to follow infection and pathogenesis of Infectious Hematopoietic Necrosis Virus - an important salmonid pathogen.... Read more »

  • February 5, 2011
  • 05:22 AM
  • 323 views

Belyaev's Foxes - Introduction - Part I

by Leema in Some Thoughts About Dogs

A summary of the work of Belaev in his ongoing experiment with foxes.... Read more »

Belyaev, DK. (1979) Destablizing selection as a factor in domestication. Journal of Heredity, 70(5), 301-308. info:/

Kukekova, A., Trut, L., Oskina, I., Johnson, J., Temnykh, S., Kharlamova, A., Shepeleva, D., Gulievich, R., Shikhevich, S., Graphodatsky, A.... (2007) A meiotic linkage map of the silver fox, aligned and compared to the canine genome. Genome Research, 17(3), 387-399. DOI: 10.1101/gr.5893307  

  • February 5, 2011
  • 03:52 AM
  • 619 views

Welcome, "Monsterous Murderer"!

by Paleochick in Paleochick's Digs

A new Tyrannosaurus from the Kaiparowits Formation is named..... Read more »

  • February 5, 2011
  • 01:15 AM
  • 1,011 views

Psycasm - It's like a blog in your ears

by Rift in Psycasm


So I've been a bit snowed under lately. As I mentioned recently, we've had some pretty big floods in my part of the world, and as a result all my summer semester workload has backed-up into one ugly pile of responsibility.And so my blogging has been a bit light on while I tackle these assignments and exams. Fear not, as soon as I get the chance I fully intend to look into what the litera; (read more)

Source: Psycasm - Discipline: Psychology... Read more »

  • February 4, 2011
  • 06:41 PM
  • 356 views

Want to read faster, think more creatively, and be a better person? Buy more brand-name stuff.

by Melanie Tannenbaum in ionpsych

What are some consequences of eating too much fast food? Weight gain? Check. Higher cholesterol? Check. Increased reading speed? Wait. Back up. Yes – as it turns out, fast food can have consequences that reach far beyond the bigger-bellied symptoms … Continue reading →... Read more »

Zhong CB, & Devoe SE. (2010) You are how you eat: fast food and impatience. Psychological science : a journal of the American Psychological Society / APS, 21(5), 619-22. PMID: 20483836  

Mazar N, & Zhong CB. (2010) Do green products make us better people?. Psychological science : a journal of the American Psychological Society / APS, 21(4), 494-8. PMID: 20424089  

  • February 4, 2011
  • 06:14 PM
  • 1,809 views

Flooding and disease

by James Byrne in Disease Prone


I’m not sure what the coverage has been like overseas but most of the east coast of Australia has been hit pretty hard. First there were biggest floods Australia has seen for a VERY long time that started in Queensland and continue to affect the east cost of Australia. Then, instead of letting Queensland off the hook for a few weeks nature hit the coast with a cyclone THE SIZE OF THE U.S.A. that might move so far inland that it could dump rain into my state, which is a desert, halfway across ........ Read more »

Ohl, C. (2000) Flooding and human health. BMJ, 321(7270), 1167-1168. DOI: 10.1136/bmj.321.7270.1167  

Howard MJ, Brillman JC, & Burkle FM Jr. (1996) Infectious disease emergencies in disasters. Emergency medicine clinics of North America, 14(2), 413-28. PMID: 8635416  

  • February 4, 2011
  • 05:38 PM
  • 1,325 views

Hidden in plain sight: discovering cryptic vesper bats in the European biota

by Darren Naish in Tetrapod Zoology

In terms of its zoological diversity, Europe is the best known continent on the planet. Indeed it's generally assumed that just about all of Europe's macrofauna has, by now, been discovered. While that's mostly true, it seems that at least a few extremely similar species - so called 'cryptic species' - have been missed, mostly because they're extremely similar to their close relatives.





Here, I want to look briefly at new discoveries made concerning the diversity of European microbats [compo........ Read more »

  • February 4, 2011
  • 05:04 PM
  • 1,473 views

IQ Test for bacteria

by Jonathan Eisen in The Tree of Life





Social IQ of bacteria
Another quick one here.  Interesting paper out in BMC Genomics: Genome sequence of the pattern forming Paenibacillus vortex bacterium reveals potential for thriving in complex environments

The paper is from Eshel-Ben Jacob and colleagues from many institutions around the world.

Here is a summary of the article (from the paper)

BackgroundThe pattern-forming bacterium Paenibacillus vortex is notable for its advanced social behavior, which is reflected in deve........ Read more »

  • February 4, 2011
  • 04:59 PM
  • 1,074 views

Casual sex is not so bad after all

by Tom Rees in Epiphenom



Some women from Mars
A while ago I read a paper arguing that religion 'protected' teens against sex. It was your usual analysis - finding that religious teens are less likely to have sex outside of marriage - but the tacit presumption intrigued me. Is sex really that harmful?

Well, no one study is going to answer that, but here's one from Jesse Owen and colleagues at the University of Louisville helps shed some light on it.

Their study has the advantage over most in this field in that it's l........ Read more »

  • February 4, 2011
  • 04:03 PM
  • 869 views

Touching Death

by Eric Michael Johnson in The Primate Diaries in Exile

The latest stop in the #PDEx tour is being hosted by The Prancing Papio:There is something intensely animal about our relationship with the dead. As an atheist I don’t feel particular reverence or awe at the site of a cadaver. It mostly just creeps me out. But even religious believers, those who should be comfortable with the idea that a dead body retains no trace of the person they once knew, also seem to have trouble letting go of what St. Paul called “confidence in the flesh.” In funera........ Read more »

Cronin, K., van Leeuwen, E., Mulenga, I., & Bodamer, M. (2011) Behavioral response of a chimpanzee mother toward her dead infant. American Journal of Primatology. DOI: 10.1002/ajp.20927  

  • February 4, 2011
  • 04:03 PM
  • 886 views

Touching Death

by Eric Michael Johnson in The Primate Diaries

The latest stop in the #PDEx tour is being hosted by The Prancing Papio:There is something intensely animal about our relationship with the dead. As an atheist I don’t feel particular reverence or awe at the site of a cadaver. It mostly just creeps me out. But even religious believers, those who should be comfortable with the idea that a dead body retains no trace of the person they once knew, also seem to have trouble letting go of what St. Paul called “confidence in the flesh.” In funera........ Read more »

Cronin, K., van Leeuwen, E., Mulenga, I., & Bodamer, M. (2011) Behavioral response of a chimpanzee mother toward her dead infant. American Journal of Primatology. DOI: 10.1002/ajp.20927  

  • February 4, 2011
  • 02:07 PM
  • 953 views

CUDA: An update

by Marco Frasca in The Gauge Connection

My activity with CUDA technology by Nvidia and parallel computing is going on (see here).  I was able to get up and running the code made available by Pedro Bicudo and Nuno Cardoso (see here) on my machine. This is a code for SU(2) QCD and, currently, these colleagues are working on the SU(3) version. [...]... Read more »

  • February 4, 2011
  • 01:24 PM
  • 1,450 views

Early Complex Societies & Early Organized Religions

by Cris Campbell in Genealogy of Religion

Historians have long known that the shelf life of complex societies throughout human history has been rather limited. Archaeologists are aware of this also. But how to explain it?
In a recent (open access) paper, “Cycling in the Complexity of Early Societies,” Sergey Gavrilets and colleagues mathematically modeled early complex societies using a number of variables [...]... Read more »

Gavrilets, Sergey, Anderson, David G., & Turchin, Peter. (2010) Cycling in the Complexity of Early Societies. Cliodynamics: The Journal of Theoretical and Mathematical History, 1(1), 59-80. info:/http://escholarship.org/uc/item/5536t55r

  • February 4, 2011
  • 12:18 PM
  • 1,599 views

Culturomics does not exist

by Bjørn Østman in Pleiotropy

'Culturomics' does not exist. As far as I'm concerned, if it isn't on Wikipedia, it doesn't exist. However, it is listed on Wikipedia's Word of the year for 2010 under the designation 'Least likely to succeed'. As an amusing side note, it also says this: Most Unnecessary: refudiate (Blend of refute and repudiate used by Sarah Palin on Twitter. The laughs.... Read more »

Michel, J., Shen, Y., Aiden, A., Veres, A., Gray, M., , ., Pickett, J., Hoiberg, D., Clancy, D., Norvig, P.... (2010) Quantitative Analysis of Culture Using Millions of Digitized Books. Science, 331(6014), 176-182. DOI: 10.1126/science.1199644  

  • February 4, 2011
  • 12:16 PM
  • 992 views

Tricks of the trade: chimpanzees and their tools

by Djuke Veldhuis in Elements Science

Deep in the African rainforest researchers continue to find a wide array of tool use in wild chimpanzee populations. Djuke Veldhuis examines what is happening in the emerging field of primate archaeology.



Related posts:Science spreads through African lands
... Read more »

  • February 4, 2011
  • 09:04 AM
  • 1,423 views

Adaptationism in the Human Penis

by zinjanthropus in A Primate of Modern Aspect

As Scicurious’ mom points out, penises are funny lookin’. As long as humans have been humans, men and women have looked down and thought, “now what could be the possible reason for that?” The question no doubt vexed our early ancestors so much that they simply had to evolve larger brains to think about it [...]... Read more »

Bowman EA. (2010) An explanation for the shape of the human penis. Archives of sexual behavior, 39(2), 216. PMID: 19851854  

BIRKHEAD, T., & HUNTER, F. (1990) Mechanisms of sperm competition. Trends in Ecology , 5(2), 48-52. DOI: 10.1016/0169-5347(90)90047-H  

  • February 4, 2011
  • 09:00 AM
  • 1,239 views

Online Plagiarism and Cybercheating Still Strong – 61.9%

by Richard Landers in NeoAcademic

In a study of 1222 undergraduates, Selwyn examined differences in cybercheating levels between a variety of majors and student types. Overall results? 61.9% of students cheat.... Read more »

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