Post List

  • September 7, 2010
  • 07:06 AM
  • 910 views

What’s the buzz?: Synthetic marijuana, K2, Spice, JWH-018

by David J Kroll in Terra Sigillata

The topic of one of our most popular posts of all time has been the synthetic marijuana products containing JWH compounds, naphthoylindole cannabimimetics synthesized in the 1990s in the Clemson University laboratory of John Huffman. This post first appeared at the ScienceBlogs home of Terra Sigillata on 9 Feb 2010 and gives you some background [...]... Read more »

Aung MM, Griffin G, Huffman JW, Wu M, Keel C, Yang B, Showalter VM, Abood ME, & Martin BR. (2000) Influence of the N-1 alkyl chain length of cannabimimetic indoles upon CB(1) and CB(2) receptor binding. Drug and alcohol dependence, 60(2), 133-40. PMID: 10940540  

  • September 7, 2010
  • 06:15 AM
  • 1,219 views

Genetic differences within European populations

by Razib Khan in Gene Expression

One of the more popular posts on this weblog (going by StumbleUpon and search engine referrers) focuses on genetic variation in Europe as a function of geography. In some ways the results are common sense; populations closer to each other are more genetically related. Why not? Historically people have married their neighbors and so gene [...]... Read more »

Moskvina V, Smith M, Ivanov D, Blackwood D, Stclair D, Hultman C, Toncheva D, Gill M, Corvin A, O'Dushlaine C.... (2010) Genetic Differences between Five European Populations. Human heredity, 70(2), 141-149. PMID: 20616560  

  • September 7, 2010
  • 06:14 AM
  • 610 views

Assassination or accident?

by iayork in Mystery Rays from Outer Space

I have as much respect for viruses’ ability to manipulate their host as the next guy, and I’m probably more of a fan of viral immune evasion than that next guy. But I still do think that coincidences do happen. A paper from John Trowsdale and colleagues1 shows that Kaposi’s Sarcoma Herpesvirus (KSHV) destroys HFE, [...]... Read more »

Rohrlich PS, Fazilleau N, Ginhoux F, Firat H, Michel F, Cochet M, Laham N, Roth MP, Pascolo S, Nato F.... (2005) Direct recognition by alphabeta cytolytic T cells of Hfe, a MHC class Ib molecule without antigen-presenting function. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 102(36), 12855-60. PMID: 16123136  

Drakesmith H, Chen N, Ledermann H, Screaton G, Townsend A, & Xu XN. (2005) HIV-1 Nef down-regulates the hemochromatosis protein HFE, manipulating cellular iron homeostasis. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 102(31), 11017-22. PMID: 16043695  

  • September 7, 2010
  • 05:30 AM
  • 444 views

Testing the trade relations theory that we are usually reluctant to “fight our customers”

by SAGE Insight in SAGE Insight

Trade and foreign policy attitudes From Journal of Conflict Resolution This forty-seven-country survey focuses on attitudes toward two major participants in the international trading system, the United States and China. The study tests the liberal international relations theory that trade influences whether we view others as friendly or threatening, and the idea that the benefits [...]... Read more »

Katja B. Kleinberg, & Benjamin O. Fordham. (2010) Trade and Foreign Policy Attitudes. Journal of Conflict Resolution. info:/10.1177/0022002710364128

  • September 7, 2010
  • 05:30 AM
  • 395 views

Testing the trade relations theory that we are usually reluctant to “fight our customers”

by SAGE Insight in SAGE Insight

Trade and foreign policy attitudes From Journal of Conflict Resolution This forty-seven-country survey focuses on attitudes toward two major participants in the international trading system, the United States and China. The study tests the liberal international relations theory that trade influences whether we view others as friendly or threatening, and the idea that the benefits [...]... Read more »

Katja B. Kleinberg, & Benjamin O. Fordham. (2010) Trade and Foreign Policy Attitudes. Journal of Conflict Resolution. info:/10.1177/0022002710364128

  • September 7, 2010
  • 05:20 AM
  • 903 views

Do you have a decision-making style?

by David Winter in Careers - in Theory

Is diagnosing an individual's decision-making style too simplistic? Would it be better to look at a more complex decision-making profile instead?... Read more »

Itamar Gati, Shiri Landman, Shlomit Davidovitch, Lisa Asulin-Peretz, & Reuma Gadassi. (2010) From career decision-making styles to career decision-making profiles: A multidimensional approach. Journal of Vocational Behavior, 76(2), 277-291. DOI: 10.1016/j.jvb.2009.11.001  

  • September 7, 2010
  • 04:51 AM
  • 773 views

Commonalities in Risk Factors for Age-Related Disease

by Reason in Fight Aging!

A great deal of medical research into aging is built upon a foundation of correlation studies: what can we identify as more often occurring for patients who suffer from a particular age-related condition? Are there environmental factors, lifestyle choices, or genetic differences that are statistically linked to the occurrence of this condition? The next step that follows from the identification of such correlations is to pick them apart looking for commonalities. Why do these many correlations e........ Read more »

  • September 7, 2010
  • 02:33 AM
  • 724 views

Is recognition without awareness possible?

by William Lu in The Quantum Lobe Chronicles

It seems common knowledge in the world of neuroscience that episodic memories are formed through conscious awareness. However, a couple of years ago Voss and Paller found that this may not necessarily be the case. They had subjects perform a forced choice recognition task using kaleidoscope images (for novelty's sake). Interestingly, accuracy was highest when subjects reported guessing, thus indicating little awareness that the studied images had been seen before. "This indicates that episodic m........ Read more »

  • September 7, 2010
  • 02:00 AM
  • 1,284 views

Daydreaming…..

by Dr Shock in Dr Shock MD PhD


A daydream is a visionary fantasy, especially one of happy, pleasant thoughts, hopes or ambitions, imagined as coming to pass, and experienced while awake. Some people may devote 50% of their awake time with daydreaming. Recently a case study was published in which a 36 year old female has a long history of excessive daydreaming. [...]


Related posts:Individual Differences in Empathy
Brain Blogging, Forty-Seventh Edition
Photograph Use on Social Networks
... Read more »

  • September 7, 2010
  • 01:54 AM
  • 930 views

Gaming for good: human thought beats computer algorithms at solving protein structures

by Anna Goldstein in Berkeley Science Review Blog

Considering my fascination of late with unusual author lists in science papers, you can guess how excited I was to see an article in Nature that credited online gamers. I was especially amused to see that citation services like PubMed … Continue reading →... Read more »

Cooper S, Khatib F, Treuille A, Barbero J, Lee J, Beenen M, Leaver-Fay A, Baker D, Popović Z, & Players F. (2010) Predicting protein structures with a multiplayer online game. Nature, 466(7307), 756-60. PMID: 20686574  

  • September 6, 2010
  • 10:02 PM
  • 918 views

If Molluscs Could Communicate What Would They Say?

by Dr. M in Deep Sea News

Why don’t animal’s use wheels in locomotion? Why aren’t blue whales bigger? Why are there no freshwater starfish? Why are there no tree dwelling cephalopods? Why can’t my dog make a decent cocktail? These are the kinds of questions that intrigue me. Apparently I am not alone.
Geerat Vermeij’s new paper “Sound reasons for . . . → Read More: If Molluscs Could Communicate What Would They Say?... Read more »

  • September 6, 2010
  • 09:22 PM
  • 856 views

Recombine to get better

by Natascha Bushati in the Node

Recently a paper in Science caught my attention since its title combines the words mitotic recombination with patients and Ichthyosis. Having worked with Drosophila during my PhD and now being in a vertebrate lab, I’m well aware of the existence of tools to induce mitotic recombination to generate somatic clones of mutant cells in certain tissues. So I had a closer look at the paper to understand more about the spontaneous occurrence of mitotic recombination in humans.... Read more »

Choate KA, Lu Y, Zhou J, Choi M, Elias PM, Farhi A, Nelson-Williams C, Crumrine D, Williams ML, Nopper AJ.... (2010) Mitotic Recombination in Patients with Ichthyosis Causes Reversion of Dominant Mutations in KRT10. Science (New York, N.Y.). PMID: 20798280  

  • September 6, 2010
  • 07:02 PM
  • 948 views

Radiotherapy can cure cancer – but UK patients might be missing out

by Cancer Research UK in Cancer Research UK - Science Update

There’s an important cancer treatment, which is widely available in the rest of Europe, that isn’t being offered to nearly as many patients in the UK as it should be. But this isn’t an expensive new drug. We’re talking about radiotherapy – a cost-effective treatment that actually cures more patients than all the new drugs [...]... Read more »

Bentzen SM, Heeren G, Cottier B, Slotman B, Glimelius B, Lievens Y, & van den Bogaert W. (2005) Towards evidence-based guidelines for radiotherapy infrastructure and staffing needs in Europe: the ESTRO QUARTS project. Radiotherapy and oncology : journal of the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, 75(3), 355-65. PMID: 16086915  

Williams MV, & Drinkwater KJ. (2009) Radiotherapy in England in 2007: modelled demand and audited activity. Clinical oncology (Royal College of Radiologists (Great Britain)), 21(8), 575-90. PMID: 19651499  

Williams MV, Summers ET, Drinkwater K, & Barrett A. (2007) Radiotherapy dose fractionation, access and waiting times in the countries of the UK in 2005. Clinical oncology (Royal College of Radiologists (Great Britain)), 19(5), 273-86. PMID: 17517327  

  • September 6, 2010
  • 05:36 PM
  • 608 views

Gender, religion, and volunteering

by Tom Rees in Epiphenom

Here's a quick one on study of volunteering among older people. It's well known that religious people do more formal voluntary work, on average, than the non-religious. What's less well understood is why that should be.

Well, one other thing that's notable about religion in the USA is that it's more popular with women. And women also tend to volunteer more (well, both those 'facts' are more or less true depending on which study you look at).

In this new study, Lydia Manning of Miami University........ Read more »

  • September 6, 2010
  • 04:57 PM
  • 1,078 views

Giving way to the right – the Brits could be onto something

by Lorimer Moseley in BodyInMind

Some time ago we posted an article that showed that a unicellular organism called slimeball could solve the planning of the British rail network better than the Brits did. Now it might be time to smirk on the other side of our face because, as Sarah Wallwork, the tireless Honours student who had the misfortune [...]... Read more »

Groeppel-Klein, A . (2008) Anti-Clockwise or Clockwise? The Impact of Store Layout on the Process of Orientation in a Discount Store. European Advances in Consumer Research, 415. info:/

  • September 6, 2010
  • 04:11 PM
  • 1,162 views

Follow Dr. Bik to the Gulf!

by Holly Bik in Deep Sea News

Remember Dr. M’s recent disturbing post about the quelling of independent science in the Gulf?  I can now officially announce that my lab was one of the recipients of the rapid response research grants awarded by the National Science Foundation—hurrah!  I’m the postdoc assigned to this project, which aims to characterize pre-spill meiofaunal community structure in . . . → Read More: Follow Dr. Bik to the Gulf!... Read more »

  • September 6, 2010
  • 03:54 PM
  • 522 views

Learning: Is reinforcement required?

by Psychology 379 bloggers in Cognition & the Arts

Originally posted on Cognitive Daily. This is a guest post by Laura Younger, one of Greta’s top student writers from Spring 2007 Everyone has heard of the concept of reinforcement. You reinforce your child with dessert after finishing his or her vegetables; you praise your dog with ear scratches for not barking at the mailman; [...]... Read more »

Seitz AR, Nanez JE Sr, Holloway S, Tsushima Y, & Watanabe T. (2006) Two cases requiring external reinforcement in perceptual learning. Journal of vision, 6(9), 966-73. PMID: 17083288  

  • September 6, 2010
  • 03:32 PM
  • 784 views

The Molbio Carnival: second edition

by Lucas in thoughtomics







Welcome everybody! I’m glad you found us here at the second stop of the traveling MolBio carnival. If you’ve got an eye for the small and tiny you have arrived at the right address, as our rides and bazaars are specialized in molecular and cellular biology! I’ll be happy guide you along the carnival [...]... Read more »

  • September 6, 2010
  • 01:49 PM
  • 954 views

More on Phoneme Inventory Size and Demography

by Wintz in A Replicated Typo 2.0

On the basis of Sean’s comment, about using a regression to look at how phoneme inventory size improved as geographic spread was incorporated along with population size, I decided to look at the stats a bit more closely (original post is here). It’s fairly easy to perform multiple regression in R, which, in the case of . . . → Read More: More on Phoneme Inventory Size and Demography... Read more »

John Fox. (2005) Nonparametric Regression. Encyclopedia of Statistics in Behavioral Science. DOI: 10.1002/0470013192.bsa446  

  • September 6, 2010
  • 01:00 PM
  • 1,025 views

Listeria's Visiting Card

by Moselio Schaechter in Small Things Considered

by Elio

During infection, host and parasite carry out repeated and intense conversations that often rise to the level of shouting matches. The language they use is chemical, the words and sentences eloquent and forceful. Eavesdropping on the conversation between Listeria monocytogenes LINK 5 and immune cells of its host, Portnoy and colleagues LINK 1 discovered an intriguing linguistic use for a novel “second messenger,” cyclic-di-AMP (c-di-AMP).

It has been known that Listeria, like man........ Read more »

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