Post List

  • September 29, 2010
  • 12:26 AM
  • 1,137 views

The impacts of top predator declines...

by John Carroll in Chronicles of Zostera

(My best shark photo, sorry!)So I check out Underwater Times from time to time to see whats new in the underwater news world.  So when I happened upon this article from the United Arab Emirates, it reminded me of a Science paper that came out a few years back that is near and dear to my heart.  But first, the news article.  Essentially, sharks are a major fishery in the Arabian Gulf.  From 1985 to 2000, shark landings in the UAE ranged from 1350 to 1900 tons of sharks, and th........ Read more »

Myers RA, Baum JK, Shepherd TD, Powers SP, & Peterson CH. (2007) Cascading effects of the loss of apex predatory sharks from a coastal ocean. Science (New York, N.Y.), 315(5820), 1846-50. PMID: 17395829  

Stephen R. Fegley,* Charles H. Peterson, Nathan R. Geraldi and David W. Gaskill. (2009) Enhancing the Potential for Population Recovery: Restoration Options for Bay Scallop Populations, Argopecten irradians concentricus, in North Carolina. Journal of Shellfish Research, 28(3), 477-489. info:/10.2983/035.028.0309

  • September 28, 2010
  • 11:56 PM
  • 811 views

Go on…expose yourself!

by Bronwyn Thompson in Healthskills: Skills for Healthy Living

…er, maybe not that way OK?! Graded exposure in vivo (with response prevention) is a specific treatment for pain-related anxiety/fear and avoidance.  More specifically, it’s for people who are avoiding activities that are not going to harm them, but may increase their pain.  Their beliefs as to why they ‘shouldn’t do’ these activities or movements … Read more... Read more »

  • September 28, 2010
  • 11:53 PM
  • 1,115 views

Not Good Enough: Copenhagen Accord May Doom Coral Reefs

by Rick MacPherson in Deep Sea News

The left image represents an intact system at current CO2 levels; the center image shows coral decay with increased CO2; and the right image shows a devastated system with even higher CO2 emissions. O. Hoegh-Guldberg, et al (2007) Coral reefs under rapid climate change and ocean acidification, Science, 318(5857), p. 1741
When you’re in the biodiversity conservation . . . → Read More: Not Good Enough: Copenhagen Accord May Doom Coral Reefs... Read more »

Joeri Rogelj, Claudine Chen, Julia Nabel, Kirsten Macey, William Hare, MichielSchaeffer, Kathleen Markmann, Niklas Höhne, Katrine Krogh Andersen and Malte Meinshausen. (2010) Analysis of the Copenhagen Accord pledges and its global climatic impacts – a snapshot of dissonant ambitions. Environmental Research Letters, 5(4). info:/

  • September 28, 2010
  • 09:05 PM
  • 835 views

The Wednesday Post - Bacteria ride the Trojan Worm

by James Byrne in Disease Prone

Niu et al., (2010) look at novel host-pathogen interactions and do their work in a nematode called Caenorhabditis elegans due to the ease of working with an invertebrate. C. elegans also has other advantages. We have a lot of genetic tools for manipulating the organism and in some pretty inspired Nobel Prize winning work we know the cell lineage of ALL the cells in the mature worm. This makes them a fantastic model organism for any kind of research, particularly modeling bacterial infection and........ Read more »

Niu Q, Huang X, Zhang L, Xu J, Yang D, Wei K, Niu X, An Z, Bennett JW, Zou C.... (2010) From the Cover: A Trojan horse mechanism of bacterial pathogenesis against nematodes. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 107(38), 16631-6. PMID: 20733068  

  • September 28, 2010
  • 08:00 PM
  • 476 views

Cocaine Seeking is Gated by CART

by Allison in Dormivigilia

Aussie researchers have linked CART, a transcription factor regulating feeding behavior, to gating cocaine-seeking. Recent evidence showing that other neural factors such as BDNF also gate cocaine (and alcohol) seeking behavior may change the experimental approach of pharmaceutical companies; instead of focusing on modulating neural transmission... Read more »

Morgan H. James, Janine L. Charnley, Emma Jones, Emily M. Levi, Jiann Wei Yeoh, Jamie R. Flynn, Douglas W. Smith, Christopher V. Dayas*. (2010) Cocaine- and Amphetamine-Regulated Transcript (CART) Signaling within the Paraventricular Thalamus Modulates Cocaine-Seeking Behaviour . PLoS ONE. info:/

  • September 28, 2010
  • 07:28 PM
  • 620 views

Bad HABit

by Journal Watch Online in Journal Watch Online

Arrive a month later, and they might have missed it. In late 2008, marine biologists were able to witness first-hand the devastating impact of a massive algal bloom on coral reefs in the Gulf of Oman. The episode may be a picture of things to come, as researchers predict that harmful algal blooms (HABs) will […] Read More »... Read more »

  • September 28, 2010
  • 07:05 PM
  • 1,191 views

Cell culture: Oktoberfest

by Rogue in Into Oblivion

On September 18, the 200th edition of Oktoberfest was kicked off in Munich, Germany. Roasted chicken, weisswurst and tasty bretzels are all around, and of course, the beer! In this edition of Cell Culture, the whole beer journey is presented: from the foamy Mass to tourist’s liver. Michaeleen Doucleff writes a must-read report about it. [...]... Read more »

Doucleff M. (2010) Cell culture: Oktoberfest. Cell. info:/10.1016/j.cell.2010.09.007

  • September 28, 2010
  • 06:38 PM
  • 1,100 views

A Filter for Finding “All Studies on Animal Experimentation in PubMed”

by Laika in Laika's Medliblog

For  an introduction to search filters you can first read this post. Most people searching PubMed try to get rid of publications about animals. But basic scientists and lab animal technicians just want to find those animal studies. PubMed has built-in filters for that: the limits. There is a limit  for “humans” and a limit for “animals”. [...]... Read more »

  • September 28, 2010
  • 06:09 PM
  • 506 views

Citing in 140 characters

by Hadas Shema in Information Culture

Using the Israeli SF&F society's time machine* I managed to get an a advanced copy of Priem and Costello's paper: "How and why scholars cite on Twitter", which will be presented at the ASIST 2010 conference (22-27 October). As one can learn from the paper's name, it deals with researchers' Twitter citing behavior. The snowball sampling here is a bit problematic, as the authors themselves admit in the conclusion part. They started with 3 academics from different disciplines, asked them to tw........ Read more »

Priem, J., & Costello K. L. (2010) How and why scholars cite on Twitter. ASIST, Oct. 22-27, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. info:/

  • September 28, 2010
  • 06:01 PM
  • 1,109 views

Risky decisions – just do it, or not?

by Jan Husdal in husdal.com

Choosing the right supplier is a risky decision. Chose the wrong supplier, and you may face a severe disruption in your supply chain. Chose the right supplier, and all goes well. Hopefully. But is it possible to judge risk objectively? [ ... ]... Read more »

  • September 28, 2010
  • 05:45 PM
  • 397 views

Psycasm - Dark Ideas of Different Colours

by Rift in Psycasm



[Wherein our hero stumbles upon the worlds very first Synesthete, and quiety wishes that he too had super powers...]
This is not the kind of post I normally make, but in doing some research for another subject I came across something that's quite fascinating.
But first, a preamble.
Every first year Psych students becomes familiar with a number of case studies. The most famous is probabl; (read more)

Source: Rift - Discipline: Psychology... Read more »

  • September 28, 2010
  • 05:45 PM
  • 817 views

Featured - Dark Ideas of Different Colours

by Rift in Psycasm



[Wherein our hero stumbles upon the worlds very first Synesthete, and quiety wishes that he too had super powers...]
This is not the kind of post I normally make, but in doing some research for another subject I came across something that's quite fascinating.
But first, a preamble.
Every first year Psych students becomes familiar with a number of case studies. The most famous is probabl; (read more)

Source: Rift - Discipline: Psychology... Read more »

  • September 28, 2010
  • 05:37 PM
  • 1,064 views

K: Japan's Next-Generation Supercomputer

by Olexandr Isayev in olexandrisayev.com

Fujitsu announced that today it began shipping the computing units for Japan's Next-Generation Supercomputer, nicknamed the "K" computer.... Read more »

  • September 28, 2010
  • 05:37 PM
  • 816 views

K: Japan’s Next-Generation Supercomputer

by Olexandr Isayev in olexandrisayev.com

Fujitsu announced that today it began shipping the computing units for Japan's Next-Generation Supercomputer, nicknamed the "K" computer.... Read more »

  • September 28, 2010
  • 05:30 PM
  • 414 views

Minimally-Invasive Laser Surgery

by Michael Long in Phased

Dwayne Miller (University of Toronto, Canada) and coworkers have developed a picosecond infrared laser scalpel that reduces the scarring and adjacent tissue damage seen after conventional surgical incisions. This news feature was written on September 28, 2010.... Read more »

  • September 28, 2010
  • 04:29 PM
  • 550 views

Unexpected findings on medical imaging are usually harmless

by Helen Jaques in In Sickness and In Health

Imagine you go for an MRI or an x ray and the radiologist spots something they didn’t anticipate on your scan – you would be worried, right? Well, maybe you don’t need to be. A study of more than 1,400 scan found that almost 40% showed at least one such “incidental finding” but only 2.5% [...]... Read more »

Orme, N., Fletcher, J., Siddiki, H., Harmsen, W., O'Byrne, M., Port, J., Tremaine, W., Pitot, H., McFarland, E., Robinson, M.... (2010) Incidental Findings in Imaging Research: Evaluating Incidence, Benefit, and Burden. Archives of Internal Medicine, 170(17), 1525-1532. DOI: 10.1001/archinternmed.2010.317  

  • September 28, 2010
  • 03:46 PM
  • 435 views

The impairment of memory consolidation in psychiatric patients

by 神経オタク in Cognitive Convolutions

Genzel L, Ali E, Dresler M, Steiger A, & Tesfaye M (2010). Sleep-dependent memory consolidation of a new task is inhibited in psychiatric patients. Journal of psychiatric research PMID: 20869069Just a little update, since I've been slacking lately.The authors looked at schizophrenic and depressive Ethiopian patients given a sequential finger tapping task (a motor task used often in sleep research... Read more »

  • September 28, 2010
  • 03:30 PM
  • 691 views

Serotonin Modulates Prosocial Behavior via Harm Aversion

by Michael Long in Phased

Molly Crockett (University of Cambridge, United Kingdom) and coworkers present evidence that supports the harm aversion hypothesis, rather than the emotional regulation hypothesis, of serotonin's modulation of prosocial behavior. This news feature was written on September 28, 2010.... Read more »

  • September 28, 2010
  • 02:54 PM
  • 1,035 views

HEAVY METAL SHIELDS FLOWERS FROM DISEASE

by Casey Rentz in Natural Selections


Look out! This little white flower can protect itself...in a major way. Alpine pennycress, a dandelion-looking plant found growing in the dirt next to former mines can absorb metal and use it to shield itself from disease, says a recent study in PLoS Pathogens. Why are we always so surprised to witness a seemingly primitive plant or animal adapting to things in post-industrial human societies? It's their world, too.
Anyway, back to the story--Zinc, nickel, or cadmium, if sucked up in high enoug........ Read more »

Fones H, Davis CA, Rico A, Fang F, Smith JA, & Preston GM. (2010) Metal hyperaccumulation armors plants against disease. PLoS pathogens, 6(9). PMID: 20838462  

  • September 28, 2010
  • 02:18 PM
  • 765 views

Science or sciencey [part 1]

by Daniel Simons in The Invisible Gorilla

The first of a 4-part series examining what happens when science is used for marketing (using brain-training software as the central example). ... Read more »

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