Post List

  • August 19, 2010
  • 06:46 PM
  • 1,165 views

Nemesis meets its, uh, nemesis

by Emma in we are all in the gutter

Interesting fact of the day: examining the fossil record suggests that mass extinctions on Earth occur approximately once every 26 million years (Myr). One possible explanation for this is a companion dwarf star to the Sun on a 26 Myr orbit. Every time is passes by, the theory goes, it messes up the Oort cloud [...]... Read more »

Adrian L. Melott, & Richard K. Bambach. (2010) Nemesis Reconsidered. MNRAS. arXiv: 1007.0437v1

  • August 19, 2010
  • 05:33 PM
  • 965 views

Young evangelicals are greener... but no more liberal

by Tom Rees in Epiphenom

During the last US presidential campaign, there was a flurry of excitement when pundits caught hold of the idea that some young Christian evangelicals might possibly vote for Obama (despite the fact that he is, apparently, a Muslim, or perhaps not even a Christian, or something). This would not be so surprising. After all, there is nothing set in stone about what the political and even moral beliefs of an evangelical should be. There would be nothing in principle to stand in the way of a bit of ........ Read more »

Smith, B., & Johnson, B. (2010) The Liberalization of Young Evangelicals: A Research Note. Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, 49(2), 351-360. DOI: 10.1111/j.1468-5906.2010.01514.x  

  • August 19, 2010
  • 04:32 PM
  • 491 views

About Those Chaco Burials

by teofilo in Gambler's House

In discussing a recent paper using stable-isotope techniques to evaluate subsistence in the Southwest during the Basketmaker period, I mentioned that one of the control samples used for contextual comparisons of the Basketmaker results came from Chaco Canyon great house burials.  I don’t know how on earth the Utah-based researchers managed to get permission to [...]... Read more »

  • August 19, 2010
  • 03:59 PM
  • 934 views

Ethics of Labeling

by Anastasia B in Biofortified

We’ve discussed labeling many times at Biofortified, usually looking at things from a practical perspective, such as in the posts What’s in a label? and Labeling GMOs. I argue that anything that is scientifically proven to be a hazard should be a mandatory label. For example, a label that a product contains nuts is justified by severe allergic reactions, even though the additional label may add to the cost of a product for people who don’t have Continue reading...... Read more »

  • August 19, 2010
  • 02:00 PM
  • 1,014 views

Scientists With Data Agree…A Deepwater Oil Plume Exists in the Gulf

by Dr. M in Deep Sea News

BP want’s to deny the presence of a deepwater oil plume in the Gulf of Mexico.  The very oil plume both predicted by models published in 2003.  The very oil plume that the massive amounts of dispersant injected at depth created to prevent oil from washing ashore.  Even the government wants to deny the existence of any . . . → Read More: Scientists With Data Agree…A Deepwater Oil Plume Exists in the Gulf... Read more »

Richard Camilli, Christopher M. Reddy, Dana R. Yoerger, Benjamin A. S. Van Mooy, Michael V. Jakuba, James C. Kinsey, Cameron P. McIntyre, Sean P. Sylva, & James V. Maloney. (2010) Tracking Hydrocarbon Plume Transport and Biodegradation at Deepwater Horizon. Science. info:/10.1126/science.1195223

  • August 19, 2010
  • 01:29 PM
  • 547 views

Sacrifice on the Serengeti: Life History, Genetic Relatedness, and the Evolution of Menopause

by Eric Michael Johnson in The Primate Diaries

The latest stop in the #PDEx tour is being hosted by Dr. Carin Bondar at her website CarinBondar.com.Imagine you’re on the Serengeti Plateau and your children are hungry. For miles in every direction there’s nothing but dry scrub grass with the occasional flat-topped acacia tree marking the landscape. Your oldest has found a spot to dig for tubers but he and your daughter aren’t strong enough to scrape away the hard, baked earth by themselves. Your husband is tracking a wounded gazelle and........ Read more »

Fox, M., Sear, R., Beise, J., Ragsdale, G., Voland, E., & Knapp, L. (2009) Grandma plays favourites: X-chromosome relatedness and sex-specific childhood mortality. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 277(1681), 567-573. DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2009.1660  

  • August 19, 2010
  • 01:29 PM
  • 549 views

Sacrifice on the Serengeti: Life History, Genetic Relatedness, and the Evolution of Menopause

by Eric Michael Johnson in The Primate Diaries in Exile

The latest stop in the #PDEx tour is being hosted by Dr. Carin Bondar at her website CarinBondar.com.Imagine you’re on the Serengeti Plateau and your children are hungry. For miles in every direction there’s nothing but dry scrub grass with the occasional flat-topped acacia tree marking the landscape. Your oldest has found a spot to dig for tubers but he and your daughter aren’t strong enough to scrape away the hard, baked earth by themselves. Your husband is tracking a wounded gazelle and........ Read more »

Fox, M., Sear, R., Beise, J., Ragsdale, G., Voland, E., & Knapp, L. (2009) Grandma plays favourites: X-chromosome relatedness and sex-specific childhood mortality. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 277(1681), 567-573. DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2009.1660  

  • August 19, 2010
  • 12:33 PM
  • 1,175 views

Marine Snow: dead organisms and poop as manna in the ocean

by Hannah Waters in Culturing Science – biology as relevant to us earthly beings

“When I think of the floor of the deep sea…I see always the steady, unremitting, downward drift of materials from above, flake upon flake, layer upon layer…the most stupendous “snowfall” the earth has ever seen.” -Rachel Carson, The Sea Around … Continue reading →... Read more »

Bochdansky, A., van Aken, H., & Herndl, G. (2010) Role of macroscopic particles in deep-sea oxygen consumption. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 107(18), 8287-8291. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.0913744107  

Boyce, D., Lewis, M., & Worm, B. (2010) Global phytoplankton decline over the past century. Nature, 466(7306), 591-596. DOI: 10.1038/nature09268  

Goldthwait, S., Carlson, C., Henderson, G., & Alldredge, A. (2005) Effects of physical fragmentation on remineralization of marine snow. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 59-65. DOI: 10.3354/meps305059  

WOTTON, R., & MALMQVIST, B. (2001) Feces in Aquatic Ecosystems. BioScience, 51(7), 537. DOI: 10.1641/0006-3568(2001)051[0537:FIAE]2.0.CO;2  

  • August 19, 2010
  • 12:20 PM
  • 864 views

Sacrifice on the Serengeti – A Guest Post by Eric M Johnson

by Dr. Carin Bondar in Dr. Carin Bondar - Biologist With a Twist

I’m so pleased to bring you another installment of Eric’s wonderful writing on his Primate Diaries in Exile blog tour.  Following the recent PepsiGate scandal at SEED Science Blogs Eric has taken his show on the road…and I’m so pleased to be one of his stops along the way!  You can follow other stops on [...]... Read more »

Fox, M., Sear, R., Beise, J., Ragsdale, G., Voland, E., & Knapp, L. (2009) Grandma plays favourites: X-chromosome relatedness and sex-specific childhood mortality. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 277(1681), 567-573. DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2009.1660  

  • August 19, 2010
  • 12:19 PM
  • 830 views

The many (scientific) uses of penguin poop (Part II)

by Sam W in From C to Carnivore

Tracking penguins in time Having established where these awesome, possibly cuddly, penguins are, it is time to turn out attention to their history. This is going to be a relatively short post based on a very short article.   Gentoo penguins (from Encyclopaedia Britannica)  Historical records are limited especially concerning animals in remote habitats. If we [...]... Read more »

Sun L, Xie Z, & Zhao J. (2000) A 3,000-year record of penguin populations. Nature, 407(6806), 858. PMID: 11057656  

  • August 19, 2010
  • 12:00 PM
  • 747 views

After 40 years of research, there may be a reason why Aplysia can learn

by Björn Brembs in bjoern.brembs.blog

I'm currently in sunny southern California for some experiments at UCSD. This is the place where one can find the marine snail Aplysia in its natural habitat. As I've been working with Aplysia for about ten years now, I felt it was about time to see Aplysia in the wild and observe what these animals do when they're not in a tank waiting to be experimented upon. Just this morning, before heading out to UCSD, I went snorkeling in La Jolla Cove in the hope of seeing some specimens........ Read more »

Watkins, A., Goldstein, D., Lee, L., Pepino, C., Tillett, S., Ross, F., Wilder, E., Zachary, V., & Wright, W. (2010) Lobster Attack Induces Sensitization in the Sea Hare, Aplysia californica. Journal of Neuroscience, 30(33), 11028-11031. DOI: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.1317-10.2010  

  • August 19, 2010
  • 11:30 AM
  • 884 views

Cleaning up emissions

by sciencebase in Sciencebase Science Blog

Emissions trading is an economic workaround, a fudge if you will, to reducing one’s pollution levels by buying off the emissions credits of others who are polluting less. Emissions trading (also known as cap and trade) is a market-based approach used to control pollution by providing economic incentives for achieving reductions in the emissions of [...]Cleaning up emissions is a post from: Sciencebase Science Blog
... Read more »

  • August 19, 2010
  • 11:27 AM
  • 1,803 views

Unmasking Eoanthropus dawsoni, The First Englishman

by Krystal D'Costa in Anthropology in Practice

Fellow blogger and Scientope Scicurious played host to the most recent edition of The Giant’s Shoulders, a blog carnival that recognizes folks who use classic science papers in their writing. Sci put together a spectacular collection of posts based on the theme of Fools, Frauds, and Failures, and it’s certainly worth perusing.
I had high hopes for participating in this round of the carnival, but

... Read more »

MacCurdy, G. (1914) The Man of Piltdown. American Anthropologist, 16(2), 331-336. DOI: 10.1525/aa.1914.16.2.02a00110  

  • August 19, 2010
  • 11:00 AM
  • 632 views

Does caffeine help you drink?

by TwoYaks in Gene Flow


It was my brother who told me that drinking coffee while drinking alcohol was a good idea - it would lessen the effects of intoxication. I launched into an ethanol fuelled discussion of how physiologically implausible that sounded to me, but we were celebrating a great occasion, and so I don't think I got much beyond slurring something about cyclic AMP before we instead had some of Arizona's ... Read more »

Ferreira, S., de Mello, M., Pompeia, S., & de Souza-Formigoni, M. (2006) Effects of Energy Drink Ingestion on Alcohol Intoxication. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, 30(4), 598-605. DOI: 10.1111/j.1530-0277.2006.00070.x  

  • August 19, 2010
  • 10:04 AM
  • 475 views

Where did the oil go?

by Sarah Stephen in An ecological oratorio

The recent oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico released, as we have all seen on tv, a lot of oil. Quite how much is a "lot" is a bit of a guess, but roughly 4.9 million barrels, or 784 million litres*. What actually happened to this oil was reviewed recently in an article in Science (Kerr 2010). Only about 0.1% was recovered from beaches and marshes (that´s still an awful lot of oil!). About 17% was siphoned away at the well head, 5% burned off at the surface, and only 3% skimmed off........ Read more »

  • August 19, 2010
  • 09:54 AM
  • 760 views

If You’re Gonna Monitor Employee Vehicles, Do It Right

by Richard Landers in NeoAcademic

A new student by McNall and Stanton in the Journal of Business and Psychology examines electronic monitoring of employee vehicle location.... Read more »

  • August 19, 2010
  • 09:35 AM
  • 485 views

Bicycles are Good For You--Really

by Paul Statt in Paul Statt Communications

Public health law research is necessary, even if so much is proving the obvious, but once you get the numbers, you can hopefully get policy changes. But now it can be told: your bicycle is good for your health, despite its dangers.... Read more »

Johan de Hartog, J., Boogaard, H., Nijland, H., & Hoek, G. (2010) Do the Health Benefits of Cycling Outweigh the Risks?. Environmental Health Perspectives, 118(8), 1109-1116. DOI: 10.1289/ehp.0901747  

  • August 19, 2010
  • 09:25 AM
  • 542 views

Heroic Fungi

by Journal Watch Online in Journal Watch Online

Talk about your historic biodiversity. A polar hut built by famed Antarctic explorer Ernest Shackleton turns out to house an extraordinary array of fungi. The discovery could help conservators preserve the landmark structure, and offers new insights into life on a continent once viewed as barren.
Shackleton and his 15-member British Antarctic Expedition erected the […] Read More »... Read more »

Blanchette, R., Held, B., Arenz, B., Jurgens, J., Baltes, N., Duncan, S., & Farrell, R. (2010) An Antarctic Hot Spot for Fungi at Shackleton's Historic Hut on Cape Royds. Microbial Ecology, 60(1), 29-38. DOI: 10.1007/s00248-010-9664-z  

  • August 19, 2010
  • 09:14 AM
  • 1,157 views

Improved survival with ipilimumab in metastatic melanoma

by Sally Church in Pharma Strategy Blog

The latest New England Journal of Medicine dropped in the mail yesterday afternoon, it has some interesting articles on how palliation plus chemotherapy offers improved survival over chemo alone and a small study on the positive impact of T'ai Chi...... Read more »

Hodi, F., O'Day, S., McDermott, D., Weber, R., Sosman, J., Haanen, J., Gonzalez, R., Robert, C., Schadendorf, D., Hassel, J.... (2010) Improved Survival with Ipilimumab in Patients with Metastatic Melanoma. New England Journal of Medicine. DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1003466  

Hwu, P. (2010) Treating Cancer by Targeting the Immune System. New England Journal of Medicine, 363(8), 779-781. DOI: 10.1056/NEJMe1006416  

  • August 19, 2010
  • 09:06 AM
  • 1,146 views

Scientist Urges "Four Culture" Partnerships on Climate Change Communication

by Matthew C. Nisbet in Age of Engagement

More than 50 years after the publication of CP Snow's seminal Two Cultures, interdisciplinary partnerships between science and other academic "cultures" are being urged once again. Today, urgency is not focused on the Cold War but rather the challenge of engaging society on climate change and other environmental problems.
In an open access article published this month at the journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, I joined with several colleagues to describe the potential for partnersh........ Read more »

Nisbet, M., Hixon, M., Moore, K., & Nelson, M. (2010) Four cultures: new synergies for engaging society on climate change. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, 8(6), 329-331. DOI: 10.1890/1540-9295-8.6.329  

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