Post List

  • November 11, 2009
  • 01:15 AM
  • 1,357 views

‘What do I do when I’ve had enough’: The Effect of Emotions on Self-regulation & Chronic Pain

by Bronwyn Thompson in Healthskills: Skills for Healthy Living


As soon as read the first paragraph of the paper I’ve used as the basis for this post, I knew I was onto something that resonated with my original occupational therapy values. It says this:
‘Living with chronic pain is a balancing act. People with chronic pain are required to make daily decisions [...]... Read more »

Hamilton, N., Karoly, P., & Kitzman, H. (2004) Self-Regulation and Chronic Pain:The Role of Emotion. Cognitive Therapy and Research, 28(5), 559-576. DOI: 10.1023/B:COTR.0000045565.88145.76  

  • November 11, 2009
  • 12:01 AM
  • 647 views

Managing Supply Chain Risk and Vulnerability

by Jan Husdal in husdal.com

Another book by someone from ISCRIM? No, not this time, or perhaps, yes, after all, because several of the ISCRIM members have contributed to the chapters in this book, which is well worth taking a closer look at, particularly if risk modeling and decision-making is your field.... Read more »

  • November 10, 2009
  • 11:58 PM
  • 700 views

The Evolution of Depression

by Shaheen Lakhan in Brain Blogger

Millions of people around the world suffer from depression, the most common mental disorder of all. Since depression appears to be largely genetic, several long-standing questions continue to bedevil researchers. Have the genes for clinical unipolar depression undergone selective evolution–or is depression a random product of mutation, evolutionary drift, or other non-selective forces?
The symptoms of [...]... Read more »

  • November 10, 2009
  • 11:33 PM
  • 928 views

'Cause I said so... The Sufficient-Component Cause model and what it can tell us about cancer screening: Part I

by Ryan in Evidence-Based Public Health

... Read more »

  • November 10, 2009
  • 11:25 PM
  • 896 views

High Octane Dinosaurs

by Anne-Marie Hodge in Endless Forms


The question of whether dinosaurs were endothermic has been a rich source of controversy for decades. Although they were originally portrayed as sluggish reptiles that crept their “cold-blooded” way through the Mesozoic, over time evidence has suggested that they may have actually had active and athletic lifestyles, with fast-running metabolisms to match. Everything from growth rates to diet to integument has been used as evidence that dinosaurs, if not as fully “war........ Read more »

  • November 10, 2009
  • 07:30 PM
  • 920 views

Road Redux

by Journal Watch Online in Journal Watch Online

Ancient Chinese road construction method preserves cliff ecosystems

... Read more »

  • November 10, 2009
  • 05:09 PM
  • 1,365 views

Do chimps understand what Jon Stewart (or another chimp) believes?

by Dave Munger in Cognitive Daily

Take a look at this video from last night's episode of Jon Stewart's "The Daily Show."



If you'd like, you can skip past all the political snark to the 4:47 mark to watch Jon bring cognitive psychology into prime time (or at least latenight cable)! That's right; you saw it: Jon Stewart mentioned the psychological concept of "object permanence" on national TV. Object permanence was introduced by Jean Piaget as a way of measuring the growing cognitive ability of children. Three-month-olds don't ........ Read more »

  • November 10, 2009
  • 05:00 PM
  • 537 views

Arch Intern Med roundup: diets, delays and disclosure

by Helen Jaques in In Sickness and In Health

The journal Archives of Internal Medicine has a several cracking research papers this week.
Low carb dieters are grumpier than those on low fat diets
First up is Brinkworth et al.’s research on the long-term psychological effects of low carbohydrate diets compared with low fat diets.
In this study, 106 overweight and obese individuals were randomly assigned to [...]... Read more »

Brinkworth GD, Buckley JD, Noakes M, Clifton PM, . (2009) Long-term Effects of a Very Low-Carbohydrate Diet and a Low-Fat Diet on Mood and Cognitive Function. Arch Intern Med, 169(20), 1873-1880. info:other/http://archinte.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/short/169/20/1873?home

Horwitz LI . (2009) Percentage of US Emergency Department Patients Seen Within the Recommended Triage Time: 1997 to 2006. Arch Intern Med, 169(20), 1857-1865. info:other/http://archinte.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/short/169/20/1857?home

Chen LM, Farwell WR, . (2009) Primary Care Visit Duration and Quality: Does Good Care Take Longer? . Arch Intern Med, 169(20), 1866-1872. info:other/http://archinte.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/short/169/20/1866?home

López L, Weissman JS, Schneider EC, Weingart SN, Cohen AP, . (2009) Disclosure of Hospital Adverse Events and Its Association With Patients' Ratings of the Quality of Care. Arch Intern Med, 169(20), 1888-1894. info:other/http://archinte.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/abstract/169/20/1888

  • November 10, 2009
  • 04:56 PM
  • 1,688 views

Measuring dino fitness - more evidence that two-legged dinosaurs were warm-blooded

by Ed Yong in Not Exactly Rocket Science

The question of whether dinosaurs were warm-blooded or cold-blooded is one of the most enduring in palaeontology. Did they generate their own body heat like today's mammals; was their temperature more influenced by their environment like today's reptiles; or did they use a mixture of both strategies? Scientists have put forward a slew of arguments for all of these alternatives, but Herman Pontzer from Washington University has a new take on things which suggests that many dinosaurs were indeed w........ Read more »

  • November 10, 2009
  • 03:09 PM
  • 782 views

B:III evidence for evolution (which is just a theory)

by Bjørn Østman in Pleiotropy

Having trouble with your eyes? Well, then, let me have a look at it, because I have read stuff about eyes. I'll be prescribing glasses. Contact lenses don't work, because I don't understand how they can be made, so don't wear those. Got worms in your eyeball? Let me get a knife...... Read more »

William E. Smiddy. (2009) Evolution: Theory, Not Fact. ARCH OPHTHALMOL, 127(11), 1552-1553. info:/

  • November 10, 2009
  • 02:58 PM
  • 1,219 views

New Virtual Issue of Cultural Anthropology on "Security"

by Kevin Karpiak in Anthropoliteia: the anthropology of policing

special online virtual issue of Cultural Anthropology on the topic of "Security"... Read more »

  • November 10, 2009
  • 02:42 PM
  • 861 views

Rapid Synthesis of Ibuprofen in a Microreactor

by Michael Long in Phased

Tyler McQuade (Florida State University, Tallahassee) and coworkers have synthesized a common anti-inflammatory drug in 10 minutes, using a series of adjoining microreactors, in a continuous format. This news feature was written on November 10, 2009.... Read more »

Bogdan AR, Poe SL, Kubis DC, Broadwater SJ, & McQuade DT. (2009) The continuous-flow synthesis of Ibuprofen. Angewandte Chemie (International ed. in English), 48(45), 8547-50. PMID: 19810066  

  • November 10, 2009
  • 01:30 PM
  • 976 views

Influenza virus is infectious for days on banknotes

by Vincent Racaniello in virology blog

Influenza virus may be transmitted among humans in three ways: by direct contact with infected individuals; by contact with contaminated objects (called fomites, such as toys, doorknobs); and by inhalation of virus-laden aerosols. The contribution of each mode to overall transmission of influenza is not known. But something that most of us touch on a daily basis – paper currency – appears to be able to hold infectious virus for a surprisingly long period of time.... Read more »

Thomas Y, Vogel G, Wunderli W, Suter P, Witschi M, Koch D, Tapparel C, & Kaiser L. (2008) Survival of influenza virus on banknotes. Applied and environmental microbiology, 74(10), 3002-7. PMID: 18359825  

  • November 10, 2009
  • 01:13 PM
  • 758 views

Influenza virus is infectious for days on banknotes

by Vincent Racaniello in virology blog

Influenza virus may be transmitted among humans in three ways: by direct contact with infected individuals; by contact with contaminated objects (called fomites, such as toys, doorknobs); and by inhalation of virus-laden aerosols. The contribution of each mode to overall transmission of influenza is not known. But something that most of us touch on a [...]... Read more »

Thomas Y, Vogel G, Wunderli W, Suter P, Witschi M, Koch D, Tapparel C, & Kaiser L. (2008) Survival of influenza virus on banknotes. Applied and environmental microbiology, 74(10), 3002-7. PMID: 18359825  

  • November 10, 2009
  • 12:05 PM
  • 747 views

Ten statisticians every psychologist should know about

by Christian Jarrett in BPS Research Digest

As psychology students past and present will be only too aware, statistics are a key part of every psychology undergrad course and they also appear in nearly every published journal article. And yet have we ever stopped to recognise the statisticians who have brought us these wonderful mathematical tools? As psychologist Daniel Wright puts it: "Statistical techniques are often taught as if they were brought down from some statistical mount only to magically appear in [the software package] SPSS......... Read more »

Daniel B Wright. (2009) Ten Statisticians and Their Impacts for Psychologists. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 4(6), 587-597. info:/

  • November 10, 2009
  • 11:30 AM
  • 643 views

Wiring Up Rugged Bacteria for Biosensing

by Michael Long in Phased

Lo Gorton (Lund University, Sweden) and coworkers have developed a prototype biosensor based on hardy bacteria. This news feature was written on November 10, 2009.... Read more »

Coman, V., Gustavsson, T., Finkelsteinas, A., von Wachenfeldt, C., Hägerhäll, C., & Gorton, L. (2009) Electrical Wiring of Live, Metabolically Enhanced Bacillus subtilis Cells with Flexible Osmium-Redox Polymers. Journal of the American Chemical Society, 131(44), 16171-16176. DOI: 10.1021/ja905442a  

  • November 10, 2009
  • 09:00 AM
  • 1,490 views

Rethinking cancer screening?

by Orac in Respectful Insolence

Here we go again.

I see that the kerfuffle over screening for cancer has erupted again to the point where it's found its way out of the rarified air of specialty journals to general medical journals and hence into the mainstream press. This is something that seems to pop up every so often, much to the consternation of lay people and primary care doctors alike, often trumpeted with breathless headlines along the lines of "What if everything you knew about screening was wrong?

It isn't, but some........ Read more »

Esserman, L., Shieh, Y., & Thompson, I. (2009) Rethinking Screening for Breast Cancer and Prostate Cancer. JAMA: The Journal of the American Medical Association, 302(15), 1685-1692. DOI: 10.1001/jama.2009.1498  

  • November 10, 2009
  • 07:00 AM
  • 721 views

The permeability of the urban landscape to wildlife movement

by Rob Goldstein in Conservation Maven

A new study looks at roads, bridges, train tracks, and rivers as potential barriers to wildlife mobility. The researchers wanted to figure out what factors make these features more or less permeable to the movement of birds...... Read more »

  • November 10, 2009
  • 06:12 AM
  • 803 views

Adaptations for the visual assessment of formidability: Part I

by Michael Meadon in Ionian Enchantment

In the last couple of years there has been an explosion in research on faces and what can be inferred from them. It turns out, for example, that you can predict electoral outcomes from rapid and unreflective facial judgments, that women can (partially) determine a man's level of interest in infants from his face alone, that the facial expression of fear enhances sensory acquisition, and much, much else. A particularly interesting addition to this literature is Aaron Sell et. al.'s pape........ Read more »

Sell, A., Cosmides, L., Tooby, J., Sznycer, D., von Rueden, C., & Gurven, M. (2009) Human adaptations for the visual assessment of strength and fighting ability from the body and face. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 276(1656), 575-584. DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2008.1177  

  • November 10, 2009
  • 05:30 AM
  • 582 views

Big Milk farms out PhDs to do their dirty work.

by Yoni Freedhoff in Weighty Matters

Big Milk's onslaught of advertisements designed to look like newspaper articles continued last week with this full page feature in Canwest papers.I'm sure the Dairy Farmers of Canada were thrilled with Dr. Brian Roy, director of the Centre for Muscle Metabolism and Biophysics at Brock University, who happily perpetuated a dairy myth - that it magically helps with weight loss. Dr. Roy was quoted as saying, "While it may seem surprising, milk can even help people lose weight. Studies report calci........ Read more »

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