Post List

  • September 23, 2010
  • 10:29 PM
  • 1,048 views

A Taste For Trash

by Journal Watch Online in Journal Watch Online

The Glaucous Gull ain’t no gourmet—and that could be bad news for endangered Alaskan birds. A taste for human garbage may fueling an increase in the population of the Arctic’s largest gull, which is also a voracious predator. The trash-based food chain could end up imperiling more than a dozen species, concludes a new study. […] Read More »... Read more »

  • September 23, 2010
  • 10:09 PM
  • 2,011 views

A new type of enveloped virus?

by Vincent Racaniello in virology blog

All known virus particles can be placed into one of two general categories: enveloped or non-enveloped. Viruses that fall into the former category are characterized by a lipid membrane derived from the host cell, and one or more nuclecapsid proteins that interact with the viral genome. A virus that infects an archaeal host may constitute [...]... Read more »

  • September 23, 2010
  • 08:05 PM
  • 937 views

Simple rules for inclusive fitness

by Razib Khan in Gene Expression

With the recent huge furor over the utility of kin selection I’ve been keeping a closer eye on the literature on inclusive fitness. The reason W. D. Hamilton’s original papers in The Journal of Theoretical Biology are highly cited is not some conspiracy, rather, they’re a powerful framework in which one can understand the evolution [...]... Read more »

  • September 23, 2010
  • 06:16 PM
  • 1,149 views

Holy Mola Batman!

by Dr. Carin Bondar in Dr. Carin Bondar - Biologist With a Twist

Who needs a research question when you’ve got a super-sexy beast to play with??


Upon perusal of the recent offerings of one of my favorite journals, an article immediately caught my eye: Satellite tracking of giant sunfish! I read the abstract, and despite the fact that the research didn’t appear to have any clear biological [...]... Read more »

Dewar, H., Thys, T., Teo, S., Farwell, C., O'Sullivan, J., Tobayama, T., Soichi, M., Nakatsubo, T., Kondo, Y., & Okada, Y. (2010) Satellite tracking the world's largest jelly predator, the ocean sunfish, Mola mola, in the Western Pacific. Journal of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology, 393(1-2), 32-42. DOI: 10.1016/j.jembe.2010.06.023  

  • September 23, 2010
  • 06:08 PM
  • 907 views

Psycasm - Why you're right enough for it to work, but business still gets it wrong...

by Rift in Psycasm


In my last post [here] all were invited to make judgements about my personality variables based only on a photo of my head and shoulders, and (implicitly) the post associated with it.
It had been suggested by Neumann and colleagues (200) that people can accurately do this - according to their methodology. While my post was a far cry from lab conditions people still made predictions, which is inte; (read more)

Source: Rift - Discipline: Psychology... Read more »

  • September 23, 2010
  • 06:02 PM
  • 1,232 views

Logistics risks – the new science?

by Jan Husdal in husdal.com

This paper presents the five cornerstones of logistics as an academic discipline, and shows how logistics in fact can act as an integrative platform over a wide range of different issues at the micro meso and macro level. [ ... ]... Read more »

  • September 23, 2010
  • 02:20 PM
  • 1,294 views

Everything you wanted to know about how whale sharks feed

by Alistair Dove in Deep Type Flow


I’m really excited about a new paper that’s finally out about how whale sharks feed, from the way their filter pads are built to what they eat and how much.  I’m not an author on the paper but I’ve been a witness to a lot of the work and its terrific to see it come to fruition.  So who’s it by and what’s it about?
Phil Motta is the senior author, with 11 co-authors from Georgia Aquarium, Mote marine lab, Project DOMINO and the University of Cal........ Read more »

  • September 23, 2010
  • 01:56 PM
  • 1,148 views

Reflections on the WEIRD Evolution of Human Psychology

by Eric Michael Johnson in The Primate Diaries

The latest stop in the #PDEx tour is being hosted by PLoS Blogs:What happens if researchers inadvertently fall prey to confirmation bias at a societal level?Addressing this question Canadian psychologists Joseph Henrich, Steven J. Heine and Ara Norenzayan at the University of British Columbia (where I am also located) recently published a paper in the journal Behavioral Brain Sciences. Their research documents how most of the studies that psychologists claim show human universals are really just........ Read more »

Henrich, J., Heine, S., & Norenzayan, A. (2010) The weirdest people in the world?. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 33(2-3), 61-83. DOI: 10.1017/S0140525X0999152X  

  • September 23, 2010
  • 01:56 PM
  • 920 views

Reflections on the WEIRD Evolution of Human Psychology

by Eric Michael Johnson in The Primate Diaries in Exile

The latest stop in the #PDEx tour is being hosted by PLoS Blogs:What happens if researchers inadvertently fall prey to confirmation bias at a societal level?Addressing this question Canadian psychologists Joseph Henrich, Steven J. Heine and Ara Norenzayan at the University of British Columbia (where I am also located) recently published a paper in the journal Behavioral Brain Sciences. Their research documents how most of the studies that psychologists claim show human universals are really just........ Read more »

Henrich, J., Heine, S., & Norenzayan, A. (2010) The weirdest people in the world?. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 33(2-3), 61-83. DOI: 10.1017/S0140525X0999152X  

  • September 23, 2010
  • 12:26 PM
  • 1,231 views

Promoting Health: Interval vs Steady Running vs Strength Training

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

The optimum physical exercise regimen for promoting health is a key public health issue.  Aerobic exercise can be obtained via running either using a steady pace or an interval-based approach.  Interval approaches typically includes high intensity exercise over shorter bursts of time.  Additionally, strength training provides a variety of health benefits and it’s role compared to aerobic exercise is unclear.A Danish study was designed and recently published to compare the health........ Read more »

Nybo L, Sundstrup E, Jakobsen MD, Mohr M, Hornstrup T, Simonsen L, Bülow J, Randers MB, Nielsen JJ, Aagaard P.... (2010) High-Intensity Training Vs. Traditional Exercise Interventions for Promoting Health. Medicine and science in sports and exercise. PMID: 20195181  

  • September 23, 2010
  • 12:00 PM
  • 924 views

Komodo Dragon - Largest Lizard in the world

by beredim in Strange Animals

Komodo dragons are known for being the world's largest species of lizard. The post contains extensive info, images, videos and interesting facts about these terrifying predators.... Read more »

Lutz, Richard L. (1992) Komodo, the living dragon. Choice Reviews Online, 29(06), 29-29. DOI: 10.5860/CHOICE.29-3309  

Collar DC, Schulte JA 2nd, & Losos JB. (2011) Evolution of extreme body size disparity in monitor lizards (Varanus). Evolution; international journal of organic evolution, 65(9), 2664-80. PMID: 21884063  

Montgomery JM, Gillespie D, Sastrawan P, Fredeking TM, & Stewart GL. (2002) Aerobic salivary bacteria in wild and captive Komodo dragons. Journal of wildlife diseases, 38(3), 545-51. PMID: 12238371  

Watts, P., Buley, K., Sanderson, S., Boardman, W., Ciofi, C., & Gibson, R. (2006) Parthenogenesis in Komodo dragons. Nature, 444(7122), 1021-1022. DOI: 10.1038/4441021a  

  • September 23, 2010
  • 11:56 AM
  • 1,857 views

Origins of Morality: Puppet-Show Style!

by Jason Goldman in The Thoughtful Animal

Morality and convention are so mired in culture that it may seem near impossible to determine the extent to which biology and environment give rise to it. And yet it is possible to investigate the evolutionary origins of morality. Research with infants - especially pre-verbal infants - who have not yet been sufficiently exposed to most cultural institutions, can provide an opportunity to determine what the evolutionary and developmental building blocks are for complex moral reasoning.

Human ad........ Read more »

Hamlin JK, Wynn K, & Bloom P. (2007) Social evaluation by preverbal infants. Nature, 450(7169), 557-9. PMID: 18033298  

  • September 23, 2010
  • 11:55 AM
  • 1,373 views

Dangerous dependence on virtual water deepens

by Maria José Viñas in GeoSpace


The rate of global groundwater depletion has been on the rise, warning of a potential disaster for an increasingly globalized agricultural system says Marc Bierkens of Utrecht University in Utrecht, the Netherlands.
In an upcoming study, Bierkens and his colleagues find that not only is global groundwater extraction outstripping its natural recharge rate, this disparity has [...]... Read more »

Paolo D’Odorico, Francesco Laio, and Luca Ridolfi. (2010) Does globalization of water reduce societal resilience to drought?. Geophysical Research Letters. info:/10.1029/2010GL043167

Marc.F.P. Bierkens et al. (2010) A worldwide view of groundwater depletion. Geophysical Research Letters. info:/10.1029/2010GL044571

  • September 23, 2010
  • 11:35 AM
  • 450 views

Can Orangutans Survive in Paper Plantations?

by Michael Long in Phased

Erik Meijaard (People and Nature Consulting International, and Australian National University) and coworkers have asked whether paper plantations can provide valuable habitat for orangutan conservation. This news feature was written on September 23, 2010.... Read more »

  • September 23, 2010
  • 10:48 AM
  • 663 views

How Still Images Can Evoke the Sensation of Movement

by Psychology 379 bloggers in Cognition & the Arts

Examine the two abstract paintings presented above.  To the right is Marcel Duchamp’s Nude Descending a Staircase No. 2, and to the left is Piet Mondrian’s Gray Tree.  Which one more strongly conveys a sense of movement? According to experiments conducted by Chai-Youn Kim and Randolph Blake, most observers would agree that the Duchamp piece is a [...]... Read more »

  • September 23, 2010
  • 10:38 AM
  • 1,345 views

Negative Evidence: Still Missing after all these Years

by gameswithwords in Games with Words

My pen-pal Melodye has posted a thought-provoking piece at Child's Play on negative evidence. As she rightly points out, issues of negative evidence have played a crucial role in the development of theories of language acquisition. But she doesn't think that's a good thing. Rather, it's "ridiculous, [sic] and belies a complete lack of understanding of basic human learning mechanisms."
The argument over negative evidence, as presented by Melodye, is ridiculous, but that seems to stem from (a) con........ Read more »

  • September 23, 2010
  • 08:00 AM
  • 1,167 views

Psychological obstacles to recovery in back pain: A rumble in the journal

by Lorimer Moseley in BodyInMind

I’m a little late to this one but an interesting disagreement recently emerged in the letters to the editor in the journal Pain. This focused around a recent study from the impressive Arthritis Research Campaign National Primary Care at Keele University, UK into the psychological obstacles to recovery from low back pain. The study looked [...]... Read more »

Foster, N., Dunn, K., Bishop, A., & Main, C. (2010) Response to letter by Roelofs et al. Pain, 150(1), 208-209. DOI: 10.1016/j.pain.2010.04.015  

  • September 23, 2010
  • 08:00 AM
  • 1,333 views

A whole new type of flower porn

by Zen Faulkes in NeuroDojo

Okay, so males in search of sex are not always that discriminating. We’ve seen that males that mate with females that will kill and eat them. We’ve seen males that will court other males. But not recognizing that something doesn’t even belong to your own kingdom is close to the record, and we saw that with some male insects that copulate with flowers.*

Previously, only orchids were known to trick insects into copulating with them. It’s thought that this is a way to enhance pollination........ Read more »

  • September 23, 2010
  • 08:00 AM
  • 1,703 views

America’s ever-expanding meal portions

by Melinda Moyer in Body Politic

A hamburger today is a lot more than it used to be.... Read more »

  • September 23, 2010
  • 07:39 AM
  • 733 views

RNA hairpins that trigger cancer cell death

by Becky in It Takes 30

One of the central problems of cancer is that cancer cells look an awful lot like normal cells.  It’s easy to kill cancer cells; the hard part is to kill them while not killing (too many of) the cells that the patient would like to keep.  All kinds of ways of distinguishing between cancer cells [...]... Read more »

Venkataraman S, Dirks RM, Ueda CT, & Pierce NA. (2010) Selective cell death mediated by small conditional RNAs. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. PMID: 20823260  

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