Post List

  • November 11, 2009
  • 06:46 PM
  • 2,071 views

Impacts, Ocean Mixing, Iron, and Life

by CM in The Iapetus Beat

Banded Iron Formation near Timmons in Northern Ontario; 2.7 billion years old.  From Laurentian University.

John Slack and William Cannon, two USGS geologists based in Reston, Virginia, have a paper in this month’s Geology that suggests a link between a major asteroid impact and the cessation of banded iron deposition 1.85 billion years ago. Scientists love to correlate impacts with major geological events. We’ve recently seen research suggesting an extraterrestrial impact or i........ Read more »

  • November 11, 2009
  • 06:12 PM
  • 931 views

Constancy of the discodermolide hairpin motif

by The Curious Wavefunction in The Curious Wavefunction

Our paper on the conformational analysis of discodermolide is now up on the ACS website. The following is a brief description of the work.Discodermolide (DDM) is a well-known highly flexible polyketide that is the most potent microtubule polymerization agent known. In this capacity it functions very similar to taxol and the epothilones. However the binding mode of DDM will intimately depend on its conformations in solution. To this end we have performed multiple force field conformational search........ Read more »

Jogalekar, A., Kriel, F., Shi, Q., Cornett, B., Cicero, D., & Snyder, J. (2009) The Discodermolide Hairpin Structure Flows from Conformationally Stable Modular Motifs. Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, 2147483647. DOI: 10.1021/jm9015284  

  • November 11, 2009
  • 06:12 PM
  • 831 views

Constancy of the discodermolide hairpin motif

by The Curious Wavefunction in The Curious Wavefunction

Our paper on the conformational analysis of discodermolide is now up on the ACS website. The following is a brief description of the work.Discodermolide (DDM) is a well-known highly flexible polyketide that is the most potent microtubule polymerization agent known. In this capacity it functions very similar to taxol and the epothilones. However the binding mode of DDM will intimately depend on its conformations in solution. To this end we have performed multiple force field conformational search........ Read more »

Jogalekar, A., Kriel, F., Shi, Q., Cornett, B., Cicero, D., & Snyder, J. (2009) The Discodermolide Hairpin Structure Flows from Conformationally Stable Modular Motifs. Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, 2147483647. DOI: 10.1021/jm9015284  

  • November 11, 2009
  • 04:43 PM
  • 1,684 views

Does Progesterone Treatment Prevent Preterm Birth? A Case of “Skim Milk Masquerades as Cream”

by Henci Goer in Science & Sensibility

This is off my usual beat, but a relative asked me to investigate progesterone treatment to prevent preterm birth. In her first pregnancy, membranes ruptured at 31 weeks and the baby was born a week later. (The baby was fine thanks to her mother taking good care of herself in pregnancy, steroids to mature her [...]... Read more »

Dodd JM, Flenady V, Cincotta R, & Crowther CA. (2006) Prenatal administration of progesterone for preventing preterm birth. Cochrane database of systematic reviews (Online). PMID: 16437505  

  • November 11, 2009
  • 04:35 PM
  • 787 views

Pneumonia is world’s biggest childhood killer

by geekheartsscience in geek!

Pneumonia is an acute respiratory infection of the lungs caused by viruses, bacteria and fungi. Despite pneumonia being treatable and preventable, estimates suggest that over 2 million children die every year from pneumonia, making it the leading cause of childhood death worldwide.
On the 2nd November the World Health Organisation and the United Nations Children’s Fund [...]... Read more »

  • November 11, 2009
  • 03:12 PM
  • 534 views

The Public vs Researchers: Thoughts on Nanomaterial Regulations

by Jon Klar in The Enlightenment 2.0


Well it seems that public opinion is once again at odds with that of the scientific community.  What a surprise.
This episode is about the emergence of nanotechnology and how quickly its advances should be thrown to the public.  The public, it seems, would like these new nano-products to become available to them as [...]... Read more »

  • November 11, 2009
  • 02:19 PM
  • 922 views

"Voodoo" Comments - Relevance Beyond fMRI Studies

by Daniel Hawes in Ingenious Monkey | 20-two-5

Despite the lively debate surrounding Vul's notorious "Voodoo"-Study, I feel that there is still some need for thorough blog treatment of the commentaries accompanying Vul’s paper...here's to address this issue...... Read more »

  • November 11, 2009
  • 01:50 PM
  • 757 views

You smell like chicken (to a mosquito)

by Zen Faulkes in NeuroDojo

Although swine flu is the virus of the year, there are plenty of other viruses out there, like West Nile virus. This new paper looks at the interplay between the virus, birds, humans, and the sensory systems of mosquitoes.... Read more »

  • November 11, 2009
  • 12:00 PM
  • 1,889 views

The amazing disappearing asymmetric magnetic reversals

by Chris Rowan in Highly Allochthonous



Interpreting the record of the Earth's magnetic field preserved in rocks - palaeomagnetism - is a complicated business, but at the heart of it is one very simple assumption: except when it is reversing, if you average over a few thousand years or so, the geomagnetic field resembles a dipole aligned with the Earth's geographic poles.



This relatively uncomplicated shape means that there is a very simple relationship between latitude and the magnetic inclination (the angle magnetic field lines........ Read more »

  • November 11, 2009
  • 11:02 AM
  • 1,599 views

The third trochanter and gluteus maximus of Ardipithecus

by zinjanthropus in A Primate of Modern Aspect

The femur can be an extremely informative bone when reconstructing the locomotor behaviors of fossil primates. The head and neck are particularly informative. The morphology of the head can tell you how flexible the hip joint is. If you can get a good CT scan, the distribution of cortical bone at the [...]... Read more »

  • November 11, 2009
  • 10:55 AM
  • 706 views

Towards Shutting Out and Destroying HIV

by Michael Long in Phased

David Spiegel (Yale University) and coworkers have designed a small molecule that prevents HIV from entering cells, and recruits common antibodies to destroy the virus. This news feature was written on November 11, 2009.... Read more »

Parker, C. G., Domaoal, R. A., Anderson, K. S., & Spiegel, D. A. (2009) An Antibody-Recruiting Small Molecule That Targets HIV gp120. Journal of the American Chemical Society, 131(45), 16392-16394. DOI: 10.1021/ja9057647  

  • November 11, 2009
  • 08:33 AM
  • 527 views

Ecosytem Engineering and Fire Ecology, Part 3

by Johnny in Ecographica

The closing paragraph of ‘Nature, Red in Tooth and Flame Part-2’ mentioned how extrinsic factors in the environment, such as the presence of increased atmospheric oxygen and an abundance of herbaceous plants to serve as fuel, collectively worked to generate frequent and intense wildfires during the Pennsylvanian Period approximately 300 million years ago. It was the presence of these Carboniferous wildfires that positively selected fire-tolerant gymnosperm species for continued devel........ Read more »

  • November 11, 2009
  • 08:00 AM
  • 1,157 views

The fate of freshwater mussels in a suburbanizing landscape

by Rob Goldstein in Conservation Maven

The fate of threatened mussels in the southeastern United States illustrates the potential problems that suburbanization of rural landscapes can cause to freshwater ecosystems. Of the roughly 250 species of mussels historically found in the Southeast, scientists believe that 75% are either extinct or highly threatened.

A new study in the journal Hydrobiologia finds evidence that suburban development may be at least partly to be blame.... Read more »

  • November 11, 2009
  • 05:30 AM
  • 1,035 views

Shocking new study on how TV causes pediatric obesity.

by Yoni Freedhoff in Weighty Matters

Ok, maybe not so shocking.In my talks on childhood obesity I'll always point out that the simple act of sitting on a sofa doesn't in and of itself cause weight gain and on my blog I'll also regularly point out that the rise in childhood obesity isn't a consequence of a lack of physical activity, but rather an increase in food. Putting those two together I've always presumed that TV watching was symptomatic of a less healthy lifestyle that included more calories than the lifestyles of kids who d........ Read more »

Manios, Y., Kourlaba, G., Kondaki, K., Grammatikaki, E., Anastasiadou, A., & Roma-Giannikou, E. (2009) Obesity and Television Watching in Preschoolers in Greece: The GENESIS Study. Obesity, 17(11), 2047-2053. DOI: 10.1038/oby.2009.50  

  • November 11, 2009
  • 05:22 AM
  • 737 views

Do newborns learn language or do they show musical skill?

by Henkjan Honing in Music Matters

This week an interesting study appeared in Current Biology. The research suggests that newborns don’t just cry randomly, but that - when studying the audio signal of their crying - one can distinguish French crying from German crying babies. The German babies - only three days old - cry in a downward fashion, their French contemporaries showed an increasing swelling of the cry and stop abruptly (click on figure for two typical examples).Babies do hear about three months before they are born. T........ Read more »

Mampe, B., Friederici, A., Christophe, A., & Wermke, K. (2009) Newborns' Cry Melody Is Shaped by Their Native Language. Current Biology. DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2009.09.064  

  • November 11, 2009
  • 01:15 AM
  • 1,439 views

‘What do I do when I’ve had enough’: The Effect of Emotions on Self-regulation & Chronic Pain

by Bronwyn Thompson in Healthskills: Skills for Healthy Living


As soon as read the first paragraph of the paper I’ve used as the basis for this post, I knew I was onto something that resonated with my original occupational therapy values. It says this:
‘Living with chronic pain is a balancing act. People with chronic pain are required to make daily decisions [...]... Read more »

Hamilton, N., Karoly, P., & Kitzman, H. (2004) Self-Regulation and Chronic Pain:The Role of Emotion. Cognitive Therapy and Research, 28(5), 559-576. DOI: 10.1023/B:COTR.0000045565.88145.76  

  • November 11, 2009
  • 12:01 AM
  • 705 views

Managing Supply Chain Risk and Vulnerability

by Jan Husdal in husdal.com

Another book by someone from ISCRIM? No, not this time, or perhaps, yes, after all, because several of the ISCRIM members have contributed to the chapters in this book, which is well worth taking a closer look at, particularly if risk modeling and decision-making is your field.... Read more »

  • November 10, 2009
  • 11:58 PM
  • 757 views

The Evolution of Depression

by Shaheen Lakhan in Brain Blogger

Millions of people around the world suffer from depression, the most common mental disorder of all. Since depression appears to be largely genetic, several long-standing questions continue to bedevil researchers. Have the genes for clinical unipolar depression undergone selective evolution–or is depression a random product of mutation, evolutionary drift, or other non-selective forces?
The symptoms of [...]... Read more »

  • November 10, 2009
  • 11:33 PM
  • 1,012 views

'Cause I said so... The Sufficient-Component Cause model and what it can tell us about cancer screening: Part I

by Ryan in Evidence-Based Public Health

... Read more »

  • November 10, 2009
  • 11:25 PM
  • 983 views

High Octane Dinosaurs

by Anne-Marie Hodge in Endless Forms


The question of whether dinosaurs were endothermic has been a rich source of controversy for decades. Although they were originally portrayed as sluggish reptiles that crept their “cold-blooded” way through the Mesozoic, over time evidence has suggested that they may have actually had active and athletic lifestyles, with fast-running metabolisms to match. Everything from growth rates to diet to integument has been used as evidence that dinosaurs, if not as fully “war........ Read more »

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