Post List

  • June 10, 2009
  • 01:26 AM
  • 1,216 views

Hamburgers are pathological

by Iddo Friedberg in Byte Size Biology

From Annals of Diagnostic Pathology. This is what happens when you bring a pathologist to a fast food joint. Hat tip to Laura for pointing this out.

Here were my initial thoughts about these findings. “Bleaaachhhh!” (I’m very verbal when reading scientific papers).

Well, it looks bad.. but. But. Cooked ground beef can have up to 60% [...]... Read more »

PRAYSON, B., MCMAHON, J., & PRAYSON, R. (2008) Fast food hamburgers: what are we really eating?. Annals of Diagnostic Pathology, 12(6), 406-409. DOI: 10.1016/j.anndiagpath.2008.06.002  

  • June 10, 2009
  • 12:00 AM
  • 776 views

Ten Common Causes of Child Trauma Due to Violence

by Catherine Busch in Child Psych

I started this post several weeks ago to answer the question "What are the most common causes of child trauma?" It was much harder than I expected. The task of reviewing statistics wasn't just comparing apples to oranges. It was, instead, like comparing the ingredients of a fruit salad. The statistics varied greatly, in part, due to differences in research design:

* Some studies reported how many children experienced traumatic events in one year while others reported lifetime experience (........ Read more »

  • June 9, 2009
  • 05:32 PM
  • 1,283 views

Your Inner Robot

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic

Have you ever stepped onto a stopped escalator? If so, you'll probably have experienced a strange sensation - a rather unique kind of giddy, whole-body jolt - and you may well have stumbled clumsily for a second or so.But why? And why is it that the phenomenon happens even if you've seen and understood that the escalator is stopped? (This has happened to me, more than once. It's rather disturbing.)This is the question that prompted Fukui et al, a team of Japanese psychologists, to write a paper ........ Read more »

  • June 9, 2009
  • 04:45 PM
  • 991 views

Bendable Crystals

by Steve W in Bridgehead Carbons

Crystals are generally rigid and brittle, but this paper describes microcrystals of dimethylamino trans azobenzene that bend into a semicircle when a light is shined on them. That the azobenzene molecule responds to light is no real surprize, but the fact that the whole crystal changes shape, and reversibly to boot, was pretty cool.Take a look at the video's of this that are provided, for free, in the supplemental information for the paper. The movie 002 shows the bending motion most clearly. ........ Read more »

Koshima, H., Ojima, N., & Uchimoto, H. (2009) Mechanical Motion of Azobenzene Crystals upon Photoirradiation. Journal of the American Chemical Society, 131(20), 6890-6891. DOI: 10.1021/ja8098596  

  • June 9, 2009
  • 04:33 PM
  • 998 views

What is disease? Diabetes, diagnosis, and real science

by PalMD in White Coat Underground

One of the concepts we often discuss around here is "what is disease?" As we've seen in the discussion of Lyme disease and so-called Morgellons syndrome, this is not always an easy question to answer. Knowing what states are disease states does not always yield a black-or-white answer. The first step is usually to define what a disease is. The next problem is to decide who in fact has that disease. The first question is hard enough, especially in disease states that we don't understand too ........ Read more »

  • June 9, 2009
  • 03:52 PM
  • 892 views

Why Theos wants us all to think more about death

by Tom Rees in Epiphenom

Theos is an evangelical advocacy group based in the UK. Their latest survey was on how much time British people spend thinking about death, and their conclusion was that we don't talk about death nearly enough. Now, there are some interesting findings in the survey, as the British Humanist Association points out.But a more salient question is why Theos wants to get us all to talk about death more? Why encourage people to think about death, when they seem perfectly happy (happier, even) not thin........ Read more »

Norenzayan, A. (2006) Belief in Supernatural Agents in the Face of Death. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 32(2), 174-187. DOI: 10.1177/0146167205280251  

  • June 9, 2009
  • 03:27 PM
  • 1,549 views

What is disease? Diabetes, diagnosis, and real science

by Peter Lipson in Science-Based Medicine

One of the concepts we often discuss around here is “what is disease?” As we’ve seen in the discussion of Lyme disease and so-called Morgellons syndrome, this is not always an easy question to answer. Knowing what states are disease states does not always yield a black-or-white answer. The first step is [...]... Read more »

  • June 9, 2009
  • 03:00 PM
  • 801 views

Expedient Synthesis of ortho-Fluorinated Arenes

by Michael Long in Phased

Jin-Quan Yu (Scripps Research Institute, California)

and coworkers have developed an improved synthetic protocol

for a class of molecules that are finding much use in

modern pharmaceuticals, but are typically challenging to synthesize.

This news feature was written on June 9, 2009.... Read more »

Wang, X., Mei, T.-S., & Yu, J.-Q. (2009) Versatile Pd(OTf)2·2H2O-Catalyzed ortho-Fluorination Using NMP as a Promoter. Journal of the American Chemical Society, 131(22), 7520-7521. DOI: 10.1021/ja901352k  

  • June 9, 2009
  • 12:16 PM
  • 1,596 views

Influenza virus in the toilet

by Vincent Racaniello in virology blog

While perusing the cleaning items at the supermarket last night, I spotted the words ‘Kills Flu Virus’ on a bottle of toilet bowl cleaner. Do toilets play a role in transmission of influenza?

Influenza is an infection of the respiratory tract. The virus enters the tract in aerosols or by contact with saliva or other respiratory [...]... Read more »

  • June 9, 2009
  • 12:11 PM
  • 874 views

Nobody knows what behaviour is

by Zen Faulkes in NeuroDojo

The question seems easy. “What is behaviour?”A new paper suggests that this question is fiendishly difficult.I often tell people, “Behaviour is movement.” I actually don’t think that is an all encompassing definition, but it turns out to be a simple one that gives you a lot of mileage. So I freely admit my definition is quick and dirty and incomplete, but Levitas and colleagues crave something more... well, definitive.Levitas and colleagues took a straightforward approach. First, they ........ Read more »

  • June 9, 2009
  • 12:00 PM
  • 820 views

Brain Food: Berries and Greens! (Part 2)

by Christie Wilcox in Nutrition Wonderland

This article is the 2nd part of a 2 part series about Brain Food. You might also find our first installment on Nuts helpful in understanding the Brain Food connection.... Read more »

Maher, P., Akaishi, T., & Abe, K. (2006) Flavonoid fisetin promotes ERK-dependent long-term potentiation and enhances memory. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 103(44), 16568-16573. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.0607822103  

Murray-Kolb LE, & Beard JL. (2007) Iron treatment normalizes cognitive functioning in young women. The American journal of clinical nutrition, 85(3), 778-87. PMID: 17344500  

  • June 9, 2009
  • 10:20 AM
  • 1,460 views

1001 Genomes: plant researchers raise by 1

by Mary in OpenHelix

There is plenty of buzz out there for the big data biology projects–but usually the focus is the human data (with a few token model organisms thrown in).  But this week plant researchers renewed the call for big plant data.  I’m totally on board with that.

The 1000 Genomes project to obtain more human variation information [...]... Read more »

Clark, R., Schweikert, G., Toomajian, C., Ossowski, S., Zeller, G., Shinn, P., Warthmann, N., Hu, T., Fu, G., Hinds, D.... (2007) Common Sequence Polymorphisms Shaping Genetic Diversity in Arabidopsis thaliana. Science, 317(5836), 338-342. DOI: 10.1126/science.1138632  

Ossowski, S., Schneeberger, K., Clark, R., Lanz, C., Warthmann, N., & Weigel, D. (2008) Sequencing of natural strains of Arabidopsis thaliana with short reads. Genome Research, 18(12), 2024-2033. DOI: 10.1101/gr.080200.108  

  • June 9, 2009
  • 09:22 AM
  • 1,804 views

Celexa (citalopram) and autism: Still searching for effective medication management.

by Nestor Lopez-Duran PhD in Child-Psych

While the FDA has not approved any medications for the treatment of autism, physicians commonly prescribe a variety of drugs for the management of specific severe symptoms that have not responded to other treatments, such as repetitive self-injurious behaviors. The selection of which medications may be effective for each behavior is made on largely theoretical [...]... Read more »

  • June 9, 2009
  • 07:21 AM
  • 1,372 views

Abilify for Depression: Patients Give it an Oh-For-Three

by CL Psych in Clinical Psychology & Psychiatry

Abilify for depression: you've seen the ads. You've hopefully read this blog (1, 2) and the excellent series in the LA Times from Melissa Healy. The advantage over placebo is nothing to get particularly excited about. Especially from the patients' point of view. As I have mentioned previously, the two studies that were touted by key opinion leaders are supporting the efficacy of Abilify for depression suffered from a number of problems. Most germane to this post, the patient self-report rat........ Read more »

Robert M. Berman, Maurizio Fava, Michael E. Thase, Madhukar H. Trivedi, René Swanink, Robert D. McQuade, William H. Carson, David Adson, Leslie Taylor, James Hazel.... (2009) Aripiprazole Augmentation in Major Depressive Disorder: A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study in Patients with Inadequate Response to Antidepressants. CNS Spectrums, 14(4), 197-206.

  • June 9, 2009
  • 06:54 AM
  • 968 views

The anti-question, or when bias can be a good thing

by The Curious Wavefunction in The Curious Wavefunction

A recent publication indicates that more bias in the form of natural product scaffolds not yet synthesized could improve hit rates in screeningMost drug discovery projects are inaugurated by some kind of screening campaigns where millions of molecules are screened against a biological target. Even though the hit rate from High-Throughout Screening (HTS) can be quite low, HTS still provides one of the best starting points to discover interesting new structures that display biological activity. In........ Read more »

Hert, J., Irwin, J., Laggner, C., Keiser, M., & Shoichet, B. (2009) Quantifying biogenic bias in screening libraries. Nature Chemical Biology. DOI: 10.1038/nchembio.180  

  • June 9, 2009
  • 06:42 AM
  • 2,156 views

the science of confirmation bias

by Greg Fish in weird things

In one of Terry Pratchett’s sarcastic allegories, The Truth, the ruler of a vast and powerful city state wondering why in the world anyone needs to start a newspaper, astutely notes that people don’t want to hear something really new and able to upset their worldview. Instead of “news,” he says, people really want “olds,” [...]... Read more »

  • June 9, 2009
  • 05:51 AM
  • 946 views

Profile: Dr. Menachem Moshelion

by Susan Steinhardt in BioData Blogs

Known for his work in plant aquaporins, Dr. Menachem Moshelion has published many papers concerning his research. He has been running a lab for the past five years at Hebrew University’s Institute of Plant Sciences and Genetics in Agriculture located in Rehovot.... Read more »

KALDENHOFF, R., BERTL, A., OTTO, B., MOSHELION, M., & UEHLEIN, N. (2007) Characterization of Plant Aquaporins. Methods in Enzymology, 505-531. DOI: 10.1016/S0076-6879(07)28028-0  

  • June 9, 2009
  • 05:51 AM
  • 678 views

Profile: Dr. Menachem Moshelion

by Susan Steinhardt in BioData Blogs

Known for his work in plant aquaporins, Dr. Menachem Moshelion has published many papers concerning his research. He has been running a lab for the past five years at Hebrew University’s Institute of Plant Sciences and Genetics in Agriculture located in Rehovot. Moshelion’s interest in science began at the age of five, “I’ve always been interested in science. I knew it, somehow… I didn’t have excellent marks [in school], but in Biology – I always got an........ Read more »

KALDENHOFF, R., BERTL, A., OTTO, B., MOSHELION, M., & UEHLEIN, N. (2007) Characterization of Plant Aquaporins. Methods in Enzymology, 505-531. DOI: 10.1016/S0076-6879(07)28028-0  

  • June 9, 2009
  • 05:51 AM
  • 658 views

Profile: Dr. Menachem Moshelion

by Susan Steinhardt in The PostDoc Forum

Known for his work in plant aquaporins, Dr. Menachem Moshelion has published many papers concerning his research. He has been running a lab for the past five years at Hebrew University’s Institute of Plant Sciences and Genetics in Agriculture located in Rehovot. Moshelion’s interest in science began at the age of five, “I’ve always been interested in science. I knew it, somehow… I didn’t have excellent marks [in school], but in Biology – I always got an........ Read more »

KALDENHOFF, R., BERTL, A., OTTO, B., MOSHELION, M., & UEHLEIN, N. (2007) Characterization of Plant Aquaporins. Methods in Enzymology, 505-531. DOI: 10.1016/S0076-6879(07)28028-0  

  • June 9, 2009
  • 05:30 AM
  • 996 views

What the American Beverage Association and Philip Morris have in common.

by Yoni Freedhoff in Weighty Matters

There was a letter to the editor in yesterday's New York Times. The letter was written by Ms. Susan K. Neely, the President of the American Beverage Association. According to their website the ABA`s members, "market hundreds of brands, flavors and packages, including regular and diet soft drinks, bottled water and water beverages, 100-percent juice and juice drinks, sports drinks, energy drinks and ready-to-drink teas."Susan was writing in response to an editorial where the New York Times call........ Read more »

Kelly D. Brownell, & Kenneth E. Warner. (2009) Big Tobacco Played Dirty and Millions Died. How Similar Is Big Food?. The Milbank Quarterly, 87(1), 259-294. DOI: 19298423  

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