Post List

  • January 11, 2016
  • 07:39 AM
  • 88 views

Treatment of Sleep Disorders Reduced Congestive Heart Failure Readmissions

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Sunil Sharma MD, FAASM Associate Professor of Medicine Director, Pulmonary Sleep Medicine Associate Director, Jefferson Sleep Disorders Center Thomas Jefferson University and Hospitals Philadelphia, PA 19107 Medical Research: What is the background for this study? Dr. Sharma: … Continue reading →
The post Treatment of Sleep Disorders Reduced Congestive Heart Failure Readmissions appeared first on MedicalResearch.com.
... Read more »

Dr. Sunil Sharma. (2016) Treatment of Sleep Disorders Reduced Congestive Heart Failure Readmissions. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • January 11, 2016
  • 07:06 AM
  • 172 views

Natural clays can help in the fight against bacteria

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

Main Point:

Natural clay (such as Oregon Blue clay) can help in killing a broad range of bacterial pathogens including antibiotic resistant bacteria.

Published in:

Scientific Reports

Study Further:

Researchers have reported that natural antibacterial clays upon hydration and topical application can kill human pathogens and these pathogens also include antibiotic resistant strains. They noted that only certain clays are bactericidal in nature. Those clays having soluble reduced met........ Read more »

  • January 11, 2016
  • 06:35 AM
  • 120 views

Depression reduces the chances of reaching good cardiovascular health

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

Main Point:

High level of depression is an important barrier to achieve best cardiovascular health.

Published in:

Scientific Reports

Study Further:

Cardiovascular problems are among the important causes of mortality throughout the world, that’s why researchers are working on the cardiovascular disorders and causes behind them. Some of the important causes or factors behind cardiovascular disorders are blood pressure, smoking (especially in men), and lipids. Some other risk f........ Read more »

Gaye, B., Prugger, C., Perier, M., Thomas, F., Plichart, M., Guibout, C., Lemogne, C., Pannier, B., Boutouyrie, P., Jouven, X.... (2016) High level of depressive symptoms as a barrier to reach an ideal cardiovascular health. The Paris Prospective Study III. Scientific Reports, 18951. DOI: 10.1038/srep18951  

  • January 11, 2016
  • 04:30 AM
  • 164 views

Help Yourself Improve Dorsiflexion A Little More

by Nicole Cattano in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

A dynamic self-stretching technique may improve dorsiflexion even better than traditional self-stretching due to a strap that aids in gliding the talus posteriorly relative to the distal tibia to improve arthrokinematics.... Read more »

  • January 11, 2016
  • 02:48 AM
  • 181 views

Fish oils for schizophrenia?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Hot on the heels of the peer-reviewed research-based suggestion that fish oil supplementation (high in omega-3 PUFAs) might have some rather important effects pertinent to the transition to full-threshold psychotic disorder for 'young people with an at-risk mental state' (see here), are the results from Tomasz Pawełczyk and colleagues [1].This time around it was a randomised, placebo-controlled trial "of either 2.2 g/day of n-3 PUFA, or olive oil placebo, with regard to symptom severity in firs........ Read more »

  • January 10, 2016
  • 03:21 PM
  • 149 views

Gene drive - take the wheel against malaria

by Syed Ather in Heuristic

Scientists are coming closer and closer to the dreams of genetic engineering just about
anything for any purpose. Now we can drive those dreams home by engineering mosquitos in
order to eliminate malaria, one of the biggest health and economic threats faced by
developing nations.... Read more »

Gantz, V., Jasinskiene, N., Tatarenkova, O., Fazekas, A., Macias, V., Bier, E., & James, A. (2015) Highly efficient Cas9-mediated gene drive for population modification of the malaria vector mosquito . Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 112(49). DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1521077112  

  • January 10, 2016
  • 02:37 PM
  • 175 views

Put the cellphone away! Fragmented baby care can affect brain development

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Mothers, put down your smartphones when caring for your babies! That's the message from University of California, Irvine researchers, who have found that fragmented and chaotic maternal care can disrupt proper brain development, which can lead to emotional disorders later in life.... Read more »

  • January 10, 2016
  • 02:09 PM
  • 163 views

Sources of Error: Epiphenomenalism (part 1)

by Sergio Graziosi in Writing my own user manual - Sergio Graziosi's Blog

Epiphenomenalism is one idea I’ve struggled with for a long time: to my eyes, it doesn’t make any sense. But more importantly, when applied to philosophy of mind, it seems to me that epiphenomenalism does a great deal of damage.…Read more ›... Read more »

Swinburne, Richard. (2011) Could anyone justifiably believe epiphenomenalism?. Journal of Consciousness Studies, 18(3-4), 196-216. info:/

  • January 10, 2016
  • 07:48 AM
  • 56 views

10% of Patients Receiving Implantable Defibrillators Are Frail Or Have Dementia

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Ariel R. Green, M.D., M.P.H Assistant Professor of Medicine Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: Implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) are widely used to … Continue reading →
The post 10% of Patients Receiving Implantable Defibrillators Are Frail Or Have Dementia appeared first on MedicalResearch.com.
... Read more »

Dr. Ariel Green Frank. (2016) 10% of Patients Receiving Implantable Defibrillators Are Frail Or Have Dementia. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • January 10, 2016
  • 07:00 AM
  • 70 views

Endosperm: the pivot of the sexual conflict in flowering plants

by Piter Boll in Earthling Nature

by Piter Kehoma Boll The theory of sexual selection, based on the idea that there are conflict of interests between males and females, is quite recognized, but almost entirely focused on animals, especially dioecious animals, i.e., animals in which males … Continue reading →... Read more »

Maruyama, D., Hamamura, Y., Takeuchi, H., Susaki, D., Nishimaki, M., Kurihara, D., Kasahara, R., & Higashiyama, T. (2013) Independent Control by Each Female Gamete Prevents the Attraction of Multiple Pollen Tubes. Developmental Cell, 25(3), 317-323. DOI: 10.1016/j.devcel.2013.03.013  

Schärer, L., Janicke, T., & Ramm, S. (2015) Sexual Conflict in Hermaphrodites. Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Biology, 7(1). DOI: 10.1101/cshperspect.a017673  

  • January 9, 2016
  • 07:40 PM
  • 44 views

Almost 90% Gastric Bypass Patients Feel Better After Surgery

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Sigrid Bjerge Gribsholt MD, PhD Student Department of Endocrinology and Internal Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital 8000 Aarhus C Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: Based on our clinical … Continue reading →
The post Almost 90% Gastric Bypass Patients Feel Better After Surgery appeared first on MedicalResearch.com.
... Read more »

Dr. Sigrid Bjerge Gribsholt. (2016) Almost 90% Gastric Bypass Patients Feel Better After Surgery. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • January 9, 2016
  • 04:23 PM
  • 175 views

Multi-Methodological Research in Supply Chain Management

by Andreas Wieland in Supply Chain Management Research

Just like OM research, SCM research is dominated by three research methodologies: (1) analytical modelling research (optimization, computational, and simulation models etc.), (2) quantitative empirical research (surveys etc., and (3) case study research. There has been a recent trend towards multi-methodological research that combines different methodologies. A new article by Choi, Cheng and Zhao, titled […]... Read more »

Choi, T., Cheng, T., & Zhao, X. (2015) Multi-Methodological Research in Operations Management. Production and Operations Management. DOI: 10.1111/poms.12534  

  • January 9, 2016
  • 03:36 PM
  • 189 views

Turning to the “Infected Jelly” to Treat Ebola

by Pranab Chatterjee in Scepticemia

The NEJM has come out with a very interesting paper: Evaluation of Convalescent Plasma for Ebola Virus Disease in Guinea. The explosive outbreak of Ebola Virus Disease in West Africa last year had hijacked the headlines and media space in a big way. Multiple solutions were touted, including the vaccine trial STRIVE. Few articles, however, looked…... Read more »

van Griensven J, Edwards T, de Lamballerie X, Semple MG, Gallian P, Baize S, Horby PW, Raoul H, Magassouba N, Antierens A.... (2016) Evaluation of Convalescent Plasma for Ebola Virus Disease in Guinea. The New England journal of medicine, 374(1), 33-42. PMID: 26735992  

  • January 9, 2016
  • 02:36 PM
  • 238 views

Feeling sick? It’s evolution’s way of telling you to stay home

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

When you have a fever, your nose is stuffed and your headache is spreading to your toes, your body is telling you to stay home in bed. Feeling sick is an evolutionary adaptation according to a hypothesis put forward by Prof. Guy Shakhar of the Weizmann Institute’s Immunology Department and Dr. Keren Shakhar of the Psychology Department of the College of Management Academic Studies.... Read more »

  • January 9, 2016
  • 01:28 PM
  • 205 views

If Colistin Goes, Can Carbapenems be Far Behind?

by Pranab Chatterjee in Scepticemia

I wrote about the disaster-in-the-making discovery of transmissible resistance to colistin, a last resort antibiotic, when the Lancet Infectious Diseases published a paper based on data coming out from surveillance in China. At that point of time, the isolation of the transmissible gene providing resistance (mcr1 gene) gained a lot of attention. Maryn McKenna’s blog post went…... Read more »

  • January 9, 2016
  • 12:33 PM
  • 72 views

New paper published – Leaf functional plasticity decreases the water consumption without further consequences for carbon uptake in Quercus coccifera L. under Mediterranean conditions

by Lauri Laanisto in Ülo Niinemets´ Lab

Text by Lauri Laanisto Another paper from the Mediterranen. This time Ülo has participated in a study dealing with a paradox regarding Quercus coccifera´s ecophysiological functioning in different climate zones. The paper is rather techincal, so I´m not gonna try … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • January 9, 2016
  • 09:51 AM
  • 210 views

The Myth of the Brain's Pain Matrix?

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

How does the brain encode physical pain? Which brain areas (if any) respond only to painful stimuli?



A new paper reports that one supposedly "pain-selective" brain region, the posterior insula, doesn't actually specifically encode pain - it activates in response to diverse non-painful stimuli as well. The study appears in PLoS Biology and it comes from Giulia Liberati and colleagues of the Université catholique de Louvain, Belgium.

Liberati et al. found that the insula responds to non-... Read more »

Liberati G, Klöcker A, Safronova MM, Ferrão Santos S, Ribeiro Vaz JG, Raftopoulos C, & Mouraux A. (2016) Nociceptive Local Field Potentials Recorded from the Human Insula Are Not Specific for Nociception. PLoS Biology, 14(1). PMID: 26734726  

  • January 9, 2016
  • 05:21 AM
  • 210 views

Serum folate levels in schizophrenia meta-analysed

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

So: "In conclusion, the present meta-analysis found that folate deficiency is associated to SZ [schizophrenia], and subgroups which did not reach enough statistical power need further investigation in the future."That was the research bottom line discussed in the paper by Dan Wang and colleagues [1] on a topic that has been of some interest to this blog down the years (see here and see here for example). Folate (folic acid if you will) is a pretty vital nutrient that, among other thing........ Read more »

  • January 8, 2016
  • 09:59 PM
  • 64 views

CRISPR Successfully Restores Gene Function in Animal Model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Rhonda Bassel-Duby, Ph.D. and Dr. Chengzu Long, PhD Department of Molecular Biology UT Southwestern Medical Center Dallas, TX 75390-9148 Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), … Continue reading →
The post CRISPR Successfully Restores Gene Function in Animal Model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy appeared first on MedicalResearch.com.
... Read more »

Rhonda Bassel-Duby, Ph.D. and, & Dr. Chengzu Long, Graduate Student. (2016) CRISPR Successfully Restores Gene Function in Animal Model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • January 8, 2016
  • 03:04 PM
  • 192 views

Stem cells regulate their own proliferation and their microenvironment

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

A study by researchers at the Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares Carlos III (CNIC) has identified a new mechanism through which hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) control both their own proliferation and the characteristics of the niche that houses them. This control is exercised by the protein E-Selectin Ligand-1 (ESL-1).... Read more »

join us!

Do you write about peer-reviewed research in your blog? Use ResearchBlogging.org to make it easy for your readers — and others from around the world — to find your serious posts about academic research.

If you don't have a blog, you can still use our site to learn about fascinating developments in cutting-edge research from around the world.

Register Now

Research Blogging is powered by SMG Technology.

To learn more, visit seedmediagroup.com.