Post List

  • May 28, 2015
  • 09:33 AM
  • 103 views

Live in a religious country? Your work ethic might be different.

by Tom Rees in Epiphenom

One of the seminal pieces of research on religion and society was done in the early 20th century by a guy named Max Weber, who concluded that what he called the ‘Protestant Work Ethic’ helped explain why the countries of Northern Europe and America were so prosperous. It’s a provocative conclusion that later research has shown was [Read More...]... Read more »

  • May 28, 2015
  • 08:47 AM
  • 69 views

From Herb Garden To Medicine Cabinet: Developing A New Drug for Malaria

by Bill Sullivan in The 'Scope

A new study has identified how the herb Dichroa febrifuga treats malaria, which is helping in the design of better therapies.... Read more »

Herman JD, Pepper LR, Cortese JF, Estiu G, Galinsky K, Zuzarte-Luis V, Derbyshire ER, Ribacke U, Lukens AK, Santos SA.... (2015) The cytoplasmic prolyl-tRNA synthetase of the malaria parasite is a dual-stage target of febrifugine and its analogs. Science translational medicine, 7(288). PMID: 25995223  

  • May 28, 2015
  • 06:18 AM
  • 2 views

Hospice Care May Decrease Depression in Surviving Spouses

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.co Interview with: Katherine Ornstein, PhD MPH Assistant Professor Brookdale Department of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine Institute for Translational Epidemiology Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai New York, NY 10029 Medical Research: What is the background for this study? … Continue reading →
The post Hospice Care May Decrease Depression in Surviving Spouses appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medica........ Read more »

MedicalResearch.co Interview with: Katherine Ornstein, PhD MPH. (2015) Hospice Care May Decrease Depression in Caregivers. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • May 28, 2015
  • 05:59 AM
  • 2 views

Mayo Researchers Develop Mouse Model To Study ALS and Frontotemporal Dementia

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Leonard Petrucelli Ph.D Mayo Clinic Jacksonville, FL 32224 MedicalResearch: What is the background for this study? Dr. Petrucelli: According to the ALS Association, more than 30,000 Americans live with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a condition that … Continue reading →
The post Mayo Researchers Develop Mouse Model To Study ALS and Frontotemporal Dementia appeared first on MedicalRe........ Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Dr. Leonard Petrucelli Ph.D. (2015) Mayo Researchers Develop Mouse Model To Study ALS and Frontotemporal Dementia. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • May 28, 2015
  • 05:10 AM
  • 93 views

Our jumpiness at nighttime is not just because it's dark

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

When something goes bump in the night, most of us are little jumpier than we would be in the day. But is that just because it's dark, or is it more to do with our bodies and brains switching to a vigilant nocturnal mode?Yadan Li and her colleagues have attempted to disentangle the influences of darkness and nighttime. They recruited 120 young women to complete a computer task in a windowless cubicle, which involved them looking at neutral pictures (e.g. nature scenes), scary pictures (e.g. spide........ Read more »

Li, Y., Ma, W., Kang, Q., Qiao, L., Tang, D., Qiu, J., Zhang, Q., & Li, H. (2015) Night or darkness, which intensifies the feeling of fear?. International Journal of Psychophysiology. DOI: 10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2015.04.021  

  • May 28, 2015
  • 04:44 AM
  • 88 views

How The Bird Got Its Beak

by Abzhanov in the Node

Nature’s most interesting secrets can sometimes be found in our own backyards. One such secret is related to all birds, those pigeons, thrushes and sparrows that we see everyday. This familiarity means that we do not think too much of birds passing them by on our way to work or school. However, if the birds […]... Read more »

Bhullar, B., Marugán-Lobón, J., Racimo, F., Bever, G., Rowe, T., Norell, M., & Abzhanov, A. (2012) Birds have paedomorphic dinosaur skulls. Nature, 487(7406), 223-226. DOI: 10.1038/nature11146  

Alberch,P., Gould,S.J., Oster,G.F., & Wake,D.B. (1979) Size and shape in ontogeny and phylogeny. Paleobiology , 296-317. info:/

Hodges, S., & Arnold, M. (1995) Spurring Plant Diversification: Are Floral Nectar Spurs a Key Innovation?. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 262(1365), 343-348. DOI: 10.1098/rspb.1995.0215  

  • May 28, 2015
  • 03:28 AM
  • 89 views

The autisms, case reports and two 'intervention' options

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

I'm looking at two papers today which I'd like to think cover the title of this post pretty well dealing with the plurality of autism - the autisms - and the idea that intervention or management-wise, there is no 'one size fits all' when it comes to the autisms.First up are the findings reported by Ziats and colleagues [1] who presented results for a child - "A 4-year-old male with autism and two episodes of neurodevelopmental regression" - who was also found to have a "mutation in the TMLHE gen........ Read more »

  • May 27, 2015
  • 08:47 PM
  • 75 views

Evolution of Darwin’s finches and their beaks revealed by genome sequencing

by Andrea Vucicevic in genome ecology evolution etc

Introduction Darwin’s finches from Galapagos and Cocos Island are classic example of young adaptive radiation, entirely intact because none of the species having become extinct as a result of human activity. They have diversified in beak sizes and shapes, feeding … Continue reading →... Read more »

Lamichhaney, S., Berglund, J., Almén, M., Maqbool, K., Grabherr, M., Martinez-Barrio, A., Promerová, M., Rubin, C., Wang, C., Zamani, N.... (2015) Evolution of Darwin’s finches and their beaks revealed by genome sequencing. Nature, 518(7539), 371-375. DOI: 10.1038/nature14181  

  • May 27, 2015
  • 03:52 PM
  • 87 views

Expanding the code of life with new ‘letters’

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

The DNA encoding all life on Earth is made of four building blocks called nucleotides, commonly known as “letters,” that line up in pairs and twist into a double helix. Now, two groups of scientists are reporting for the first time that two new nucleotides can do the same thing — raising the possibility that entirely new proteins could be created for medical uses.... Read more »

Georgiadis, M., Singh, I., Kellett, W., Hoshika, S., Benner, S., & Richards, N. (2015) Structural Basis for a Six Nucleotide Genetic Alphabet. Journal of the American Chemical Society, 2147483647. DOI: 10.1021/jacs.5b03482  

Zhang, L., Yang, Z., Sefah, K., Bradley, K., Hoshika, S., Kim, M., Kim, H., Zhu, G., Jiménez, E., Cansiz, S.... (2015) Evolution of Functional Six-Nucleotide DNA. Journal of the American Chemical Society. DOI: 10.1021/jacs.5b02251  

  • May 27, 2015
  • 03:13 PM
  • 74 views

On dialects, similects, and the -lishes

by Ray Carey in ELFA project

One of the major lines of English as a lingua franca (ELF) research is how to describe the features of English in interaction between second-language users. With the multitude of accents and variable usage of English you find in the world today, the most obvious quality of ELF talk is its diversity (some say it’s […]... Read more »

Mauranen, Anna. (2012) Exploring ELF: Academic English shaped by non-native speakers. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. info:/

  • May 27, 2015
  • 01:25 PM
  • 78 views

Human Evolution and the Stone Tool "Problem"

by Andrew White in AndyWhiteAnthropology

The recent announcement of the discovery in stone tools in Kenya dating to 3.3 million years ago (MYA) has been greeted with a lot of fanfare.  I first heard the story at some point earlier in the academic year, and I know there was a lot of buzz about it at the SAAs and Paleoanthropology meetings in San Francisco in April.  The publication of a formal paper in Nature last week (“3.3-Million-Year-Old Stone [...] ... Read more »

Harmand S, Lewis JE, Feibel CS, Lepre CJ, Prat S, Lenoble A, Boës X, Quinn RL, Brenet M, Arroyo A.... (2015) 3.3-million-year-old stone tools from Lomekwi 3, West Turkana, Kenya. Nature, 521(7552), 310-5. PMID: 25993961  

  • May 27, 2015
  • 10:37 AM
  • 86 views

Evidence of Violence from a Late Black Death Cemetery

by Katy Meyers Emery in Bones Don't Lie

When we study history, we tend to focus on the big events. This is especially true for medieval England where history is defined by wars, plagues, famines, and major changes […]... Read more »

  • May 27, 2015
  • 09:40 AM
  • 70 views

Video Tip of the Week: PANDA (Pathway AND Annotation) Explorer for lists of genes

by Mary in OpenHelix

This week’s Video Tip of the Week demonstrates PANDA, a tool for generating and examining annotations that are available for a list of genes, and evaluating them in the context of pathways. Two great tastes that taste great together, you know? So have a look at how PANDA can help you and your team to […]... Read more »

  • May 27, 2015
  • 08:50 AM
  • 66 views

Back in black: record efficiency for black-silicon solar cell

by Jonathan Trinastic in Goodnight Earth

Crystalline silicon solar cells are reaching their efficiency limit and manufacturing costs. But a new method to create black-silicon solar cells, potentially cheaper, has led to a record 22.1% efficiency. Learn about the physics behind the record here!... Read more »

Savin H, Repo P, von Gastrow G, Ortega P, Calle E, Garín M, & Alcubilla R. (2015) Black silicon solar cells with interdigitated back-contacts achieve 22.1% efficiency. Nature nanotechnology. PMID: 25984832  

  • May 27, 2015
  • 08:30 AM
  • 70 views

Where Do People Get Information About Dog Training?

by CAPB in Companion Animal Psychology Blog

Can people be blamed for dog training mistakes when there is so much erroneous information out there?Recently I saw a man walking a German Shepherd. Even from a distance it was clear the dog was nervous: his posture was low to the ground and the way he was walking made me wonder what kind of equipment he was on. As I waited at the traffic lights, I got a chance to see: a prong collar, tight, positioned high on his neck.There are easy alternatives, the simplest being a no-pull harness. I began to........ Read more »

Branson, N., Cobb, M., & McGreevy, P. (2009) Australian Working Dog Survey Report. Australian Animal Welfare Strategy. info:/

Deldalle, S., & Gaunet, F. (2014) Effects of two training methods on stress-related behaviors of the dog. Journal of Veterinary Behavior, 9(2), 58-65. info:/http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jveb.2013.11.004

  • May 27, 2015
  • 08:00 AM
  • 62 views

Hermit Houses And Fiddler Claws

by Mark Lasbury in As Many Exceptions As Rules

Fiddler crabs are an evolutionary marvel. Their major claw is huge, it plays a role in mate selection, but not just in the way you’d think.
Some species are right-clawed and some can have the major claw on either side, but if they lose one and grow it back, the major claw might switch sides! The new major claw isn’t as good for fighting, so he fakes being strong and tries to win without fighting.
... Read more »

Backwell, P., Matsumasa, M., Double, M., Roberts, A., Murai, M., Keogh, J., & Jennions, M. (2007) What are the consequences of being left-clawed in a predominantly right-clawed fiddler crab?. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 274(1626), 2723-2729. DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2007.0666  

  • May 27, 2015
  • 07:58 AM
  • 74 views

What To Do About A Slow Peer Reviewer?

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

An amusing editorial in the neuroscience journal Cortex discusses the excuses scientists use to explain why they didn't submit their peer reviews on time:
Following our nagging for late reviews, we learned that one reviewer had to take their cat to the vet, another was busy buying Christmas presents, one was planning their holidays, an unfortunate one had their office broken into [...] others agreed to review whereas indeed they really intended to withdraw, or were just too busy to reply.

Th... Read more »

  • May 27, 2015
  • 07:02 AM
  • 68 views

The NoMoPhobia Scale (NMP-Q): What  happens when you are without your smartphone

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

The smartphone has changed our lives. Just last fall, we wrote about the Fear of Missing Out (FOMO) Scale. As a reminder, that post was about how smartphones allow us to obsessively check our email and social media sites to see what our friends and followers and family members are doing— out of a fear […]

Related posts:
The Fear of Missing Out (FoMO) Scale
Stop looking at your smartphone & listen to me!
More than half of your potential jurors have  smartphones now


... Read more »

  • May 27, 2015
  • 06:58 AM
  • 4 views

Women May Be More Susceptible To Toxic Effects Of Alcohol On Heart

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Alexandra Gonçalves, MD, PhD Postdoctoral Research Fellow Cardiovascular Department Brigham and Women’s Hospital Boston, MA 02115 MedicalResearch.com: What is the background for this study? Dr. Gonçalves: Excessive alcohol consumption is associated with alcoholic cardiomyopathy, while light to … Continue reading →
The post Women May Be More Susceptible To Toxic Effects Of Alcohol On H........ Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Alexandra Gonçalves, MD, PhD. (2015) Women May Be More Susceptible To Toxic Effects Of Alcohol On Heart. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • May 27, 2015
  • 06:40 AM
  • 54 views

Some Birth Control Pills Have Slightly Higher Risk Of Venous Thromboembolism

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News
MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Yana Vinogradova, Research Fellow Division of Primary Care School of Medicine University of Nottingham Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: Combined oral contraceptives are an effective method of … Continue reading →
The post Some Birth Control Pills Have Slightly Higher Risk Of Venous Thromboembolism appeared first on MedicalResearch......... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Yana Vinogradova, Research Fellow. (2015) Some Birth Control Pills Have Slightly Higher Risk Of Venous Thromboembolism. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

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