Post List

  • October 15, 2014
  • 05:16 AM
  • 59 views

Hookworm infection and microchallenge for coeliac disease?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

I'm getting rather baffled by some of the literature appearing with the autoimmune condition coeliac (celiac) disease in mind. The paper by Kalliokoski and colleagues [1] started the bafflement ball rolling with their suggestion that: "administration of IgA-deficient celiac disease patient serum or total IgG induces both deterioration of the intestinal mucosa and clinical features of celiac disease in mice". Then came the paper from Namatovu and colleagues [2] who concluded that: ........ Read more »

Croese J, Giacomin P, Navarro S, Clouston A, McCann L, Dougall A, Ferreira I, Susianto A, O'Rourke P, Howlett M.... (2014) Experimental hookworm infection and gluten microchallenge promote tolerance in celiac disease. The Journal of allergy and clinical immunology. PMID: 25248819  

  • October 15, 2014
  • 04:38 AM
  • 75 views

How You Feel About People is Related to How You Feel About Cities

by Mark Rubin in Mark Rubin's Social Psychology Research Blog

There are numerous structural factors that influence people’s attitudes towards cities. However, these factors may be constituents of broader sociocultural “questions” that people ask about their cities.  For example, residents’ concern about the transport and entertainment venues of a city might form part of a broader social psychological concern about the potential for the city to accommodate their need to meet friends and socialize with others. Alternatively, people might focus on a ........ Read more »

  • October 15, 2014
  • 04:36 AM
  • 81 views

Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Mid-Cingulate Cortex

by The Neurocritic in The Neurocritic

What happens in the brain during a highly immersive reading experience? According to the fiction feeling hypothesis (Jacobs, 2014), narratives with highly emotional content cause a deeper sense of immersion by engaging the affective empathy network to a greater extent than neutral narratives. Emotional empathy – in this case, the ability to identify with a fictional character via grounded metarepresentations of ‘global emotional moments’ (Hsu et al., 2014) – relies on  a number of b........ Read more »

  • October 15, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 66 views

ACL Reconstruction Provides Not So Good Long-Term Outcomes

by Nicole Cattano in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

There is very little evidence that an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction can reduce the risk of knee osteoarthritis (OA). ... Read more »

  • October 14, 2014
  • 10:09 PM
  • 19 views

Weight Bias and Physical Activity

by Abena Edugyan in Your Active Edge

Does seeing an overweight person being active reduce weight bias? ... Read more »

  • October 14, 2014
  • 09:30 PM
  • 83 views

What is the habenula?

by neurosci in Neuroscientifically Challenged

Despite the fact that it is present in almost all vertebrate species, very little was known about the habenula until fairly recently. In the past several years, however, the habenula has received a significant amount of attention for its potential role in both cognition (e.g. reward processing) and disorders like depression. Still, the habenula remains a little-known structure whose functions are yet to be fully elucidated.Where is the habenula?The habenula is part of the diencephalon and, toget........ Read more »

  • October 14, 2014
  • 08:19 PM
  • 53 views

Ghost in the Lab

by Rodney Steadman in Gravity's Pull

How science can be used to explain paranormal experiences.... Read more »

Tandy V, & Lawrence TR. (1998) The Ghost in the Machine. Journal of the Society for Psychical Research, 62(851). info:/

Berglund B, Hassmén P, & Job R. (1996) Sources and effects of low-frequency noise. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 99(5), 2985-3002. DOI: 10.1121/1.414863  

  • October 14, 2014
  • 04:58 PM
  • 63 views

Carbon’s Place in a Silicon World

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Everything is silicon based, well mainly your computer, your TV, your ipad, and pretty much every piece of electronics in existence. Still the world turns and so does technology; at a similarly fast pace no less. Even as the 2014 Nobel Prize in Physics has enshrined light emitting diodes (LEDs) as the single most significant and disruptive energy-efficient lighting solution of today, scientists around the world continue unabated to search for the even-better-bulbs of tomorrow. In this search we ........ Read more »

Sharon Bahena-Garrido, Norihiro Shimoi, Daisuke Abe, Toshimasa Hojo, Yasumitsu Tanaka, & Kazuyuki Tohji. (2014) Plannar light source using a phosphor screen with single-walled carbon nanotubes as field emitters. Review of Scientific Instruments. info:/http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4895913

  • October 14, 2014
  • 02:15 PM
  • 56 views

Melanoma Cells: A Fatal Attraction to LPA

by Ines Alvarez-Garcia in PLOS Biologue

A hot day, blue sky and an even bluer sea. A perfect day to spend on the beach. But while our skin is sizzling, very few of us are aware of what some of our cells might be up to. … Continue reading »The post Melanoma Cells: A Fatal Attraction to LPA appeared first on PLOS Biologue.... Read more »

Muinonen-Martin, A., Susanto, O., Zhang, Q., Smethurst, E., Faller, W., Veltman, D., Kalna, G., Lindsay, C., Bennett, D., Sansom, O.... (2014) Melanoma Cells Break Down LPA to Establish Local Gradients That Drive Chemotactic Dispersal. PLoS Biology, 12(10). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.1001966  

  • October 14, 2014
  • 02:00 PM
  • 51 views

Drinking Decaf Coffee May Be Good for the Liver

by Wiley Asia Blog in Wiley Asia Blog - Health Sciences

Researchers from the National Cancer Institute report that decaffeinated coffee drinking may benefit liver health. Results of the study published in Hepatology, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, show that higher coffee consumption, regardless of caffeine content, was linked to lower levels of abnormal liver enzymes. This suggests that chemical compounds in coffee other than caffeine may help protect the liver.

Coffee consumption is highly prevalent with mo........ Read more »

  • October 14, 2014
  • 01:34 PM
  • 51 views

These Tiny Animals Live Only on Driftwood

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish

Maybe you gave your last realtor a long series of must-haves: a washing machine in unit, proximity to the train, a gas stovetop. But there’s no way you’re as picky as the driftwood hopper. This minute crustacean will only live in rotting chunks of driftwood. David Wildish, a marine zoologist at Fisheries and Oceans Canada, […]The post These Tiny Animals Live Only on Driftwood appeared first on Inkfish.... Read more »

  • October 14, 2014
  • 11:49 AM
  • 43 views

New Morbid Terminology: Overburden

by Katy Meyers Emery in Bones Don't Lie

As funerary archaeologists, we need to consider the whole range of behavior surrounding death and burial. This includes the ritual surrounding preparation of the body for burial, modes of transportation […]... Read more »

  • October 14, 2014
  • 11:30 AM
  • 48 views

Vampire Diaries: Tales of Sleep

by Allison in Dormivigilia

Researchers at UPENN have done gene profiles of blood taken from subjects sensitive or resistant to sleep deprivation. Is the blood gaining some street cred in neuroscience?... Read more »

Arnardottir, E., Nikonova, E., Shockley, K., Podtelezhnikov, A., Anafi, R., Tanis, K., Maislin, G., Stone, D., Renger, J., Winrow, C.... (2014) Blood-Gene Expression Reveals Reduced Circadian Rhythmicity in Individuals Resistant to Sleep Deprivation. SLEEP. DOI: 10.5665/sleep.4064  

  • October 14, 2014
  • 10:22 AM
  • 46 views

Treating school uniforms to reduce dengue: the Finances

by Yao-Hua Law in TORCH

 [A shorter version of this article first appeared on SciDev.Net] Scientists working to reduce dengue among school children in Thailand are testing something new: insecticide-treated school uniforms. A recent model published in PLoS One suggests that this intervention can be economically attractive in the context of Thailand. Using data from dengue studies in Thailand, the […]... Read more »

  • October 14, 2014
  • 09:34 AM
  • 80 views

What do we share with other primates in terms of cognition?

by Henkjan Honing in Music Matters

Below a beautiful summary of the recent literature on the neurobiology of action imitation/understanding, language, and rhythmic processing/auditory timing (Mendoza & Merchant, in press). The neural circuitry that is thought to be involved in all three higher cognitive functions is shown here for three closely related primates: the macaque monkey, chimpanzee and human brain.... Read more »

Merchant, H., & Honing, H. (2013) Are non-human primates capable of rhythmic entrainment? Evidence for the gradual audiomotor evolution hypothesis. Frontiers in Neuroscience, 7(274). info:/

  • October 14, 2014
  • 09:30 AM
  • 64 views

Zombies And The Loss of Free Will

by Mark E. Lasbury in The 'Scope

Nature is rife with examples of how one organism can rob another of its free will, turning them into zombies so to say. Who would have guessed that Alfred Hitchcock's The Birds was really a zombie movie.... Read more »

  • October 14, 2014
  • 07:10 AM
  • 71 views

Prenatal genetic testing and autism: a delicate subject

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

I realise that the paper by Lei-Shih Chen and colleagues [1] covers a most sensitive topic when it comes to the autism spectrum, exploring: "the attitudes toward PGT [prenatal genetic testing] and termination decisions of 42 parents of children with ASD [autism spectrum disorder]". Indeed, this is not the first time that this research group has looked at this area of autism research [2] and it seems like they will be talking about it further too (see here).I chose to discuss the most recent........ Read more »

  • October 14, 2014
  • 06:28 AM
  • 71 views

Is this the dark side of emotional intelligence? High EI linked with more delinquency among young women

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

If, as research suggests, the psychological trait of sensation seeking is the catalyst for youthful delinquency, might high emotional intelligence (EI; having empathy for other people's emotions and good control over one's own) act as a calming restraint? That was the question Alison Bacon her colleagues posed in their study of 96 undergrads (average age 20; 48 women).Their "surprising and unprecedented" discovery was that for women, not only did high EI not moderate the link between sensation s........ Read more »

  • October 13, 2014
  • 11:22 PM
  • 4 views

You don't need that big expensive magnet to do NMR!!!

by mrsitandspin in Sit and Spin

This post to discusses two papers that explore NMR without a big and expensive magnet!... Read more »

Ganssle, P., Shin, H., Seltzer, S., Bajaj, V., Ledbetter, M., Budker, D., Knappe, S., Kitching, J., & Pines, A. (2014) Ultra-Low-Field NMR Relaxation and Diffusion Measurements Using an Optical Magnetometer. Angewandte Chemie International Edition, 53(37), 9766-9770. DOI: 10.1002/anie.201403416  

Ha, D., Paulsen, J., Sun, N., Song, Y., & Ham, D. (2014) Scalable NMR spectroscopy with semiconductor chips. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 111(33), 11955-11960. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1402015111  

  • October 13, 2014
  • 10:37 PM
  • 57 views

The Attraction of Axons; the Moth or the Spider?

by Wadsworth in Wadsworth Guidance

An axon is attracted towards its target by guidance cues.  A moth flies towards the source of a pheromone.  A spider is sucked across the floor towards the nozzle of a vacuum cleaner.  Is the attraction of an axon towards its target more like the movement of the moth or the spider?credit: pmillera4External molecules direct the movement of the axon, the moth, and the spider.  In response to pheromone molecules a moth directs its movement toward the source of the pheromone.&nbs........ Read more »

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