Post List

  • October 14, 2014
  • 02:00 PM
  • 50 views

Drinking Decaf Coffee May Be Good for the Liver

by Wiley Asia Blog in Wiley Asia Blog - Health Sciences

Researchers from the National Cancer Institute report that decaffeinated coffee drinking may benefit liver health. Results of the study published in Hepatology, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases, show that higher coffee consumption, regardless of caffeine content, was linked to lower levels of abnormal liver enzymes. This suggests that chemical compounds in coffee other than caffeine may help protect the liver.

Coffee consumption is highly prevalent with mo........ Read more »

  • October 14, 2014
  • 01:34 PM
  • 48 views

These Tiny Animals Live Only on Driftwood

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish

Maybe you gave your last realtor a long series of must-haves: a washing machine in unit, proximity to the train, a gas stovetop. But there’s no way you’re as picky as the driftwood hopper. This minute crustacean will only live in rotting chunks of driftwood. David Wildish, a marine zoologist at Fisheries and Oceans Canada, […]The post These Tiny Animals Live Only on Driftwood appeared first on Inkfish.... Read more »

  • October 14, 2014
  • 11:49 AM
  • 38 views

New Morbid Terminology: Overburden

by Katy Meyers Emery in Bones Don't Lie

As funerary archaeologists, we need to consider the whole range of behavior surrounding death and burial. This includes the ritual surrounding preparation of the body for burial, modes of transportation […]... Read more »

  • October 14, 2014
  • 11:30 AM
  • 47 views

Vampire Diaries: Tales of Sleep

by Allison in Dormivigilia

Researchers at UPENN have done gene profiles of blood taken from subjects sensitive or resistant to sleep deprivation. Is the blood gaining some street cred in neuroscience?... Read more »

Arnardottir, E., Nikonova, E., Shockley, K., Podtelezhnikov, A., Anafi, R., Tanis, K., Maislin, G., Stone, D., Renger, J., Winrow, C.... (2014) Blood-Gene Expression Reveals Reduced Circadian Rhythmicity in Individuals Resistant to Sleep Deprivation. SLEEP. DOI: 10.5665/sleep.4064  

  • October 14, 2014
  • 10:22 AM
  • 45 views

Treating school uniforms to reduce dengue: the Finances

by Yao-Hua Law in TORCH

 [A shorter version of this article first appeared on SciDev.Net] Scientists working to reduce dengue among school children in Thailand are testing something new: insecticide-treated school uniforms. A recent model published in PLoS One suggests that this intervention can be economically attractive in the context of Thailand. Using data from dengue studies in Thailand, the […]... Read more »

  • October 14, 2014
  • 09:34 AM
  • 76 views

What do we share with other primates in terms of cognition?

by Henkjan Honing in Music Matters

Below a beautiful summary of the recent literature on the neurobiology of action imitation/understanding, language, and rhythmic processing/auditory timing (Mendoza & Merchant, in press). The neural circuitry that is thought to be involved in all three higher cognitive functions is shown here for three closely related primates: the macaque monkey, chimpanzee and human brain.... Read more »

Merchant, H., & Honing, H. (2013) Are non-human primates capable of rhythmic entrainment? Evidence for the gradual audiomotor evolution hypothesis. Frontiers in Neuroscience, 7(274). info:/

  • October 14, 2014
  • 09:30 AM
  • 62 views

Zombies And The Loss of Free Will

by Mark E. Lasbury in The 'Scope

Nature is rife with examples of how one organism can rob another of its free will, turning them into zombies so to say. Who would have guessed that Alfred Hitchcock's The Birds was really a zombie movie.... Read more »

  • October 14, 2014
  • 07:10 AM
  • 70 views

Prenatal genetic testing and autism: a delicate subject

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

I realise that the paper by Lei-Shih Chen and colleagues [1] covers a most sensitive topic when it comes to the autism spectrum, exploring: "the attitudes toward PGT [prenatal genetic testing] and termination decisions of 42 parents of children with ASD [autism spectrum disorder]". Indeed, this is not the first time that this research group has looked at this area of autism research [2] and it seems like they will be talking about it further too (see here).I chose to discuss the most recent........ Read more »

  • October 14, 2014
  • 06:28 AM
  • 70 views

Is this the dark side of emotional intelligence? High EI linked with more delinquency among young women

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

If, as research suggests, the psychological trait of sensation seeking is the catalyst for youthful delinquency, might high emotional intelligence (EI; having empathy for other people's emotions and good control over one's own) act as a calming restraint? That was the question Alison Bacon her colleagues posed in their study of 96 undergrads (average age 20; 48 women).Their "surprising and unprecedented" discovery was that for women, not only did high EI not moderate the link between sensation s........ Read more »

  • October 13, 2014
  • 10:37 PM
  • 53 views

The Attraction of Axons; the Moth or the Spider?

by Wadsworth in Wadsworth Guidance

An axon is attracted towards its target by guidance cues.  A moth flies towards the source of a pheromone.  A spider is sucked across the floor towards the nozzle of a vacuum cleaner.  Is the attraction of an axon towards its target more like the movement of the moth or the spider?credit: pmillera4External molecules direct the movement of the axon, the moth, and the spider.  In response to pheromone molecules a moth directs its movement toward the source of the pheromone.&nbs........ Read more »

  • October 13, 2014
  • 07:01 PM
  • 42 views

What do clinicians make of addiction recovery?

by DJMac in Recovery Review

Which teachers were the best when you were at school? Likely the ones who believed in you, connected with you, who had a vision for where you could go and who enthusiastically helped you get there. The same characteristics are likely to define the best clinicians too. In a study, published a few days ago, [...]
The post What do clinicians make of addiction recovery? appeared first on Recovery Review.
... Read more »

  • October 13, 2014
  • 05:30 PM
  • 73 views

Yes folks... broccoli chemical impacts on autism presentation

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Please do not adjust your set. Broccoli, or least a chemical found in broccoli called sulforaphane has, under placebo-controlled, double-blind experimental conditions, been reported to impact on the presentation of autism according to the paper by Kanwaljit Singh and colleagues [1] (open-access).Eat your greens @ Fir0002/FlagstaffotosI had to do a bit of a double-take myself when I first read about these results (see here). Indeed, even the authors themselves seemed to be a l........ Read more »

Kanwaljit Singh, Susan L. Connors, Eric A. Macklin, Kirby D. Smith, Jed W. Fahey, Paul Talalay, & Andrew W. Zimmerman. (2014) Sulforaphane treatment of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). PNAS. info:/10.1073/pnas.1416940111

  • October 13, 2014
  • 05:27 PM
  • 71 views

Free Radicals and Wound Healing

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Free radicals, said in the right crowd and you might hear someone scream for their life. Of course, to be perfectly transparent antioxidants have already shown to be bad in plenty of cases, so maybe it’s just bad PR. Still they were long assumed to be destructive to tissues and cells causing a host of age related problems with them. Well new research is showing that “free radicals” generated by the cell’s mitochondria—the energy producing “powerhouse” structures in the cell—are a........ Read more »

Suhong Xu,, & Andrew D. Chisholm. (2014) C. elegans Epidermal Wounding Induces a Mitochondrial ROS Burst that Promotes Wound Repair . Developmental Cell. info:/http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.devcel.2014.08.002

  • October 13, 2014
  • 05:17 PM
  • 75 views

Emodiversity: A Mix of Emotions Is Healthiest?

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

“Emodiversity” – a life containing a balance of different emotions – is good for you. So say psychologists Jordi Quoidbach and colleagues in a rather cool new paper (pdf). In two large surveys (with a total of over 37,000 responders), conducted in France and Belgium, Quoidbach et al. show that emodiversity is an independent predictor […]The post Emodiversity: A Mix of Emotions Is Healthiest? appeared first on Neuroskeptic.... Read more »

Quoidbach J, Gruber J, Mikolajczak M, Kogan A, Kotsou I, & Norton MI. (2014) Emodiversity and the Emotional Ecosystem. Journal of experimental psychology. General. PMID: 25285428  

  • October 13, 2014
  • 10:18 AM
  • 65 views

Guiding light to boost algae biofuel production

by This Science is Crazy! in This Science Is Crazy!

New study uses waveguides dotted with SU-8 pillars to scatter light in a tank of algae. By varying the spacing of the pillars, light intensity across the tank was approximately uniform and increased algae growth by 'at least 40%' compared to scheme with uniformly-distributed pillars... Read more »

  • October 13, 2014
  • 07:59 AM
  • 102 views

The Psychology of Procrastination: How We Create Categories of the Future

by Jalees Rehman in The Next Regeneration

A fully rational approach to task completion would involve creating a priority list of tasks based on a composite score of task importance and the remaining time until the deadline. The most important task with the most proximate deadline would have to be tackled first, and the lowest priority task with the furthest deadline last. This sounds great in theory, but it is quite difficult to implement. A substantial amount of research has been conducted to understand how our moods, distractability a........ Read more »

  • October 13, 2014
  • 07:58 AM
  • 76 views

Evolutionary psychologists expose the "shoddy" treatment of their discipline by textbooks

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

The Gendered Society contained 12 errors about evolutionary psychology, morethan any other book in this evaluation. Evolutionary theory is universally accepted among the mainstream science community. And yet, when the evolutionary perspective is applied to human behaviour, the approach continues to meet with resistance, and in some cases outright disdain.A team led by Benjamin Winegard thinks part of the reason is because of the misrepresentation of evolutionary psychology in textbooks, esp........ Read more »

Winegard BM, Winegard BM, & Deaner RO. (2014) Misrepresentations of evolutionary psychology in sex and gender textbooks. Evolutionary psychology : an international journal of evolutionary approaches to psychology and behavior, 12(3), 474-508. PMID: 25299988  

  • October 13, 2014
  • 04:46 AM
  • 70 views

Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy (CBT) for anxiety in autism

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

I'll readily admit that despite having a tinge of psychology running through my research career, I'm not overly enthused about the impact of the discipline on the autism spectrum down the years. I'm not necessarily just talking about the Freudian effect which set autism research back decades and shamefully added needless worry and stigma to those on the spectrum and their loved ones, but also the grand over-arching psychological theories which seemed, for example, to completely miss the 'heterog........ Read more »

  • October 13, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 71 views

Fatigue Does Not Have A Leg To Stand On

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Soccer players have impaired postural control after a fatigue-inducing task. The single-leg balance impairment was related to repeated sprint ability performance, which suggests that an athlete who was less fatigued by a sprinting task had less balance impairment.... Read more »

Pau, M., Ibba, G., & Attene, G. (2014) Fatigue-Induced Balance Impairment in Young Soccer Players. Journal of Athletic Training, 49(4), 454-461. DOI: 10.4085/1062-6050-49.2.12  

  • October 12, 2014
  • 05:37 PM
  • 74 views

Language users or learners? Lexical evidence from spoken ELF

by Ray Carey in ELFA project

One of the key distinctions made in research on English as a lingua franca (ELF) is the difference between language users and learners. ELF data is typically approached from the viewpoint of second language use instead of second language acquisition. Rather than seeing non-native English speakers as perennially deficient pursuers of “native-like” proficiency, ELF researchers […]... Read more »

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