Post List

  • December 21, 2016
  • 04:30 AM
  • 221 views

Colder May Not Be Cool for Recovery

by Nicole Cattano in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

After exercise, cold water immersion at 15°C may offer some improvements in recovery based on performance of a jump task and possibly markers of muscle damage. A colder temperature may not be as effective as cool water, so controlling the treatment parameters based on evidence is important.... Read more »

Vieira, A., Siqueira, A., Ferreira-Junior, J., do Carmo, J., Durigan, J., Blazevich, A., & Bottaro, M. (2016) The Effect of Water Temperature during Cold-Water Immersion on Recovery from Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage. International Journal of Sports Medicine, 37(12), 937-943. DOI: 10.1055/s-0042-111438  

  • December 20, 2016
  • 11:15 AM
  • 296 views

10 scientifically proven ways to influence or know the people silently

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

Want to know if someone is interested? Watch their pupils

The pupils are among those parts of body languages that are not in our conscious control. White and Maltzman (1977) found that the pupil starts dilating when a person shows interest in some other person he or she talking to.

Via: Psyblog

Feet

Want to know the person is into you? Watch the feet

Most people know how to keep a check on their expressions, but they are unaware about their feet. So, if a person is interested in........ Read more »

  • December 20, 2016
  • 08:19 AM
  • 233 views

Poking holes into membranes to label proteins for live imaging

by Gal Haimovich in Green Fluorescent Blog

There are two major way to label inner proteins, structures or organnelles for live cell imaging. The most common method is fusing the studied protein to a fluorescent protein. A second approach is the addition of labeling agents from outside the … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • December 20, 2016
  • 07:02 AM
  • 223 views

Diagnosing the Source Region of a Solar Burst on 26 September 2011 by Using Microwave Type-III Pairs by Tan B. L. et al.*

by CESRA in Solar Radio Science

Accelerated electron beams are believed to be responsible for both hard X-ray (HXR) and strong coherent radio emission during solar flares. However, so far the location of the electron acceleration and its physical parameters are poorly known. The solar microwave Type-III pair burst is possibly the most sensitive signature of [...]... Read more »

  • December 20, 2016
  • 04:33 AM
  • 277 views

Generation R does gestational vitamin D levels and autistic traits

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"Gestational vitamin D deficiency was associated with autism-related traits in a large population-based sample. Because gestational vitamin D deficiency is readily preventable with safe, cheap and accessible supplements, this candidate risk factor warrants closer scrutiny."So said the findings reported by Vinkhuyzen and colleagues [1] (open-access) reporting on data derived from "the Generation R Study, a population-based prospective cohort from fetal life onward, based in Rotterdam, The Netherl........ Read more »

Vinkhuyzen AA, Eyles DW, Burne TH, Blanken LM, Kruithof CJ, Verhulst F, Jaddoe VW, Tiemeier H, & McGrath JJ. (2016) Gestational vitamin D deficiency and autism-related traits: the Generation R Study. Molecular psychiatry. PMID: 27895322  

  • December 20, 2016
  • 04:30 AM
  • 214 views

Is High School Specialization Needed to Participate at the Division I Level?

by Adam Lake in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

The majority of athletes participating in NCAA Division I sports reported that they were not highly specialized in that sport during high school.... Read more »

Post, E., Thein-Nissenbaum, J., Stiffler, M., Brooks, M., Bell, D., Sanfilippo, J., Trigsted, S., Heiderscheit, B., & McGuine, T. (2016) High School Sport Specialization Patterns of Current Division I Athletes. Sports Health: A Multidisciplinary Approach. DOI: 10.1177/1941738116675455  

  • December 19, 2016
  • 08:43 AM
  • 260 views

I am morally superior to others and also less biased than  everyone….

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

While you may think you have heard this line recently, this is really (based on new research) what most of us think about ourselves. It is called the “better than average effect” and it is very persistent. We might smirk at politicians who actually say things like this aloud, but that’s only because we tend […]... Read more »

  • December 19, 2016
  • 04:52 AM
  • 240 views

Neuroscience Spots Potential Criminals In Pre-School?

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

A new post at Quartz discusses
The disturbingly accurate brain science that identifies potential criminals while they’re still toddlers... scientists are able to use brain tests on three-year-olds to determine which children are more likely to grow up to become criminals.


Hmmm. Not really.

The research in question is from from North Carolina researchers Avshalom Caspi et al.: Childhood forecasting of a small segment of the population with large economic burden. It's based on a long-term... Read more »

Caspi, A., Houts, R., Belsky, D., Harrington, H., Hogan, S., Ramrakha, S., Poulton, R., & Moffitt, T. (2016) Childhood forecasting of a small segment of the population with large economic burden. Nature Human Behaviour, 5. DOI: 10.1038/s41562-016-0005  

  • December 19, 2016
  • 03:19 AM
  • 264 views

Gut barrier integrity meets blood-brain barrier integrity with autism in mind

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"In the ASD [autism spectrum disorder] brain, there is an altered expression of genes associated with BBB [blood-brain barrier] integrity coupled with increased neuroinflammation and possibly impaired gut barrier integrity."Although pretty enthused to see research linking names like Anna Sapone, Tim Buie and Alessio Fasano in the recent paper published by Maria Fiorentino and colleagues [1] (open-access), I was slightly less impressed with the use of the term 'the ASD brain' ........ Read more »

Fiorentino, M., Sapone, A., Senger, S., Camhi, S., Kadzielski, S., Buie, T., Kelly, D., Cascella, N., & Fasano, A. (2016) Blood–brain barrier and intestinal epithelial barrier alterations in autism spectrum disorders. Molecular Autism, 7(1). DOI: 10.1186/s13229-016-0110-z  

  • December 18, 2016
  • 05:45 AM
  • 260 views

Fusion and sex in protocells & the start of evolution

by Artem Kaznatcheev in Evolutionary Games Group

In 1864, five years after reading Darwin’s On the Origin of Species, Pyotr Kropotkin — the anarchist prince of mutual aid — was leading a geographic survey expedition aboard a dog-sleigh — a distinctly Siberian variant of the HMS Beagle. In the harsh Manchurian climate, Kropotkin did not see competition ‘red in tooth and claw’, […]... Read more »

Sinai, S, Olejarz, J, Neagu, IA, & Nowak, MA. (2016) Primordial Sex Facilitates the Emergence of Evolution. arXiv. arXiv: 1612.00825v1

  • December 18, 2016
  • 12:41 AM
  • 202 views

On the Interpretation of Neuroscientific Findings

by Justin A. Sattin in The Ghost of Charcot

A review of classic "split brain" research and critique of a new paper regarding "functional" splits in brain function.... Read more »

Sasai, S., Boly, M., Mensen, A., & Tononi, G. (2016) Functional split brain in a driving/listening paradigm. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 113(50), 14444-14449. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1613200113  

  • December 17, 2016
  • 11:55 PM
  • 242 views

Some of the most beautiful emotions with no direct English words

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

So, here is a vocabulary of some of the loveliest and beautiful emotions having no direct English translations:

Að jenna (Icelandic): Willingness or ability to continue the hard or boring tasks
Ah-un ((阿吽, Japanese): Unspoken communication between close friends
Cafune (Portuguese): Tenderly moving fingers through the hairs of a lover one
Fargin (Yiddish): To show or express pride and happiness at the success of others
Early morning

Gökotta (Swedish): Waking up early to hea........ Read more »

  • December 17, 2016
  • 05:51 AM
  • 247 views

Pregnancy influenza infection not linked to offspring autism

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"There was no association between maternal influenza [flu] infection anytime during pregnancy and increased ASD [autism spectrum disorder] risk."So said the findings reported by Ousseny Zerbo and colleagues [1] continuing a research theme from this author (see here for example) looking at how various infections 'encountered' during critical periods of pregnancy may / may not impact on offspring autism risk. This time around the focus was on viral infections and in partic........ Read more »

  • December 16, 2016
  • 07:02 AM
  • 258 views

Power poses: It was such a nice idea but it  cannot be replicated (so far)

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Last week the Shark Tank television show was apparently shown during a time my DVR was trying to record another show for me. As I watched it, I was amused to see a couple of entrepreneurs whispering to each other to do “power poses” before they pitched to the shark-investors. I was amused, because I’d […]... Read more »

Bartlett, T. (2016) Power Poser: When big ideas go bad. Chronicle of Higher Education. info:/

  • December 16, 2016
  • 05:25 AM
  • 232 views

Patient participation in clinical trials

by Joana Guedes in BHD Research Blog

Clinical trials are crucial to help doctors and scientists understand how to safely treat a particular condition, to evaluate new treatments and to test drug safety and efficacy. They have an important role in every step of managing a condition with different clinical trials helping with prevention, diagnosis, treatments and follow-up support.... Read more »

  • December 16, 2016
  • 05:00 AM
  • 204 views

Friday Fellow: Common Stonewort

by Piter Boll in Earthling Nature

by Piter Kehoma Boll It’s always hard to introduce a less charismatic species here. Not because they are less interesting to me, but because I cannot find good information available. But I try to do my best to show all … Continue reading →... Read more »

Ariosa, Y., Quesada, A., Aburto, J., Carrasco, D., Carreres, R., Leganes, F., & Fernandez Valiente, E. (2004) Epiphytic Cyanobacteria on Chara vulgaris Are the Main Contributors to N2 Fixation in Rice Fields. Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 70(9), 5391-5397. DOI: 10.1128/AEM.70.9.5391-5397.2004  

  • December 16, 2016
  • 04:30 AM
  • 203 views

Frequency and Location of Head Impacts in Division 1 Men’s Lacrosse Players

by Patricia Kelshaw, MS, LAT, ATC in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Player position and session type such as practice or game are the main factors that influence head impact frequencies and magnitudes for lacrosse athletes.... Read more »

  • December 16, 2016
  • 03:16 AM
  • 239 views

Non-febrile seizures in children with autism vs unaffected siblings

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"Children with idiopathic ASD [autism spectrum disorder] are significantly more likely to have non-febrile seizures than their unaffected siblings, suggesting that non-febrile seizures may be ASD-specific."So said the findings from Lena McCue and colleagues [1] (open-access) continuing a research theme looking at one of the important 'comorbidities' that seems to be over-represented when it comes to a diagnosis of autism (see here). Idiopathic autism or ASD refers to autism as the........ Read more »

  • December 15, 2016
  • 04:30 AM
  • 221 views

Cortisol and Testosterone Levels Following Exhaustive Endurance Exercise: How Much Recovery Do Athletes Really Need?

by Jennifer Fields in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Following high-intensity endurance exercise, recovery may require 48-72 hours for cortisol and testosterone to return back to resting levels. ... Read more »

Anderson, T., Lane, A., & Hackney, A. (2016) Cortisol and testosterone dynamics following exhaustive endurance exercise. European Journal of Applied Physiology, 116(8), 1503-1509. DOI: 10.1007/s00421-016-3406-y  

  • December 15, 2016
  • 02:59 AM
  • 271 views

ADHD, not autism, might count when it comes to 'comorbid psychiatric symptomatology'

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

A quote to begin this fairly brief post: "Our study concluded that higher levels of ADHD [attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder] severity-not ASD [autism spectrum disorder] severity-were associated with a higher prevalence of comorbid psychiatric symptomatology in school-age children with ASD. These findings may encourage clinicians to thoroughly assess ADHD symptomatology in ASD children to better inform treatment planning."That was the research bottom line reported by Ro........ Read more »

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