Hadas Shema

60 posts · 79,659 views

Bar-Ilan University graduate student.

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  • June 28, 2014
  • 09:42 AM
  • 771 views

Introduction to open peer review

by Hadas Shema in Information Culture

Last post we talked about traditional peer review, which is at least single-blinded. This time we will focus on Open Peer Review (OPR). The narrowest way to describe OPR is as a process in which the...

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  • June 21, 2014
  • 01:09 PM
  • 998 views

Discussion, criticism and advice-giving: content analysis of health blogs.

by Hadas Shema in Information Culture

My PhD mostly dealt with research blogs from ResearchBlogging.org (RB) an aggregator of blog posts covering peer-reviewed research. In this article, we (Prof. Judit Bar-Ilan, Prof. Mike Thelwall and...

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Shema, H., Bar-Ilan, J., Thelwall, M. (2014) How is Research Blogged? A Content Analysis Approach . JASIST. info:/10.1002/asi.23239

  • April 19, 2014
  • 03:19 PM
  • 679 views

Introduction to Traditional Peer Review

by Hadas Shema in Information Culture

Peer review was introduced to scholarly publication in 1731 by the Royal Society of Edinburgh, which published a collection of peer-reviewed medical articles. Despite this early start, in many...

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Biagioli, M. (2002) From Book Censorship to Academic Peer Review. Emergences: Journal for the Study of Media , 12(1), 11-45. DOI: 10.1080/1045722022000003435  

Benos DJ, Bashari E, Chaves JM, Gaggar A, Kapoor N, LaFrance M, Mans R, Mayhew D, McGowan S, Polter A.... (2007) The ups and downs of peer review. Advances in physiology education, 31(2), 145-52. PMID: 17562902  

Bornman, L. (2008) Scientific Peer Review: An Analysis of the Peer Review Process from the Perspective of Sociology of Science Theories. Human Architecture: Journal of the Sociology of Self-Knowledge, 6(2). info:/

Brown, R. (2006) Double Anonymity and the Peer Review Process. The Scientific World JOURNAL, 1274-1277. DOI: 10.1100/tsw.2006.228  

Callaham ML, Baxt WG, Waeckerle JF, & Wears RL. (1998) Reliability of editors' subjective quality ratings of peer reviews of manuscripts. JAMA : the journal of the American Medical Association, 280(3), 229-31. PMID: 9676664  

Spier R. (2002) The history of the peer-review process. Trends in biotechnology, 20(8), 357-8. PMID: 12127284  

  • March 4, 2014
  • 08:19 PM
  • 589 views

Altmetrics: emphasizing the plural

by Hadas Shema in Information Culture

One of the challenges we face when using alternative metrics is the interpretation of what we measure.  This is even more confusing than interpreting traditional citation impact (which is challenging...

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Taylor, M., & Plume, A. (2014) Party papers or policy discussions: an examination of highly shared papers using altmetric data . Research Trends, 17-20. info:/

  • February 8, 2014
  • 01:06 PM
  • 1,542 views

The Impact of TED Talks

by Hadas Shema in Information Culture

With over a billion views, TED (Technology, Entertainment, and Design) talks are a huge business. There are two main TED conferences a year – the TED conference and the TEDGlobal, and a large number...

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  • November 27, 2013
  • 04:52 PM
  • 684 views

More about altmetrics

by Hadas Shema in Information Culture

When in trouble or in doubt, invent new words. We have bibliometrics and scientometrics from the Age of Print. Now they are joined by informetrics, cybermetrics, webometrics and altmetrics, which...

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Taylor, M. (2013) Towards a common model of citation: some thoughts on merging altmetrics and bibliometrics. Research Trends. info:/

  • August 27, 2013
  • 06:26 PM
  • 734 views

Put your money where your citations are: a proposal for a new funding system

by Hadas Shema in Information Culture

Funding agencies allocate funds for scientific research mainly based on peer-review of research proposals.  In 2010, more than 15,000 researchers peer-reviewed more than 55,000 proposals.  I think we...

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Johan Bollen, David Crandall, Damion Junk, Ying Ding, & Katy Boerner. (2013) Collective allocation of science funding: from funding agencies to scientific agency. ArXiv. arXiv: 1304.1067v1

  • August 3, 2013
  • 07:13 PM
  • 754 views

Thoughts about altmetrics (an unorganized, overdue post)

by Hadas Shema in Information Culture

I  haven’t written about altmetrics so far. Not because it’s not a worthwhile subject, but because there’s so much I don’t know where to begin. The term “altmetrics” was first suggested in a...

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Stefanie Haustein, Isabella Peters, Judit Bar-Ilan, Jason Priem, Hadas Shema, & Jens Terliesner. (2013) Coverage and adoption of altmetrics sources in the bibliometric community. ISSI conference. arXiv: 1304.7300v1

  • June 26, 2013
  • 09:42 AM
  • 1,202 views

Do blog posts correlate with a higher number of future citations?

by Hadas Shema in Information Culture

Do blog posts correlate with a higher number of future citations? In many cases, yes, at least for Researchblogging.org (RB). Judit Bar-Ilan, Mike Thelwall and I already used RB, a science blogging aggregator for posts citing peer-reviewed research, in our previous article. RB has many advantages (if you read the previous article’s post, you can [...]... Read more »

  • May 2, 2013
  • 06:30 PM
  • 677 views

Elite journals: to hell in a handbasket?

by Hadas Shema in Information Culture

Once upon a time, journals were made of paper and ink. However, we left the dark ages of dead woods behind us and moved forward to an age in which authors don’t need to publish in journals (but still want to). There’s an increasing decoupling between the individual article and its publishing journal, created by [...]









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Vincent Lariviere, George A. Lozano, & Yves Gingras. (2013) Are elite journals declining?. ArXiv. arXiv: 1304.6460v1

George A. Lozano, Vincent Lariviere, & Yves Gingras. (2012) The weakening relationship between the Impact Factor and papers' citations in the digital age. ArXiv. arXiv: 1205.4328v1

  • April 22, 2013
  • 04:26 PM
  • 709 views

The Leiden University Ranking

by Hadas Shema in Information Culture

The new Leiden Ranking (LR) has just been published, and I would like to talk a bit about its indicators, what it represents and equally important – what it doesn’t represent. The LR is a purely bibliometrical ranking, based on data from Thomson-Reuters’ Web of Science database (there’s another bibliometrical ranking, Scimago, but it’s based [...]









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Ludo Waltman, Clara Calero-Medina, Joost Kosten, Ed C. M. Noyons, Robert J. W. Tijssen, Nees Jan van Eck, Thed N. van Leeuwen, Anthony F. J. van Raan, Martijn S. Visser, & Paul Wouters. (2012) The Leiden Ranking 2011/2012: Data collection, indicators, and interpretation. ArXiv. arXiv: 1202.3941v1

  • April 11, 2013
  • 09:54 AM
  • 727 views

May the odds be ever in your favor: academic tenure

by Hadas Shema in Information Culture

“Excuse me; the whole tenure system is ridiculous. A guaranteed job for life only encourages the faculty to become complacent. If we really want science to advance, people should have chips implanted in their skulls that explode when they say something stupid.” Sheldon Cooper, The Big Bang Theory Between the recent ACUMEN (academic careers understood [...]









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Abbott, A., Cyranoski, D., Jones, N., Maher, B., Schiermeier, Q., & Van Noorden, R. (2010) Metrics: Do metrics matter?. Nature, 465(7300), 860-862. DOI: 10.1038/465860a  

  • February 12, 2013
  • 11:45 AM
  • 649 views

Your theory is rubbish (but I won’t say it out loud)

by Hadas Shema in Information Culture

Science seems to be full of controversies and conflicts; famous scientists willing to kill and be killed for their pet theories, former students challenging the views of their academic “parents” and so on. My favorite biology professor used to tell about the time when his post-doc advisor, after a lecture given by his former post-doc [...]









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Brooks, T. A. (1986) Evidence of Complex Citer Motivations. JASIS. info:/

MacRoberts, M., & MacRoberts, B. (1984) The Negational Reference: or the Art of Dissembling. Social Studies of Science, 14(1), 91-94. DOI: 10.1177/030631284014001006  

  • January 1, 2013
  • 06:28 AM
  • 1,295 views

What’s wrong with citation analysis?

by Hadas Shema in Information Culture

What’s wrong with citation analysis? Other than your papers not being cited enough, what’s wrong with measuring scientific influence based on citation count? Citation analysis-based decisions concerning grants, promotions, etc. have become popular because, among other things, they’re considered “unbiased.” After all, such analysis gives numbers even non-professionals can understand, helping them make the best [...]









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MacRoberts, M., & MacRoberts, B. (1996) Problems of citation analysis. Scientometrics, 36(3), 435-444. DOI: 10.1007/BF02129604  

MacRoberts, M., & MacRoberts, B. (2010) Problems of citation analysis: A study of uncited and seldom-cited influences. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 61(1), 1-12. DOI: 10.1002/asi.21228  

Priem, J., Taraborelli, D., Groth, P., & Neylon, C. (2010) altmetrics: a manifesto. http://altmetrics.org/manifesto/. info:/

  • September 21, 2012
  • 04:11 PM
  • 997 views

On Authorship, Part I

by Hadas Shema in Information Culture

Most articles today are results of teamwork, whether it’s only two authors working together or thousands, (think CERN). As science keeps getting bigger, authorship no longer equals actual writing, but one way or another of contribution to team effort.  Authorship of massive scale, or “Hyperauthorship” (Cronin, 2001) is very common in high-energy physics and certain [...]









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  • July 28, 2012
  • 10:56 PM
  • 973 views

Self-citing bloggers: my research is the coolest thing ever (let me tell you all about it!)

by Hadas Shema in Information Culture

Every enthusiastic scientist knows that once you reach a certain level of specialization, there are very few people in your immediate surroundings that actually understand what you say. Eyes of family and friends get a bit glassy when you tell them about the SIR2 homologs, and nobody wants to look at your C. elegans’ baby [...]









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Shema, H., Bar-Ilan, J., & Thelwall, M. (2012) Self- Citation of Bloggers in the Science Blogosphere. To be presented at COSCI12, Dusseldorf, August 1-5. info:/

  • July 24, 2012
  • 05:27 PM
  • 1,062 views

On Self-Citation

by Hadas Shema in Information Culture

Self-citing is often frowned upon, being considered (and sometimes is) vanity, egotism or an attempt in self-advertising. However, everyone self-cite because sooner or later, everyone builds upon previous findings “Given the cumulative nature of the production of new knowledge, self-citations constitute a natural part of the communication process.” (Costas et al., 2010). The argument whether [...]









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Aksnes, D. W. (2003) A macro study of self-citation. Scientometrics, 56(2), 235-246. info:/

Fowler, J. H., & Aksnes, D. W. (2007) Does self-citation pay? . Scientometrics, 72(3), 427-437. DOI: 10.1007/s11192-007-1777-2  

  • June 24, 2012
  • 08:57 PM
  • 1,106 views

Understanding the Journal Impact Factor – Part Two

by Hadas Shema in Information Culture

Despite its many faults (see part I), the Journal Impact Factor (JIF) is considered an influential index to a journal’s quality, and publishing in high-impact journals is essential to a researcher’s academic career. Reminder: to calculate, for example, the 2010 JIF for a journal - JIF= (2010 citations to 2009+2008 articles)/(no. of “citable” articles published in [...]









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  • May 21, 2012
  • 09:37 PM
  • 793 views

Discussion of scholarly information in research blogs

by Hadas Shema in Information Culture

Discussion of scholarly information in research blogs As some of you know,  Mike Thelwall, Judit Bar-Ilan (both are my dissertation advisors) and myself published an article called “Research Blogs and the Discussion of Scholarly Information” in PLoS One. Many people showed interest in the article, and I thought I’d write a “director’s commentary” post. Naturally, [...]









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Groth, P., & Gurney, T. (2010) Studying Scientific Discourse on the Web Using Bibliometrics: A Chemistry Blogging Case Study. Proceedings of the WEbSci10: Extending the Frontiers of Society On-Line. info:/

  • May 7, 2012
  • 12:31 PM
  • 1,175 views

Understanding the Journal Impact Factor – Part One

by Hadas Shema in Information Culture

The journals in which scientists publish can make or break their career.  A scientist must publish in “leading” journals, with high Journal Impact Factor (JIF), (you can see it presented proudly on high-impact journals’ websites). The JIF has gone popular partly because it gives an “objective” measure of a journal’s quality and partly because it’s [...]









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Bar-Ilan, J. (2012) Journal report card. Scientometrics. DOI: 10.1007/s11192-012-0671-3  

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