Doug Keene

328 posts · 421,134 views

Doug Keene has a doctoral degree in Psychology and has worked as a trial consultant for the past 15 years. He is Past President of the American Society of Trial Consultants and has a full-service trial consulting practice. Twitter: @keenetrial

The Jury Room
328 posts

Sort by Latest Post, Most Popular

View by Condensed, Full

  • August 15, 2012
  • 08:02 AM
  • 1,320 views

“The Ideal Man” & ticking off Gen X male consumers

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

“The Player”, “The Beer Drinker” and “The Buddy”. These are tried and true “ideal male images” used by advertisers to attract men to their products and brand. Apparently, it’s not working so well anymore. Researchers say advertisers may need to incorporate “The Dad”, “The Husband” and “The Handyman” or even, “The Mentor” to avoid alienating [...]
No related posts.... Read more »

Linda Tuncay Zayer, & Stacy Neier. (2011) An exploration of men's brand relationships. Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal. DOI: 10.1108/13522751111099337  

  • August 10, 2012
  • 08:02 AM
  • 672 views

Simple Jury Persuasion: Telling jurors where to look

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

We’ve written recently about the value of using “human parts” in graphics to direct the jurors eyes. It was a simple lesson. Reality, alas, appears to be more complex. New research says gender matters in terms of gaze direction. That is, men and women focus on different things and are distracted by different things when [...]
No related posts.... Read more »

  • August 6, 2012
  • 08:02 AM
  • 691 views

Judging books by their cover: More on facial clues to character

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Last fall we wrote about facial disfiguration and disgust. As the elections come ever closer, research on assessing character via facial cues is making itself known in the popular media. We all look and judge but we don’t often talk about how we make assumptions based on superficial realities. Recently the Subliminal blog over at Psychology [...]
No related posts.... Read more »

Spezio ML, Rangel A, Alvarez RM, O'Doherty JP, Mattes K, Todorov A, Kim H, & Adolphs R. (2008) A neural basis for the effect of candidate appearance on election outcomes. Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, 3(4), 344-52. PMID: 19015087  

  • August 1, 2012
  • 08:02 AM
  • 951 views

Men: Exude confidence, masculinity, authority, and power!

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Toupees and hair transplants are out. And comb-overs were always out. Now, the real man seen as having leadership potential shaves his head. Sure people will think you are [significantly] less attractive–but they will also think you are taller, stronger, older, more dominant and perhaps most importantly, more of a leader. The research we are [...]
No related posts.... Read more »

Mannes, Albert. (2012) Shorn Scalps and Perceptions of Male Dominance. Social Psychological and Personality Science. DOI: 10.1177/1948550612449490  

  • July 27, 2012
  • 08:02 AM
  • 1,094 views

Simple Jury Persuasion: “Personalized persuasion”

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

If you read our blog post on checking out jurors’ shoes as part of jury selection, then you understand the longing for a silver bullet in voir dire. It’s like the litigation advocacy version of the quest for the holy grail. You know we didn’t think much of that shoe study for selecting or deselecting your [...]
No related posts.... Read more »

  • July 23, 2012
  • 08:02 AM
  • 628 views

What plaintiffs have known for years: “First is best”

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

It’s a long-standing truism. Plaintiffs have an edge with the jury because they go first. The defense has to convince those same jurors that the plaintiff story just isn’t true. What we know based on years of work is that the defense task is not at all impossible. But it can be harder. So this [...]
No related posts.... Read more »

Carney, DR, & Banaji, MR. (2012) First is best. PLoS ONE, 7(6). info:/

  • July 11, 2012
  • 08:02 AM
  • 845 views

Nice guys really do finish last! (Or at least–not at the top.)

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Another of those lessons on how life just isn’t fair. Apparently there is a collective belief among some (although not universal) that groups reward altruistic behavior by giving people showing altruism positions of leadership, higher rank, recognition, or simple respect. In other words, status is given to the altruist. This belief system fails to explain [...]
No related posts.... Read more »

  • July 4, 2012
  • 08:02 AM
  • 1,292 views

Real men don’t make mistakes

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

We’ve written before about the hazards of being a woman in a gender-incongruent career [like construction]. If you make a mistake, your credibility plummets beyond recovery.  New research says men suffer this same fate, but for them, it’s bad if they make a mistake in a gender-congruent career [like construction], too. If a woman in [...]
No related posts.... Read more »

Thoroughgood, CN, Sawyer, KB, & Hunter, ST. (2012) Real men don’t make mistakes: Investigating the effects of leader gender, error type, and the occupational context on leader error perceptions. . Journal of Business Psychology. info:/

  • June 29, 2012
  • 08:02 AM
  • 801 views

I have good reasons for what I do! You’re just a bad person!

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Ah–the fundamental attribution error. My behavior is explained by situations while yours is explained by your disposition. A simple example: “If Alice saw Bob trip over a rock and fall, Alice might consider Bob to be clumsy or careless (dispositional). If Alice tripped over the same rock herself, she would be more likely to blame the [...]
No related posts.... Read more »

Tarrant, M., Branscombe, NR, Warner, RH, & Weston, D. (2012) Social identity and perceptions of torture: It’s moral when we do it. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology., 513-518. info:/

  • June 25, 2012
  • 08:02 AM
  • 859 views

“Wide-faced men are going to lie and cheat”

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

We’ve read about aggressive men with thick necks and wide faces. We often suspect them of being violent thugs. Some, more charitably, might opine they are simply more confident and assertive. Or maybe weight-lifters. New research says they are also likely liars and cheaters. Seriously? We all have biases and use stereotypes to make snap judgments [...]
No related posts.... Read more »

  • June 20, 2012
  • 08:02 AM
  • 961 views

Should you meet with that prospective client first or last?

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Many of us are familiar with the recency effect (which would say be the last meeting) and the primacy effect (which would say don’t be last, be first). This body of research is also sometimes referred to as the “serial position effect” (which basically says, whatever you do, don’t get lost in the middle). Much of the research [...]
No related posts.... Read more »

Simonsohn U., & Gino, F. (2012) Daily Horizons: Evidence of Narrow Bracketing in Judgment from 10 years of MBA-admission Interviews. Psychological Science. info:/

  • June 4, 2012
  • 08:02 AM
  • 1,340 views

Should political orientation matter in voir dire?

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

The answer is, “sometimes”. Ultimately, we all tend to favor the side that appears to reflect our values. When jury issues are values driven (often the case) and politics are values driven (as politicians would like us to believe) there can be a nexus. We see and judge the world based on whether it appears [...]
No related posts.... Read more »

  • June 1, 2012
  • 08:02 AM
  • 1,247 views

Do great liars know how to tell if you’re lying to them? (Yes, they do!)

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

“Don’t kid a kidder.” It’s a nice way of saying, “don’t lie to a liar”. We all think we are better than most others at identifying deception and generally–we’re only deceiving ourselves in this belief. But here’s a terrific way to become a terrific deception detector: polish up your skills as a liar! Researchers invited participants [...]
No related posts.... Read more »

  • May 18, 2012
  • 08:02 AM
  • 910 views

You don’t have to drink to show intoxicated recall and behavior!

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Last year we blogged about a surprising study showing the recall accuracy of intoxicated witnesses. In that study, research participants who’d been drinking were just as accurate as sober research participants in describing events they had observed. New research, however, aligns more with what we expected regarding perceptual impairment from drinking. Well, sort of… What the research [...]
Related posts:
Arkansas: If a judge calls you a ‘slut’ in open court, it doesn’t show prejudice........ Read more »

Stepanova, E., Bartholow, B., Saults, J., & Friedman, R. (2012) Alcohol-related cues promote automatic racial bias. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology. DOI: 10.1016/j.jesp.2012.02.006  

  • May 14, 2012
  • 08:02 AM
  • 680 views

Nice guys and gals: How much we both get paid

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

So–is it better to be ‘nice’ or ‘mean’ when it comes to salary? We’ll disclose right up front that this is not a feel good post for some of you. As it happens, if you are someone high in agreeableness, (aka ‘nice’) you are likely paid less than someone less agreeable (aka ‘nasty’). There are [...]
No related posts.... Read more »

  • May 9, 2012
  • 08:02 AM
  • 1,031 views

The foreign-language effect: ESL Jurors

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

We’ve seen multiple examples of jurors being excused because they learned English as a second language (ESL) and their English is limited. But new research shows us that there may be an advantage to the juror thinking in English when it is their second language. Researchers were interested in if and how the use of a [...]
No related posts.... Read more »

  • May 4, 2012
  • 08:02 AM
  • 1,327 views

Simple Jury Persuasion: The “turban effect”

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Yes, we know. You get this. Since 9-11-2001, we are all wary of Muslims and other turban-wearing people [who, after all, must be Muslim]. Regardless of the (in)accuracy of this perspective, it is prevalent and seemingly hard-wired in our brains. All the “true Islam does not condone violence” clarifications in the world do not seem to [...]
No related posts.... Read more »

  • April 30, 2012
  • 08:02 AM
  • 1,265 views

An update on disrupting suspicion of atheists

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

We’ve written a number of times about atheists in the courtroom and the general lack of trust in atheists in this country. One recent study pointed out we trust atheists about as much as we trust rapists! Identifying biases that are deep-seated and seem to be permanent is one of the things we do as trial consultants. [...]
Related posts:
Everyone knows you just can’t trust an atheist!
You’re on trial: Is it better to be an atheist or a black radical Muslim lesbian?
Neurolaw Update: Who........ Read more »

  • April 25, 2012
  • 08:02 AM
  • 1,538 views

Everyday racism at work: Hope for African American Women?

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Black women are expected to behave like white men when they have reached a higher level of leadership. That is the conclusion of new research looking at black women leaders. Traditionally, white men are expected to be assertive and even aggressive leaders, but black men and white women are often perceived negatively for those sorts [...]
No related posts.... Read more »

  • April 20, 2012
  • 08:02 AM
  • 727 views

When good leadership goes wrong

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Monty Python fans recall the optimistic pluckiness of the black knight who threatens King Arthur even after being completely de-limbed. “It’s only a flesh wound!” he chirps and asks Arthur to walk over to where the knight has fallen so he can bite King Arthur’s legs. King Arthur refers to him as a “lunatic” but also [...]
No related posts.... Read more »

Conger, J. (1990) The dark side of leadership. Organizational Dynamics, 19(2), 44-55. DOI: 10.1016/0090-2616(90)90070-6  

join us!

Do you write about peer-reviewed research in your blog? Use ResearchBlogging.org to make it easy for your readers — and others from around the world — to find your serious posts about academic research.

If you don't have a blog, you can still use our site to learn about fascinating developments in cutting-edge research from around the world.

Register Now

Research Blogging is powered by SRI Technology.

To learn more, visit http://selfregulationinstitute.org/.