Erin Campbell

303 posts · 229,344 views

the Node
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HighMag Blog
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  • March 26, 2015
  • 02:42 PM
  • 248 views

March 26, 2015

by Erin Campbell in HighMag Blog

The actin cytoskeleton at the leading edge of a crawling cell has been a source of both scientific fascination and stunning images for biologists. Today’s image is from a paper that sheds light on how that complex structure is generated. The outermost region of a crawling cell’s cortex is called the lamellipodium, and it depends on a complex actin cytoskeleton for its structure and rapid dynamics. The generation of branched actin filaments at lamellipodia requires the activity of the ........ Read more »

  • February 20, 2015
  • 02:42 PM
  • 207 views

February 20, 2015

by Erin Campbell in HighMag Blog

Even the simplest and most elegant song or painting still has a complicated story behind it. That’s what I’m thinking about as I read about cilia today. Cilia are simple and beautiful, but the axonemal structure of cilia is far more complex than one might first appreciate. Today’s image is from a paper describing a protein required for one of the ciliary radial spokes. Motile cilia are structures on the surface of some microscopic organisms and certain types of cells, and function ........ Read more »

Vasudevan, K., Song, K., Alford, L., Sale, W., Dymek, E., Smith, E., Hennessey, T., Joachimiak, E., Urbanska, P., Wloga, D.... (2014) FAP206 is a microtubule-docking adapter for ciliary radial spoke 2 and dynein c. Molecular Biology of the Cell, 26(4), 696-710. DOI: 10.1091/mbc.E14-11-1506  

  • February 12, 2015
  • 02:17 PM
  • 203 views

February 12, 2015

by Erin Campbell in HighMag Blog

Biologists have to wear many hats, and one under-appreciated hat is that of marketing executive. You have to properly name whatever process/protein/structure you just identified so it will be easily remembered. Whoever coined the term “invadopodia” was spot-on….the term is informative, catchy, and ignites my imagination of what it’s like inside a cell. Today’s image is from a fascinating paper on invadopodia formation. Invadopodia are dynamic protrusions of plasma membrane that loca........ Read more »

Artym, V., Swatkoski, S., Matsumoto, K., Campbell, C., Petrie, R., Dimitriadis, E., Li, X., Mueller, S., Bugge, T., Gucek, M.... (2015) Dense fibrillar collagen is a potent inducer of invadopodia via a specific signaling network. originally published in the Journal of Cell Biology, 208(3), 331-350. DOI: 10.1083/jcb.201405099  

  • January 9, 2015
  • 12:06 PM
  • 255 views

January 8, 2015

by Erin Campbell in HighMag Blog

If you are lucky in life, there is at least one person who will always be there for you—a parent, your spouse, maybe even your pooch. As we understand more and more of what goes on inside a cell, it has become clear that actin is always there for the cell’s many organelles. Actin is so supportive and encouraging, and without it our cells would just be puddles of fats and proteins. Today’s images are from a paper describing the role of actin in mitochondrial fission. Mitochondria ar........ Read more »

  • December 19, 2014
  • 02:24 PM
  • 267 views

December 18, 2014

by Erin Campbell in HighMag Blog

You might not want the dreaded tube socks in your Christmas stocking this year, but you do appreciate the actual tubes that your body depends on in just about every organ system. A recent paper in PLOS Biology describes tube formation in the fly renal system and the signals that regulate it. Tubes generally start as buds that dramatically elongate during development, but the cell rearrangements that occur during tubulogenesis are not completely understood. Saxena and colleagues recently used th........ Read more »

  • November 26, 2014
  • 07:23 AM
  • 295 views

November 26, 2014

by Erin Campbell in HighMag Blog

 Patterns are soothing for left-brained folks like me, with the exception being those terrible patterned holiday sweaters that will come out of mothball-ridden closets soon (unsettling for everyone, really). Today’s images are from a paper describing a new micropatterning technique to look at plasma membrane proteins. The plasma membrane of a cell is riddled with many multi-protein complexes that facilitate communication and transport. These complexes provide a challenge to biologi........ Read more »

Lochte, S., Waichman, S., Beutel, O., You, C., & Piehler, J. (2014) Live cell micropatterning reveals the dynamics of signaling complexes at the plasma membrane. originally published in the Journal of Cell Biology, 207(3), 407-418. DOI: 10.1083/jcb.201406032  

  • November 19, 2014
  • 09:56 AM
  • 276 views

November 19, 2014

by Erin Campbell in HighMag Blog

You might not be able to get rid of the bad guys, but you can still win the battle if you cripple their mobility. Today’s image is from a paper describing how a tumor’s microenvironment can predict the motility of individual tumor cells. Metastasis is the spread of cancer cells throughout the body. The motility of tumor cells depends on the microenvironment around them, and a recent paper systematically looks at how that microenvironment can predict or alter the behavior of tumor cells. ........ Read more »

  • November 12, 2014
  • 06:27 AM
  • 253 views

November 12, 2014

by Erin Campbell in HighMag Blog

You might think that the “kiss-and-hop” is a dance move strictly forbidden at a Duggar homeschool prom, but it refers to the quick dynamics of the microtubule-associated protein tau. Today’s image is from a paper describing unexpected results about how tau resides on and regulate microtubules without physically impeding microtubule motors. The microtubule-associate protein tau binds to and stabilizes the microtubules within an axon. As most tau is believed to decorate axonal microtu........ Read more »

Janning, D., Igaev, M., Sundermann, F., Bruhmann, J., Beutel, O., Heinisch, J., Bakota, L., Piehler, J., Junge, W., & Brandt, R. (2014) Single-molecule tracking of tau reveals fast kiss-and-hop interaction with microtubules in living neurons. Molecular Biology of the Cell, 25(22), 3541-3551. DOI: 10.1091/mbc.E14-06-1099  

  • October 29, 2014
  • 12:59 PM
  • 272 views

October 28, 2014

by Erin Campbell in HighMag Blog

If you’ve ever tried to get your kids to share a donut, you understand the importance to dividing things equally (and learning crucial lessons…just buy more donuts next time...I mean, seriously!). Cell division is no different—chromosomes and organelles must all get divided equally. Today’s images are from a paper showing how mitochondria are positioned during cell division in order to allow equal segregation.Many years of research have focused on the equal segregation of chromosomes d........ Read more »

  • October 24, 2014
  • 11:22 AM
  • 290 views

October 24, 2014

by Erin Campbell in HighMag Blog

There is a party going on at the ends of microtubules, but I wasn’t invited. That won’t stop me, or countless cell biologists out there, from peeping in the window to check out all of the microtubule shenanigans. Today’s image is from a paper describing how Doublecortin binds to microtubule ends.The plus end of a microtubule is the primary site for growth and shrinkage, and interaction with several microtubule-associate proteins. Different microtubule end-binding proteins may interact with........ Read more »

  • October 17, 2014
  • 11:40 AM
  • 290 views

October 17, 2014

by Erin Campbell in HighMag Blog

For years the prettiest cells to image were flat cells in a dish. Thanks to the tireless work of many, beautiful high-resolution images can now come from tissue in a living organism. Today’s image is from a paper showing improved techniques for imaging fine cellular processes within large volumes, from the lab of recent Nobel prize winner, Eric Betzig. A material’s refractive index refers to how light travels through it; the simplest example being how light bends when passed through wat........ Read more »

Wang, K., Milkie, D., Saxena, A., Engerer, P., Misgeld, T., Bronner, M., Mumm, J., & Betzig, E. (2014) Rapid adaptive optical recovery of optimal resolution over large volumes. Nature Methods, 11(6), 625-628. DOI: 10.1038/nmeth.2925  

  • October 9, 2014
  • 01:47 PM
  • 294 views

October 9, 2014

by Erin Campbell in HighMag Blog

As Tom and Jerry have proven time and time again, repulsive forces are serious business and highly entertaining. Today’s image is from a paper describing how different cell types repel one another to help create boundaries between tissues. The study of how cells adhere to or repel one another is an important field of study in developmental biology. Ephrin ligands and their respective Eph receptors trigger repulsive cues between cells of different types. Many different tissue types expr........ Read more »

  • September 25, 2014
  • 11:34 AM
  • 343 views

September 25, 2014

by Erin Campbell in HighMag Blog

While taking an awesome cell biology course in college, I was coming to terms with my mother’s recent ovarian cancer diagnosis. The scientist in my head couldn’t shake the curiosity about how my mother’s cells could have betrayed her so royally. This intersection of basic cell biology and cancer kick-started my interest in cell biology research. Today’s image is from a paper showing a role for the ARF tumor suppressor in maintaining chromosomal stability. THIS paper is one of the mil........ Read more »

  • September 17, 2014
  • 02:49 PM
  • 345 views

September 17, 2014

by Erin Campbell in HighMag Blog

All good things must end—even the focal adhesions that are so key to cell migration. Today’s notable image is the first live cell visualization of ECM degradation at focal adhesions, in a recent paper that reports the link between CLASPs, exocytosis, and focal adhesion turnover. Cell migration depends on the precisely-timed formation of focal adhesions (FAs) that link the crawling cell to the extracellular matrix (ECM). FAs serve as anchor points for the crawling cell, yet must later di........ Read more »

  • September 11, 2014
  • 03:28 PM
  • 346 views

September 11, 2014

by Erin Campbell in HighMag Blog

As your therapist likely tells you, understanding where you came from is key to accepting where you are now. Take that therapist’s task and multiply it by several million—you now understand the tough job ahead of developmental biologists trying to track cell lineages in complex organisms. Today’s colorful image is from a paper describing a new computational framework for reconstructing cell lineages. The successful tracking of cell position, division, and movement in a developing or........ Read more »

Amat, F., Lemon, W., Mossing, D., McDole, K., Wan, Y., Branson, K., Myers, E., & Keller, P. (2014) Fast, accurate reconstruction of cell lineages from large-scale fluorescence microscopy data. Nature Methods, 11(9), 951-958. DOI: 10.1038/nmeth.3036  

  • September 5, 2014
  • 11:08 AM
  • 314 views

September 5, 2014

by Erin Campbell in HighMag Blog

It is so nice to have a friend who truly complements you…someone similar to you, but different enough to pick up the slack of your own shortcomings. Today’s image is from a paper about the Laverne and Shirley partnership of Ena/VASP and mDia2. Crawling cells extend finger-like filopodia to probe the environment for cues and to establish adhesion of the cell to the substrate. Filopodia are composed of parallel bundles of actin that are quickly dynamic. Countless actin regulators affec........ Read more »

Barzik, M., McClain, L., Gupton, S., & Gertler, F. (2014) Ena/VASP regulates mDia2-initiated filopodial length, dynamics, and function. Molecular Biology of the Cell, 25(17), 2604-2619. DOI: 10.1091/mbc.E14-02-0712  

  • August 29, 2014
  • 01:31 PM
  • 306 views

August 29, 2014

by Erin Campbell in HighMag Blog

Stem cells in adults are responsible for tissue renewal and many cancers. So, the hunt for stem cells is important and has already been successful, with stem cell populations identified in countless types of tissues. Stem cells in the ovary, however, were shy to show themselves until a recent study using a marker for the Wnt protein Lgr5.In adults, stem cells are responsible for maintaining homeostasis during normal wear and tear of a tissue. The ovary and its ovary surface epithelium (OSE) expe........ Read more »

Ng, A., Tan, S., Singh, G., Rizk, P., Swathi, Y., Tan, T., Huang, R., Leushacke, M., & Barker, N. (2014) Lgr5 marks stem/progenitor cells in ovary and tubal epithelia. Nature Cell Biology, 16(8), 745-757. DOI: 10.1038/ncb3000  

  • August 26, 2014
  • 02:50 PM
  • 374 views

August 26, 2014

by Erin Campbell in HighMag Blog

If you have little ones in your house, you might assume that the phrase “randomly fluctuating forces” is referring to your home. This phrase actually refers to the background force in a cell coming from active and motor-driven cell processes. Today’s image is from a study that developed a way to measure these forces. Actin- and microtubule-based motors move many types of material around a cell to drive critical cellular events. These motor-driven movements and other active processe........ Read more »

Guo, M., Ehrlicher, A., Jensen, M., Renz, M., Moore, J., Goldman, R., Lippincott-Schwartz, J., Mackintosh, F., & Weitz, D. (2014) Probing the Stochastic, Motor-Driven Properties of the Cytoplasm Using Force Spectrum Microscopy. Cell, 158(4), 822-832. DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2014.06.051  

  • August 21, 2014
  • 10:48 AM
  • 429 views

August 21, 2014

by Erin Campbell in HighMag Blog

Microtubules are known for their fascinating dynamics, but some cellular processes require a more stable microtubule cytoskeleton. Thankfully, these stable, acetylated microtubules are just as photogenic as their non-modified microtubule pals. Today’s image is from a paper describing the role of the protein paxillin in microtubule acetylation. Crawling cells require coordination of adhesive forces, cytoskeletal rearrangements, and cell polarization. Cell polarization helps to direct newly........ Read more »

  • August 19, 2014
  • 12:18 PM
  • 346 views

August 19, 2014

by Erin Campbell in HighMag Blog

Think of life without tubes for a moment. Not only would our huge bodies cease to exist, but our homes’ plumbing would be a mess and my 5-year old’s marble run would be pretty boring. The formation of tubes during development is a fascinating topic. Today’s image is from a paper describing the role of endocytosis in seamless tube formation. The trachea of the fruit fly is a simple tubular system that functions as the respiratory system of the fly. The star-shaped tracheal terminal cel........ Read more »

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