neuroecology

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Neuroecology
73 posts

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  • March 29, 2017
  • 10:56 AM
  • 275 views

The retina receives signals from all over the brain, and that is kind of weird

by neuroecology in Neuroecology

As a neuroscientist, when I think of the retina I am trained to think of a precise set of neurons that functions like a machine, grinding out the visual basis of the world and sending it on to the brain. It … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • March 23, 2017
  • 10:59 AM
  • 131 views

Every spike matters, down to the (sub)millisecond

by neuroecology in Neuroecology

There was a time when the neuroscience world was consumed by the question of how individual neurons were coding information about the world. Was it in the average firing rate? Or did every precise spike matter, down to the millisecond? Was … Continue reading →... Read more »

Srivastava KH, Holmes CM, Vellema M, Pack AR, Elemans CP, Nemenman I, & Sober SJ. (2017) Motor control by precisely timed spike patterns. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 114(5), 1171-1176. PMID: 28100491  

Nemenman I, Lewen GD, Bialek W, & de Ruyter van Steveninck RR. (2008) Neural coding of natural stimuli: information at sub-millisecond resolution. PLoS computational biology, 4(3). PMID: 18369423  

  • August 3, 2016
  • 01:23 PM
  • 481 views

Your eyes are your own

by neuroecology in Neuroecology

This blows my mind. There is a technique that allows us to map the distribution of cones in a person’s eyes. You would think that there is some consistency from individual to individual, or that it would be distributed in … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • July 31, 2016
  • 12:20 PM
  • 561 views

Fun brain fact: 13 spikes per second is too much energy

by neuroecology in Neuroecology

I will admit I have never thought about the question: how many spikes is your brain emitting every second? And how many could it emit? Lucy notwithstanding, it is probably something less than ‘all of them’. Beyond the obvious “that is called epilepsy”, … Continue reading →... Read more »

Lennie, P. (2003) The Cost of Cortical Computation. Current Biology, 13(6), 493-497. DOI: 10.1016/S0960-9822(03)00135-0  

Hasenstaub, A., Otte, S., Callaway, E., & Sejnowski, T. (2010) Metabolic cost as a unifying principle governing neuronal biophysics. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 107(27), 12329-12334. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.0914886107  

  • May 12, 2016
  • 11:02 AM
  • 216 views

Sleep – what is it good for (absolutely nothing?)

by neuroecology in Neuroecology

Sleep can often feel like a fall into annihilation and rebirth. One moment you have all the memories and aches of a long day behind you, the next you wake up from nothingness into the start of something new. Or: a rush from … Continue reading →... Read more »

Hengen, K., Torrado Pacheco, A., McGregor, J., Van Hooser, S., & Turrigiano, G. (2016) Neuronal Firing Rate Homeostasis Is Inhibited by Sleep and Promoted by Wake. Cell, 165(1), 180-191. DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2016.01.046  

  • April 28, 2016
  • 11:30 AM
  • 582 views

Sophie Deneve and the efficient neural code

by neuroecology in Neuroecology

Neuroscientists have a schizophrenic view of how neurons. On the one hand, we say, neurons are ultra-efficient and are as precise as possible in their encoding of the world. On the other hand, neurons are pretty noisy, with the variability in … Continue reading →... Read more »

Denève, S., & Machens, C. (2016) Efficient codes and balanced networks. Nature Neuroscience, 19(3), 375-382. DOI: 10.1038/nn.4243  

  • October 8, 2015
  • 12:06 PM
  • 747 views

Behold, The Blue Brain

by neuroecology in Neuroecology

The Blue Brain project releases their first major paper today and boy, it’s a doozy. Including supplements, it’s over 100 pages long, including 40 figures and 6 tables. In order to properly understand everything in the paper, you have to go back … Continue reading →... Read more »

Markram et al. (2015) Reconstruction and Simulation of Neocortical Microcircuitry. Cell. info:/

  • September 25, 2015
  • 11:41 AM
  • 635 views

Your friends determine your economy

by neuroecology in Neuroecology

What is it that distinguishes economies that take advantage of new products from those that don’t? Matthew Jackson visited Princeton last week and gave a seminar on “Information and Gossip in Networks”. It was sadly lacking in any good gossip (if … Continue reading →... Read more »

Banerjee, A., Chandrasekhar, A., Duflo, E., & Jackson, M. (2014) Gossip: Identifying Central Individuals in a Social Network. SSRN Electronic Journal. DOI: 10.2139/ssrn.2425379  

Banerjee A, Chandrasekhar AG, Duflo E, & Jackson MO. (2013) The diffusion of microfinance. Science (New York, N.Y.), 341(6144), 1236498. PMID: 23888042  

  • August 5, 2015
  • 02:03 PM
  • 348 views

Clarity of thought, clarity of language

by neuroecology in Neuroecology

  Clarity of language leads to clarity of thought: this is the lesson of apply mathematics and logic to science. But even when we don’t have those tools, we can be careful about the words that we use when describing … Continue reading →... Read more »

Lilienfeld SO, & et al. (2015) Fifty psychological and psychiatric terms to avoid: a list of inaccurate, misleading, misused, ambiguous, and logically confused words and phrases . Frontiers in Psychology. info:/

  • July 20, 2015
  • 02:54 PM
  • 679 views

Rationality and the machina economicus

by neuroecology in Neuroecology

Science magazine had an interesting series of review articles on Machine Learning last week. Two of them were different perspectives of the exact same question: how does traditional economic rationality fit into artificial intelligence? At the core of much AI work … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • May 19, 2015
  • 12:30 PM
  • 714 views

When did we start using information theory in neuroscience?

by neuroecology in Neuroecology

This question came up in journal club a little while ago. The hypothesis that neurons in the brain are attempting to maximize their information about the world is a powerful one. Although usually attributed to Horace Barlow, the idea arose almost … Continue reading →... Read more »

Dimitrov, A., Lazar, A., & Victor, J. (2011) Information theory in neuroscience. Journal of Computational Neuroscience, 30(1), 1-5. DOI: 10.1007/s10827-011-0314-3  

MacKay, D., & McCulloch, W. (1952) The limiting information capacity of a neuronal link. The Bulletin of Mathematical Biophysics, 14(2), 127-135. DOI: 10.1007/BF02477711  

von Neumann. (1956) Probabilistic logics and the synthesis of reliable organisms from unreliable components. Automata Studies. info:/

  • February 27, 2015
  • 11:17 AM
  • 907 views

How Deep Mind learns to win

by neuroecology in Neuroecology

About a year ago, DeepMind was bought for half a billion dollars by Google for creating software that could learn to beat video games. Over the past year, DeepMind has detailed how they did it. Let us say that you were … Continue reading →... Read more »

Mnih V, Kavukcuoglu K, Silver D, Rusu AA, Veness J, Bellemare MG, Graves A, Riedmiller M, Fidjeland AK, Ostrovski G.... (2015) Human-level control through deep reinforcement learning. Nature, 518(7540), 529-533. PMID: 25719670  

Volodymyr Mnih, Koray Kavukcuoglu, David Silver, Alex Graves, Ioannis Antonoglou, Daan Wierstra, & Martin Riedmiller. (2013) Playing Atari with Deep Reinforcement Learning. arXiv. arXiv: 1312.5602v1

  • February 15, 2015
  • 01:09 PM
  • 664 views

Inequality in faculty placement

by neuroecology in Neuroecology

How does your PhD institution affect your chances at a faculty position? Across disciplines, we find steep prestige hierarchies, in which only 9 to 14% of faculty are placed at institutions more prestigious than their doctorate…Under a meritocracy, the observed … Continue reading →... Read more »

Clauset A, Arbesman S, & Larremore DB. (2015) Systematic inequality and hierarchy in faculty hiring networks. Science Advances. info:/

  • January 30, 2015
  • 11:45 AM
  • 565 views

Neanderthal neurograstronomy

by neuroecology in Neuroecology

There is a genetic basis to the food that we enjoy eating. Some people – which I call strange people – think cilantro has a strange, soapy taste at least partially because of a particular polymorphism in a odor receptor gene (OR6A2). The question … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • January 27, 2015
  • 10:44 AM
  • 707 views

How do we integrate information?

by neuroecology in Neuroecology

Left or right? Apple or orange? Selma or Birdman? One way to make these decisions is precisely what intuition tell us it should be: we weigh up the pros and cons of each choice. Then, when we have sufficient evidence for one over the … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • December 2, 2014
  • 11:35 AM
  • 868 views

No one will remember you because society doesn’t care

by neuroecology in Neuroecology

A few years ago I was in Washington DC and, being a bit of a tourist, I randomly picked up a fact card about one of our exciting presidents. Obviously the excitement mounted: who did I get? My best buddy … Continue reading →... Read more »

Roediger, H., & DeSoto, K. (2014) Forgetting the presidents. Science, 346(6213), 1106-1109. DOI: 10.1126/science.1259627  

  • November 5, 2014
  • 12:04 PM
  • 663 views

Where do people look? Where there’s information

by neuroecology in Neuroecology

1. BusinessInsider has a great collection of pictures tracking where people actually look when they see an image. (Big takeaway: men love to look at other people’s groins.) 2. Watch the video above: people generally look at the face of the … Continue reading →... Read more »

Najemnik, J., & Geisler, W. (2005) Optimal eye movement strategies in visual search. Nature, 434(7031), 387-391. DOI: 10.1038/nature03390  

Gallup AC, Hale JJ, Sumpter DJ, Garnier S, Kacelnik A, Krebs JR, & Couzin ID. (2012) Visual attention and the acquisition of information in human crowds. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 109(19), 7245-50. PMID: 22529369  

Watson KK, & Platt ML. (2012) Social signals in primate orbitofrontal cortex. Current biology : CB, 22(23), 2268-73. PMID: 23122847  

  • November 4, 2014
  • 02:28 PM
  • 703 views

How many smells can a smelly person smell? 1 trillion or 10?

by neuroecology in Neuroecology

Earlier this year, a paper in Science attempted to answer the question: how many smells can we actually smell? At least one trillion, they claimed. Recently, Markus Meister posted a paper on arxiv which made the bold claim that we can … Continue reading →... Read more »

Bushdid, C., Magnasco, M., Vosshall, L., & Keller, A. (2014) Humans Can Discriminate More than 1 Trillion Olfactory Stimuli. Science, 343(6177), 1370-1372. DOI: 10.1126/science.1249168  

Meister M. (2014) Can Humans Really Discriminate 1 Trillion Odors?. arXiv. info:/

  • October 31, 2014
  • 11:15 AM
  • 789 views

Canonical circuits in neuroscience

by neuroecology in Neuroecology

Gary Marcus, Adam Marblestone, and Thomas Dean have a nice perspective piece in Science this week on the atoms of neural computation (gated): One hypothesis is that cortical neurons form a single, massively repeated “canonical” circuit, characterized as a kind of a … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • October 3, 2014
  • 11:55 AM
  • 708 views

Tricksy insects sing a song of love and deceit

by neuroecology in Neuroecology

Beyond a spider snacking on an unfortunate fly, the social lives of insects tend to go unrecognized. Perhaps you notice all the ants marching in a line, or bees heading back to a nest, but it all seems so mechanical, so primal. … Continue reading →... Read more »

Nakano, R., Ihara, F., Mishiro, K., Toyama, M., & Toda, S. (2014) Double meaning of courtship song in a moth. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 281(1789), 20140840-20140840. DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2014.0840  

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