Usman Paracha

452 posts · 251,517 views

I am the owner and editor of SayPeople.com; Science, technology, research, business and Islamic blog. I completed my M. Phil. in Pharmaceutics in 2008.

SayPeople
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  • July 28, 2016
  • 12:48 PM
  • 329 views

Space disturbs the heart-related system and increases the chances of death

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

Main Point:

Deep space missions could increase the chances of cardiovascular diseases, thereby increasing the chances of deaths in astronauts.

Published in:

Scientific Reports

Study Further:

NASA’s Apollo program sent 9 manned missions and 24 astronauts above the low Earth orbit (LEO) during decades of 1960s and 1970s. Those missions also included Apollo 11, which was used to take Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin to the moon. However, it appears that such beyond Earth missions........ Read more »

  • March 11, 2016
  • 02:04 AM
  • 424 views

Science shows part of brain having an important role in violence

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

Main Point:

Violence and aggression is found to be related to a component of hypothalamus in the brain.

Published in:

Nature Neuroscience

Study Further:

In a number of experiments performed by researchers at New York University, researchers found that premeditated violence – bullying, stalking, and possibly sexual aggression – in mice model (and probably in human beings) develops in a particular area of the brain known as the ventrolateral part of the ventromedial hypo........ Read more »

Falkner, A., Grosenick, L., Davidson, T., Deisseroth, K., & Lin, D. (2016) Hypothalamic control of male aggression-seeking behavior. Nature Neuroscience. DOI: 10.1038/nn.4264  

  • March 10, 2016
  • 08:50 AM
  • 458 views

Date of birth has a connection to ADHD

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

Main Point:

Birth date of a child could play an important role in determining the chances of being diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

Published in:

The Journal of Pediatrics

Study Further:

In a recent study, researchers from Taiwan considered 378881 subjects in the age range of 4 to 17 years during the study period from September 1, 1997 to August 31, 2011. Those subjects in the study were enrolled from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Dat........ Read more »

  • March 4, 2016
  • 12:13 AM
  • 379 views

How to improve creativity?

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

Main Point:

Thinking like a stereotypical creative or imaginative person can help in improving creative thinking.

Published in:

PLoS ONE

Study Further:

Stereotypes are those, who embody a set type or image, i.e. they are well defined and rigid. They are often simple in nature having known set of rules, therefore it is possible for a person to think like them. The “Stereotype effect” is one of the highly studied psychological phenomena.

In a recent study from Univers........ Read more »

Dumas, D., & Dunbar, K. (2016) The Creative Stereotype Effect. PLOS ONE, 11(2). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0142567  

  • March 2, 2016
  • 03:36 AM
  • 417 views

Uploading new skills to the brain just as in “The Matrix”

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

Main Point:

One of the first studies to find that transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) can help in faster learning of new skills.

Published in:

Frontiers in Human Neuroscience

Study Further:

“The Matrix” is one of most popular science fiction movies of our time. It has many interesting concepts ranging from stopping bullets with the help of hands to transportation through telephones and learning new skills without going anywhere. This last thing has gotten at........ Read more »

  • February 29, 2016
  • 09:39 AM
  • 506 views

End of Universe – estimated earliest time

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

Main Point:

Universe would end earlier than the anticipated time for the Sun to burn completely.

Published in:

arXiv

Study Further:

Scientific observation of the stars and galaxies in our universe are showing that the universe is continuously expanding, and the rate of this expansion is continuously increasing. After looking at this continuous expansion, one of the suggested possibilities for the future is that, the stars would die, everything in the universe will drift out, and t........ Read more »

Jose Beltran Jimenez, Ruth Lazkoz, Diego Saez-Gomez, & Vincenzo Salzano. (2016) Observational support for approaching cosmic doomsday. arXiv. arXiv: 1602.06211v1

  • February 29, 2016
  • 03:37 AM
  • 339 views

Black and white may not be the same in the U.S. courts

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

Main Point:

In the U.S., black colored offenders may face more severe decisions as compared to white colored offenders.

Published in:

Journal of Quantitative Criminology

Study Further:

In a study, researchers tried to find the racial factors behind criminal sentencing in the U.S. They analyzed more than 17,000 decisions. They studied the flexibility of judges while sentencing decisions. Moreover, they collected data from South Carolina, where there were no sentencing guidelines. R........ Read more »

  • February 28, 2016
  • 09:42 PM
  • 523 views

Use of “Smart Cup” and phone camera in diagnosis of pathogens

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

Main Point:

A newly developed “Smart Cup” can detect disease-causing agents such as herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) with the help of smartphone camera.

Published in:

Sensors and Actuators B: Chemical

Study Further:

Many novel ways of detecting infectious diseases have been developed. Among those methods are nucleic-acid amplification-based diagnostics that are sensitive, rapid, and specific on one side, but expensive, and requiring extensive procedure and trained p........ Read more »

Liao, S., Peng, J., Mauk, M., Awasthi, S., Song, J., Friedman, H., Bau, H., & Liu, C. (2016) Smart cup: A minimally-instrumented, smartphone-based point-of-care molecular diagnostic device. Sensors and Actuators B: Chemical, 232-238. DOI: 10.1016/j.snb.2016.01.073  

  • February 22, 2016
  • 12:01 AM
  • 516 views

Every cell in the body may have a specific gender

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

Main Point:

Every cell in our body may have its own gender or sexual identity.

Published in:

Nature

Study Further:

Researchers from MRC Clinical Sciences Centre (CSC), based at Imperial College, London, recently worked on fruit flies, and found that the body parts may have their own sexual identity. They are of opinion that this gender difference between body parts raises the probability that men and women may require different treatments.

In the study, researchers were trying ........ Read more »

  • February 19, 2016
  • 03:06 AM
  • 365 views

Have an eye on your eyes…

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

Main Point:

Nearly half of the population of the world (approximately 5 billion people) would be shortsighted by the year 2050.

Published in:

Ophthalmology

Study Further:

According to a study by researchers from Brien Holden Vision Institute, University of New South Wales Australia and Singapore Eye Research Institute, about 5 billion people (constituting nearly half of the population at that time) would be the patient of myopia (a disease resulting in shortsightedness) by the yea........ Read more »

Holden, B., Fricke, T., Wilson, D., Jong, M., Naidoo, K., Sankaridurg, P., Wong, T., Naduvilath, T., & Resnikoff, S. (2016) Global Prevalence of Myopia and High Myopia and Temporal Trends from 2000 through 2050. Ophthalmology. DOI: 10.1016/j.ophtha.2016.01.006  

  • February 18, 2016
  • 03:11 AM
  • 422 views

Do not ever blame those lazy beings…

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

Main Points:

Lazy workers, in insect colonies, are very important for long-term sustainability of those colonies.

Published in:

Scientific Reports

Study Further:

Everyone knows that insects live in colonies; they work in societies, and they follow the rules of a good social order. They are very efficient in doing their work, i.e. collection of food. However, few people know that ant colonies have many inactive workers. Sometimes, the number of those inactive workers results in red........ Read more »

Hasegawa, E., Ishii, Y., Tada, K., Kobayashi, K., & Yoshimura, J. (2016) Lazy workers are necessary for long-term sustainability in insect societies. Scientific Reports, 20846. DOI: 10.1038/srep20846  

  • February 18, 2016
  • 02:39 AM
  • 353 views

Why we smile, when someone smiles in front of us?

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

Main Points:

We smile, when others smile, and we feel sad, when we see others feeling sad, because we are just trying to know their feelings by mimicking their expressions, involuntarily.

Published in:

Trends in Cognitive Sciences

Study Further:

Researchers have reported that almost all of the facial expressions are contagious, and everyone tries to copy or mimic the smiles or frowns (expressions) of other person while talking with him or her, because this copy of other’s ex........ Read more »

  • February 17, 2016
  • 04:57 AM
  • 474 views

Run (in a real meaning) to move away from cancer

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

Main Points:

Running (exercise) could reduce the growth of cancer, i.e. incidences of tumor and tumor size decrease because of running.

Published in:

Cell Metabolism

Study Further:

In a study, researchers worked on the mice model of cancer. They exposed the mice to cancer, and checked the affect of running (exercise). They reported in the study that the risk of cancer as well as its recurrence could be reduced by regular exercise.

Study shows that exercise helps in the reductio........ Read more »

Line Pedersen, Manja Idorn, Gitte H. Olofsson, Britt Lauenborg, Intawat Nookaew, Rasmus Hvass Hansen, Helle Hjorth Johannesen, Jürgen C. Becker, Katrine S. Pedersen, Christine Dethlefsen, Jens Nielsen, Julie Gehl, Bente K. Pedersen, Per thor Straten, Per. (2016) Voluntary Running Suppresses Tumor Growth through Epinephrine- and IL-6-Dependent NK Cell Mobilization and Redistribution. Cell Metabolism. info:/

  • February 17, 2016
  • 01:39 AM
  • 504 views

New model says that the Universe has no start and it existed forever

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

Main Points:

According to a new model, Big Bang never happened and Universe existed forever without any beginning.

Published in:

Physics Letters B

Study Further:

According to our present knowledge, Universe came into existence about 13.8 billion years ago. Before the existence of Universe, everything was in the form of a tiny point, which is also referred to as singularity. Therefore, it is assumed that everything in the Universe was present in that tiny point at that time. Then a........ Read more »

Farag Ali, A., & Das, S. (2015) Cosmology from quantum potential. Physics Letters B, 276-279. DOI: 10.1016/j.physletb.2014.12.057  

  • February 10, 2016
  • 02:19 AM
  • 413 views

Technically good news for paralyzed people

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

Main Points:

Newly developed paperclip sized, mind control device can be placed in the brain, and can be used to help the people with paralysis to walk again.

Published in:

Nature Biotechnology

Study Further:

Researchers from the University of Melbourne have developed a “REVOLUTIONARY” device, a “bionic spinal cord” that can be implanted in a blood vessel in the brain and can help patients of spinal cord injuries to move and walk without any outside assista........ Read more »

  • February 9, 2016
  • 06:27 AM
  • 585 views

Baby can see, what an adult can’t

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

Main Point:

Babies have an unusual ability to see those things and differences in pictures that are not visible to adults.

Published in:

Current Biology

Study Further:

In a study conducted by researchers from Japan, it has been reported that infants under 5 months of age have an ability to detect changes in pictures or images that are not visible to adults. However, this ability disappears rapidly, and infants in the age range of 5 months to 6 months are unable to detect image dif........ Read more »

Yang, J., Kanazawa, S., Yamaguchi, M., & Motoyoshi, I. (2015) Pre-constancy Vision in Infants. Current Biology, 25(24), 3209-3212. DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2015.10.053  

  • February 8, 2016
  • 04:31 AM
  • 476 views

A student with proper sleep performs better in school

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

Main Point:

Decreased or disturbed sleep can result in poor performance of students in school.

Published in:

Journal of Sleep Research

Study Further:

In a study, researchers from Norway (and their collaborators) worked on the affect of sleep duration and its pattern on the academic performance of adolescents in the age range of 16 years to 19 years. Researchers surveyed 7798 adolescents, of whom 53.5% were girls. In the survey, researchers asked them about sleep duration, its effi........ Read more »

  • February 5, 2016
  • 02:34 AM
  • 478 views

Good morning genes

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

Main Point:

Genes could help in determining whether a person likes to rise early in the morning or not.

Published in:

Nature Communications

Study Further:

Researchers, in affiliation with 23andMe, Inc. recently worked on the DNA of 89,283 individuals, and found that genes could show some specific variations more frequently in the people, who self-identify themselves as early risers or morning people. They found 15 different spots in the genetic makeup that can vary between morning........ Read more »

  • February 3, 2016
  • 09:11 PM
  • 588 views

Effect of mobile phone place and its use on fertility of men

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

Main Point:

Men who use mobile phone more frequently and place their phone close to their groin have higher chances of getting abnormal sperm concentration.

Published in:

Reproductive BioMedicine Online

Study Further:

Researchers have reported that male infertility constitutes about 30% to 40% of all infertility cases. They also reported that studies are showing continuous decline in semen quality since the start of the last century. One of the potential contributing factors in th........ Read more »

Zilberlicht, A., Wiener-Megnazi, Z., Sheinfeld, Y., Grach, B., Lahav-Baratz, S., & Dirnfeld, M. (2015) Habits of cell phone usage and sperm quality – does it warrant attention?. Reproductive BioMedicine Online, 31(3), 421-426. DOI: 10.1016/j.rbmo.2015.06.006  

  • February 3, 2016
  • 12:29 PM
  • 526 views

Gun-related murder rate in the U.S.

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

Main Point:

In the U.S., people face 25 times more chances of being killed by guns as compared to many other developed nations.

Published in:

The American Journal of Medicine

Study Further:

In a study on “violent death rates”, researchers have reported that the rate of gun-related murder in the U.S. is about 25 times higher as compared to 22 other high-income countries. Moreover, gun-related suicide rate in the U.S. is about 8 times more than other high-income nations;........ Read more »

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