GrrlScientist , GrrlScientist , GrrlScientist , GrrlScientist

218 posts · 335,202 views

GrrlScientist is the blog pseudonym for an evolutionary biologist/ornithologist who writes about E3: Evolution, Ecology and Ethology, and the subtle relationships between these phenomena, especially in birds.

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  • January 7, 2012
  • 05:12 AM
  • 1,129 views

Hamster power to help solve energy crisis? [video] | @GrrlScientist

by GrrlScientist in GrrlScientist

Children's pet hamsters can help solve the world's energy crisis! ... Read more »

  • January 5, 2012
  • 03:00 AM
  • 1,085 views

Indonesia's underwater masters of disguise [videos] | @GrrlScientist

by GrrlScientist in GrrlScientist

Meet the fish that mimics the octopus that mimics scary sea creatures... Read more »

  • December 23, 2011
  • 05:24 AM
  • 812 views

Hot? Or not? The economics of red-hot chili peppers

by GrrlScientist in Maniraptora

SUMMARY: Chilis that produce the hottest fruits grow best when they are given lots of water... Read more »

Haak, D., McGinnis, L., Levey, D., & Tewksbury, J. (2011) Why are not all chilies hot? A trade-off limits pungency. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2011.2091  

Tewksbury, J., Reagan, K., Machnicki, N., Carlo, T., Haak, D., Penaloza, A., & Levey, D. (2008) Evolutionary ecology of pungency in wild chilies. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 105(33), 11808-11811. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.0802691105  

  • December 22, 2011
  • 01:03 PM
  • 1,118 views

Hot? Or not? The economics of red hot chili peppers | @GrrlScientist

by GrrlScientist in GrrlScientist

Chilies that produce the hottest fruits grow best when they are given lots of water... Read more »

Haak, D., McGinnis, L., Levey, D., & Tewksbury, J. (2011) Why are not all chilies hot? A trade-off limits pungency. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2011.2091  

  • December 22, 2011
  • 03:46 AM
  • 747 views

The science behind Santa [video]

by GrrlScientist in Maniraptora

How does Santa visit billions of homes all around the globe in just one night? The last important scientific question in the world has been solved! ... Read more »

Billing, R. (2008) Harnessing the brane-deer. Nature, 456(7224), 1007-1008. DOI: 10.1038/4561007a  

  • December 22, 2011
  • 03:00 AM
  • 1,172 views

The science behind Santa [video] | GrrlScientist

by GrrlScientist in GrrlScientist

How does Santa visit billions of homes all around the globe in just one night? The last important scientific question in the world has been solved!... Read more »

Billing, R. (2008) Harnessing the brane-deer. Nature, 456(7224), 1007-1008. DOI: 10.1038/4561007a  

  • December 1, 2011
  • 01:52 PM
  • 854 views

The economics of tree swallow brood sex ratios

by GrrlScientist in Maniraptora

SUMMARY: Tree swallows reveal that brood sex ratios are an economic balancing act with far-reaching evolutionary consequences... Read more »

Renaud Baeta, Marc Bélisle, & Dany Garant. (2011) Importance of breeding season and maternal investment in studies of sex-ratio adjustment: a case study using tree swallows. Biology Letters. info:/10.1098/rsbl.2011.1009

Peter O. Dunn, Linda A. Whittingham, Jan T. Lifjeld, Raleigh J. Robertson, & Peter T. Boag. (1994) Effects of breeding density, synchrony, and experience on extrapair paternity in tree swallows. Behavioral Ecology, 5(2), 123-129. info:/10.1093/beheco/5.2.123

John P. McCarty. (2001) Variation in growth of nestling tree swallows across multiple temporal and spatial scales. Auk, 176-190. info:/10.1642/0004-8038(2001)118 [0176:VIGONT]2.0.CO;2)

  • December 1, 2011
  • 10:19 AM
  • 1,254 views

The economics of tree swallow brood sex ratios | @GrrlScientist

by GrrlScientist in GrrlScientist

Tree swallows reveal that brood sex ratios are an economic balancing act with far-reaching evolutionary consequences... Read more »

Renaud Baeta, Marc Bélisle, & Dany Garant. (2011) Importance of breeding season and maternal investment in studies of sex-ratio adjustment: a case study using tree swallows. Biology Letters. info:/10.1098/rsbl.2011.1009

Peter O. Dunn, Linda A. Whittingham, Jan T. Lifjeld, Raleigh J. Robertson, & Peter T. Boag. (1994) Effects of breeding density, synchrony, and experience on extrapair paternity in tree swallows. Behavioral Ecology, 5(2), 123-129. info:/10.1093/beheco/5.2.123

John P. McCarty. (2001) Variation in growth of nestling tree swallows across multiple temporal and spatial scales. Auk, 176-190. info:/10.1642/0004-8038(2001)118 [0176:VIGONT]2.0.CO;2)

  • December 1, 2011
  • 03:59 AM
  • 505 views

Let's talk about evolution

by GrrlScientist in Maniraptora

SUMMARY: Prominent female role models in science and science communication talk about evolution and its importance to science, medicine and society... Read more »

Jon D. Miller, Eugenie C. Scott, & Shinji Okamoto. (2006) Public Acceptance of Evolution. Science, 313(5788), 765-766. DOI: 10.1126/science.1126746  

  • December 1, 2011
  • 03:00 AM
  • 960 views

Let's talk about evolution [video] | @GrrlScientist

by GrrlScientist in GrrlScientist

Prominent female role models in science and science communication talk about evolution and its importance to science, medicine and society... Read more »

Jon D. Miller, Eugenie C. Scott, & Shinji Okamoto. (2006) Public Acceptance of Evolution. Science, 313(5788), 765-766. DOI: 10.1126/science.1126746  

  • November 11, 2011
  • 06:30 PM
  • 637 views

Bird-friendly California vineyards may have fewer pests

by GrrlScientist in Maniraptora

SUMMARY: Insectivorous cavity-nesting birds can be encouraged to occupy vineyards by giving them nest boxes. New research documents that these birds reciprocate by providing significant eco-friendly pest control services to winegrape growers... Read more »

Julie A. Jedlicka, Russell Greenberg, & Deborah K. Letourneau. (2011) Avian Conservation Practices Strengthen Ecosystem Services in California Vineyards. PLoS ONE, 6(11). info:/

  • November 11, 2011
  • 04:10 PM
  • 1,080 views

Bird-friendly California vineyards may have fewer pests | @GrrlScientist

by GrrlScientist in GrrlScientist

Insectivorous cavity-nesting birds can be encouraged to occupy vineyards by giving them nest boxes. New research documents that these birds reciprocate by providing significant eco-friendly pest control services to winegrape growers... Read more »

Julie A. Jedlicka, Russell Greenberg, & Deborah K. Letourneau. (2011) Avian Conservation Practices Strengthen Ecosystem Services in California Vineyards. PLoS ONE, 6(11). info:/

  • November 8, 2011
  • 05:10 AM
  • 815 views

The seventh starling (Murmuration)

by GrrlScientist in Maniraptora

SUMMARY: What do particle physics, statistics and poetry have in common? (includes videos)... Read more »

Cavagna, A., & Giardina, I. (2008) The seventh starling. Significance, 5(2), 62-66. DOI: 10.1111/j.1740-9713.2008.00288.x  

Cavagna, A., Cimarelli, A., Giardina, I., Parisi, G., Santagati, R., Stefanini, F., & Viale, M. (2010) Scale-free correlations in starling flocks. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 107(26), 11865-11870. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1005766107  

  • November 8, 2011
  • 03:00 AM
  • 37,113 views

The seventh starling (Murmuration) [video] | @GrrlScientist

by GrrlScientist in GrrlScientist

What do particle physics, statistics and poetry have in common? (includes videos)... Read more »

Cavagna, A., & Giardina, I. (2008) The seventh starling. Significance, 5(2), 62-66. DOI: 10.1111/j.1740-9713.2008.00288.x  

Cavagna, A., Cimarelli, A., Giardina, I., Parisi, G., Santagati, R., Stefanini, F., & Viale, M. (2010) Scale-free correlations in starling flocks. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 107(26), 11865-11870. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1005766107  

  • November 2, 2011
  • 11:26 AM
  • 1,253 views

Hawaiian honeycreepers and their tangled evolutionary tree | @GrrlScientist

by GrrlScientist in GrrlScientist

Using a large DNA data set, researchers have identified the progenitor of Hawaiian honeycreepers and have linked the timing of their rapid evolution to the geological formation of the four main Hawaiian Islands... Read more »

  • November 2, 2011
  • 03:58 AM
  • 743 views

Scientists reach new heights with gecko-inspired robot

by GrrlScientist in Maniraptora

SUMMARY: Engineers finally succeed at building a robot that climbs smooth walls with ease and shuffles across ceilings without crashing to earth -- just like a gecko! ... Read more »

J Krahn, Y Liu, A Sadeghi, & C Menon. (2011) A tailless timing belt climbing platform utilizing dry adhesives with mushroom caps. . Smart Materials and Structures, 20(11), 115021. info:/10.1088/0964-1726/20/11/115021

  • October 25, 2011
  • 04:45 AM
  • 659 views

Jumping genes reveal birds and their sex chromosomes evolved together

by GrrlScientist in Maniraptora

SUMMARY: Avian retroposons -- "jumping genes" -- reveal that birds and their sex chromosomes evolved together, and provide us with important clues into the evolution of sex chromosomes and sex in general... Read more »

  • October 25, 2011
  • 03:00 AM
  • 3,673 views

Can a Siphon Work In Vacuo? [video] | @GrrlScientist | Punctuated Equilibrium

by GrrlScientist in GrrlScientist

Video proof that siphons do not require atmospheric pressure to suck... Read more »

Boatwright, A., Puttick, S., & Licence, P. (2011) Can a Siphon Work In Vacuo?. Journal of Chemical Education, 2147483647. DOI: 10.1021/ed2001818  

  • October 24, 2011
  • 06:39 PM
  • 599 views

Siphons really do suck

by GrrlScientist in Maniraptora

SUMMARY: Video proof that siphons do not require atmospheric pressure to suck ... Read more »

Boatwright, A., Puttick, S., & Licence, P. (2011) Can a Siphon Work In Vacuo?. Journal of Chemical Education, 2147483647. DOI: 10.1021/ed2001818  

  • October 14, 2011
  • 01:50 PM
  • 801 views

The birds and the trees

by GrrlScientist in Maniraptora

SUMMARY: Gray jays hoping to survive and reproduce during Canada's harsh winters must store food in the right kinds of trees ... Read more »

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