Ted MacRae

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  • February 17, 2012
  • 01:11 AM
  • 659 views

Tiger beetles in southeast Missouri

by Ted MacRae in Beetles in the Bush

Volume 43(3) of the journal CICINDELA was published a few weeks ago, and I can truly lay more claim to the issue than anybody else (except perhaps Managing Editor Ron Huber). In addition to having one of my photos (a face-on shot of Tetracha carolina) featured on the cover, I was coauthor on the first [...]... Read more »

Fothergill, K., C. B. Cross, K. V. Tindall, T. C. MacRae and C. R. Brown. (2011) Tetracha carolina L. (Coleoptera: Cicindelidae) associated with polypipe irrigation systems in southeastern Missouri agricultural lands. CICINDELA, 43(3), 45-58. info:/

  • December 11, 2011
  • 10:29 PM
  • 731 views

Swift Tiger Beetle: Species on the Brink

by Ted MacRae in Beetles in the Bush

Summary of a paper by Ted MacRae and Chris Brown on the historical and contemporary occurrence of the Swift Tiger Beetle, Cylindera celeripes.... Read more »

  • May 23, 2011
  • 12:51 AM
  • 1,248 views

Dromochorus pruinina is not extirpated in Missouri… yet!

by Ted MacRae in Beetles in the Bush

When Chris Brown and I began our study of Missouri tiger beetles back in 2000, our goal was simply to conduct a faunal survey of the species present in the state.  Such studies are fairly straightforward—examine specimens in the major public and private collections, and do lots and lots of collecting, especially in areas with [...]... Read more »

MacRae, T. C. and C. R. Brown. (2011) Distribution, seasonal occurrence and conservation status of Dromochorus pruinina (Casey) in Missouri. CICINDELA, 43(1), 1-13. info:/

  • April 18, 2011
  • 01:00 AM
  • 1,267 views

Rediscovery of Cicindela scabrosa floridana

by Ted MacRae in Beetles in the Bush

In refreshing contrast to the more usually heard reports of declining and extinct species, a new paper by Dave Brzoska, Barry Knisley, and Jeffrey Slotten (Brzoska et al. 2011) announces the rediscovery of a tiger beetle previously regarded as probably extinct.  Cicindela scabrosa floridana was described from a series of unusually greenish specimens collected in Miami, Florida in 1934; however, no additional specimens [...]... Read more »

Brzoska, D., C. B. Knisley, and J. Slotten. (2011) Rediscovery of Cicindela scabrosa floridana Cartwright (Coleoptera: Cicindelidae) and its elevation to species level. Insecta Mundi, 1-7. info:/

  • February 21, 2011
  • 01:14 AM
  • 1,411 views

Is Missouri’s disjunct population of Johnson’s tiger beetle extirpated?

by Ted MacRae in Beetles in the Bush

The December 2010 issue of the journal CICINDELA came out a little over a week ago. Leading off inside is the first in a series of papers that I, along with colleagues Chris Brown and Kent Fothergill, have prepared detailing our work with several species of tiger beetles in Missouri of potential conservation interest. At [...]... Read more »

Brown, C. R. and T. C. MacRae. (2010) Assessment of the conservation status of Habroscelimorpha circumpicta johnsonii (Fitch) in Missouri. CICINDELA, 42(4), 77-90. info:/

  • September 5, 2010
  • 03:06 AM
  • 1,263 views

Flaming the debate

by Ted MacRae in Beetles in the Bush

As my interest in prairie insects has increased over the past few years, so has my interest in their conservation. Many insects are restricted to prairies through dependence upon prairie plants or their unique physical and trophic characteristics. Thus, preservation of not only prairie plants but their insect associates as well is a major goal [...]... Read more »

Scott R. Swengel • Dennis Schlicht •, & Frank Olsen • Ann B. Swengel. (2010) Declines of prairie butterflies in the midwestern USA. Journal of Insect Conservation. info:/10.1007/s10841-010-9323-1

  • August 17, 2010
  • 11:57 PM
  • 875 views

Bruneau Sand Dune tiger beetles caught in the act!

by Ted MacRae in Beetles in the Bush

The newest issue of CICINDELA (“A quarterly journal devoted to Cicindelidae”) contains an interesting article by my good friend and fellow tiger beetle enthusiast Kent Fothergill, who presents a fascinating sequence of photos documenting a field encounter with a mating pair of the endangered Bruneau Sand Dune tiger beetle (Cicindela waynei) (Fothergill 2010).  This is one of [...]... Read more »

Fothergill, K. (2010) Observations on mating behavior of the Bruneau Dune tiger beetle, Cicindela waynei Leffler (Coleoptera: Carabidae: Cicindelinae). CICINDELA, 42(2), 33-45. info:/

  • June 24, 2010
  • 07:22 AM
  • 1,183 views

Nomenclatural changes in Phymatodes

by Ted MacRae in Beetles in the Bush

I’ve mentioned before the considerable taxonomic challenges facing students of the family Buprestidae (jewel beetles) in North America, owing largely to fact that more than half of its species are assigned to one of just three hyper-diverse genera (Acmaeodera, Agrilus, and Chrysobothris). New species continue to be described, but the most recent comprehensive treatments of [...]... Read more »

Swift, I. P. . (2010) Nomenclatural changes in North American Phymatodes Mulsant (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae). Zootaxa, 35-52. info:/

  • January 12, 2010
  • 01:17 AM
  • 979 views

Habitat Partionining in Tiger Beetles

by Ted MacRae in Beetles in the Bush

The latest issue of CICINDELA (December 2009, vol. 41, no. 4) contains an interesting paper by David A. Melius titled, “Post-monsoonal Cicindela of the Laguna del Perro region of New Mexico.” This paper continues a theme that I have touched on a few times in recent posts regarding the partioning of resources by multiple species [...]... Read more »

Melius, D. A. (2009) Post-monsoonal Cicindela of the Laguna del Perro region of New Mexico. CICINDELA, 41(4), 81-89. info:other/

  • January 12, 2010
  • 01:17 AM
  • 976 views

Habitat Partitionining in Tiger Beetles

by Ted MacRae in Beetles in the Bush

The latest issue of CICINDELA (December 2009, vol. 41, no. 4) contains an interesting paper by David A. Melius titled, “Post-monsoonal Cicindela of the Laguna del Perro region of New Mexico.” This paper continues a theme that I have touched on a few times in recent posts regarding the partioning of resources by multiple species [...]... Read more »

Melius, D. A. (2009) Post-monsoonal Cicindela of the Laguna del Perro region of New Mexico. CICINDELA, 41(4), 81-89. info:other/

  • July 17, 2009
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,572 views

Typocerus deceptus in Missouri

by Ted MacRae in Beetles in the Bush

Photographs and comments on the discovery of the rare longhorned beetle, Typocerus deceptus (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in Missouri.... Read more »

  • June 17, 2009
  • 01:57 AM
  • 1,517 views

Treatise of Western Hemisphere “Cicindelitae”

by Ted MacRae in Beetles in the Bush

Tiger beetles have long enjoyed a popularity that is disproportionate to their diversity, abundance, and economic importance relative to other groups of beetles. This seems as much due to their charismatic behavior – toothy jawed predators in extreme habitats – as it is to their brilliant colors, dazzling designs, and penchant for polytopism. Never before [...]... Read more »

  • May 15, 2009
  • 01:00 AM
  • 1,323 views

Saving endangered species with herbicides

by Ted MacRae in Beetles in the Bush

The latest issue of Cicindela (a quarterly journal devoted to tiger beetles), which arrived in my mailbox last week, features an article coauthored by my good friends Kent Fothergill and Kelly Tindall of Portageville, Missouri, along with lead author Stephen Bouffard of Boise, Idaho (Bouffard et al. 2009).  The article reports the results of a vegetative [...]... Read more »

Bouffard, S. H., K. V. Tindall and K. Fothergill. (2009) Herbicide treatment to restore St. Anthony tiger beetle habitat: a pilot study. Cicindela, 41(1), 13-24.

  • January 30, 2009
  • 01:21 AM
  • 1,748 views

Done with dung, meat please!

by Ted MacRae in Beetles in the Bush

“No feces for this species.” “Carnivorous dung beetle shuns dung and decapitates millipede.” “Little dung beetle is big chopper.” “Dung beetle mistakes millipede for dung.” These were some of the “catchy titles” that I had to compete with in coming up with my own opener for a remarkable beetle that titillated the [...]... Read more »

Trond H. Larsen, Alejandro Lopera, Adrian Forsyth, & François Génier. (2009) From coprophagy to predation: a dung beetle that kills millipedes. Biology Letters. DOI: 10.1098/rsbl.2008.0654  

  • January 9, 2009
  • 12:49 AM
  • 1,598 views

Review of Calodema and Metaxymorpha

by Ted MacRae in Beetles in the Bush

Insects are not only the most diverse group of animals in the world, they are also among the most beautiful.  Beetles, of course (with apologies to any lepidopterists that may be reading this), are responsible for a hefty slice of this majestic diversity, with the most spectacular of these belonging primarily to a few select families.  [...]... Read more »

  • November 28, 2008
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,880 views

Two new species of Agrilus from Mexico

by Ted MacRae in Beetles in the Bush

The enormous, cosmopolitan genus Agrilus (family Buprestidae - commonly called jewel beetles or metallic woodboring beetles) contains nearly 4,000 described species (Bellamy 2008). With many more still awaiting description, it is perhaps the largest genus in the entire animal kingdom (Bellamy 2003). Agrilus species are primarily twig and branch borers, utilizing recently dead... Read more »

  • November 17, 2008
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,741 views

A new species of Xenorhipus from Baja California

by Ted MacRae in Beetles in the Bush

A few months ago I discussed Trichinorhipis knulli of the tribe Xenorhipidini (family Buprestidae). Members of this tribe exhibit highly sexually dimorphic antennae, with the distal segments of the male antennae highly modified into a very extended flabellate or lamellate condition. The surfaces of the labellae/lamellae are covered with numerous, presumably olfactory sensillae that are... Read more »

  • October 23, 2008
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,373 views

New species and a review of the genus Tragidion

by Ted MacRae in Beetles in the Bush

Species of Tragidion are among the larger and more attractive cerambycids in North America, making them popular among collectors. Their bright orange and black coloration clearly functions in mimicking spider wasps (family Pompilidae) in the genera Pepsis and Hemipepsis - the so-called “tarantula hawks.” Unfortunately, species of Tragidion have been difficult to identify due to... Read more »

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