Post List

  • April 16, 2014
  • 01:54 AM
  • 1 view

Joined by HDAC (inhibitors)

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

I'm treading quite carefully with this post which came about following my [non-expert] reading of the paper abstract from Anand Venkatraman and colleagues [1] on a potential downside to the use of HDAC (histone deacetylase) inhibitors for treating spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1), a progressive disease affecting movement and other knock-on functions. This follows other work suggesting that certain HDAC inhibitors might offer some important new lines of investigation when it co........ Read more »

  • April 15, 2014
  • 08:00 PM
  • 5 views

New Study Shows Surgical Checklists In Operating Rooms Are Less Effective Than Assumed

by Jalees Rehman in The Next Regeneration

Optimizing such tailored checklists, understanding why some studies indicate benefits of checklists whereas others do not and re-evaluating the efficacy of checklists in the non-academic setting will all require a substantial amount of future research before one can draw definitive conclusions about the efficacy of checklists. Regulatory agencies in Canada and the United Kingdom should reconsider their current mandates. Perhaps an even more important lesson to be learned is that health regulator........ Read more »

Urbach DR, Govindarajan A, Saskin R, Wilton AS, & Baxter NN. (2014) Introduction of surgical safety checklists in Ontario, Canada. The New England Journal of Medicine, 370(11), 1029-38. PMID: 24620866  

  • April 15, 2014
  • 06:22 PM
  • 7 views

Hold the drill! Fracking emitting more methane than previously thought

by Jonathan Trinastic in Goodnight Earth

A new study measuring methane emissions over well pads has shown that fracking sites even in preparatory phases release orders of magnitude more methane then previously estimated.... Read more »

Caulton, D., Shepson, P., Santoro, R., Sparks, J., Howarth, R., Ingraffea, A., Cambaliza, M., Sweeney, C., Karion, A., Davis, K.... (2014) Toward a better understanding and quantification of methane emissions from shale gas development. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1316546111  

  • April 15, 2014
  • 02:17 PM
  • 8 views

Airborne Wind Turbines Have Significant Potential, Study Finds

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

Airborne wind turbines hovering high in the air and tethered to the ground, like kites, have the potential to generate huge amounts of electricity, based on a recent wind availability study led by the University of Delaware.... Read more »

  • April 15, 2014
  • 11:43 AM
  • 14 views

Religious Belief and Depression Resilience

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

Identifying risk factors for brain disorders is a key element in clinical research.Understanding protective or resilience factors for brain disorders is also important and receiving increased attention in clinical research.Factors that promote resilience to brain disorders may come from a variety of domains. Religious belief is one domain receiving attention as a potential resilience factor.Miller and colleagues recently published a longitudinal study of religious belief and risk for major ........ Read more »

Miller L, Wickramaratne P, Gameroff MJ, Sage M, Tenke CE, & Weissman MM. (2012) Religiosity and major depression in adults at high risk: a ten-year prospective study. The American journal of psychiatry, 169(1), 89-94. PMID: 21865527  

  • April 15, 2014
  • 04:37 AM
  • 27 views

A Brief History Of Lions

by Gunnar de Winter in United Academics

New DNA study reveals lion history and could guide conservation efforts.... Read more »

  • April 14, 2014
  • 10:51 PM
  • 34 views

Disordered Eating and Athletic Performance: Where’s the Line?

by Emma in Science of Eating Disorders


If a person severely restricts his diet and exercises for hours each day, he has an eating disorder. If another does exactly the same but it is because she wants to make the lightweight rowing team (which has an upper weight limit), she’s a committed athlete. When the two overlap, and an athlete presents with eating disorder symptoms, how do we distinguish between the demands of the sport and the illness?
I’ve been interested in the distinctions we make between disordered and n........ Read more »

  • April 14, 2014
  • 04:28 PM
  • 29 views

Scientists Gain Insight Into High-Temperature Superconductivity

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

In a new study by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, researchers have identified and solved at least one paradox in the behavior of high-temperature superconductors. The riddle involves a phenomenon called the “pseudogap,” a region of energy levels in which relatively few electrons are allowed to exist.... Read more »

  • April 14, 2014
  • 04:02 PM
  • 23 views

Mosquito sperm need to smell to swim

by Brooke LaFlamme in Molecular Love (and other facts of life)

You’ve probably had someone tell you, at some point in your life, that the sense of smell is the sense most tightly linked to memory. Now, scientists have found that at least for mosquitoes, the sense of smell is also linked to the ability of their sperm to swim. The research was published in February in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Female mosquitoes use their sense of smell to find people (so they can suck their blood) and suitable sites to lay their eg........ Read more »

Pitts RJ, Liu C, Zhou X, Malpartida JC, & Zwiebel LJ. (2014) Odorant receptor-mediated sperm activation in disease vector mosquitoes. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 111(7), 2566-71. PMID: 24550284  

  • April 14, 2014
  • 01:22 PM
  • 30 views

Right-Sizing U.S. Electrical Grid Could Reduce Blackout Risk

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

David Newman, a physicist at the University of Alaska, believes that smaller grids would reduce the likelihood of severe outages, such as the 2003 Northeast blackout that cut power to 50 million people in the United States and Canada for up to two days.... Read more »

Carreras, B., Newman, D., & Dobson, I. (2014) Does size matter?. Chaos: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Nonlinear Science, 24(2), 23104. DOI: 10.1063/1.4868393  

  • April 14, 2014
  • 01:10 PM
  • 59 views

Does Access to Birth Control Reduce Poverty?

by Eric Horowitz in peer-reviewed by my neurons

In American politics the proliferation of birth control is important because of how it affects the eternal resting place of our immortal souls. But believe it or not, there are also non-metaphysical policy consequences to increasing access to birth control. A new study by a pair of economists — Stephanie Browne of J.P. Morgan and […]... Read more »

Browne, S., & LaLumia, S. (2014) The Effects of Contraception on Female Poverty. Journal of Policy Analysis and Management. DOI: 10.1002/pam.21761  

  • April 14, 2014
  • 12:13 PM
  • 23 views

North Greenland Glacier Ice-Ocean Interactions 2014

by Andreas Muenchow in Icy Seas

I will travel to Spitsbergen in six weeks to board the German research icebreaker Polarstern. She will sail west across the Fram Strait towards northern Greenland where some of the last remaining glaciers exist that still discharge their ice via … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • April 14, 2014
  • 10:24 AM
  • 51 views

Some exploratory evidence that wait-list conditions may act as a nocebo in psychotherapy trials

by Kristoffer Magnusson in R Psychologist

The hypothesis that wait-lists could be nocebo conditions was investigated by Furukawa et al (2014). The authors performed a network meta-analysis of 49 RCT that involved cognitive-behaviour therapy for depression. ... Read more »

Furukawa TA, Noma H, Caldwell DM, Honyashiki M, Shinohara K, Imai H, Chen P, Hunot V, & Churchill R. (2014) Waiting list may be a nocebo condition in psychotherapy trials: a contribution from network meta-analysis. Acta psychiatrica Scandinavica. PMID: 24697518  

  • April 14, 2014
  • 09:23 AM
  • 42 views

Scientists Suggest Planting Biofuel Crops on Solar Farms

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

A new model for solar farms that “co-locates” biofuel crops and solar panels could result in a harvest of valuable plants along with solar energy.... Read more »

  • April 14, 2014
  • 09:12 AM
  • 50 views

Why Humanistic Psychology is Still Relevant

by Jeremiah Stanghini in Jeremiah Stanghini

The development of humanistic psychology began in the late 1950s and was ‘born‘ in the early 1960s. Given the time that humanistic psychology grew, there’s no doubt that it informed the civil rights movement. However, some say that humanistic psychology peaked in the 1970s. An … Continue reading →... Read more »

DeRobertis, E. M. (2013) Humanistic Psychology: Alive in the 21st Century?. Journal of Humanistic Psychology, 53(4), 419-437. DOI: 10.1177/0022167812473369  

  • April 14, 2014
  • 09:00 AM
  • 50 views

How practicing compassion alters the brain

by Katharine Blackwell in Contemplating Cognition

As tempting as it is to hope that one meditation practice could be a panacea within the mind – meditate, and become more mindful! improve your attention! cure your depression! notice when those around you need help! – I have to admit that I know the brain doesn’t work this way. The skills you practice are the skills you strengthen, and compassion in particular is a skill that requires more than just a general awareness of your environment.... Read more »

Weng HY, Fox AS, Shackman AJ, Stodola DE, Caldwell JZ, Olson MC, Rogers GM, & Davidson RJ. (2013) Compassion training alters altruism and neural responses to suffering. Psychological science, 24(7), 1171-1180. PMID: 23696200  

  • April 14, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 45 views

A new neurolaw caveat to minimize punishment

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Just say his brain made him do it! That is the conclusion of new research on the relationship between gruesomeness of the crime and the harshness of the sentence. In case you can’t intuit this one, the more gruesome (and disturbing) the crime, the harsher the sentence tends to be. But if the assault was […]

Related posts:
Neurolaw Update: Who’s in charge here—me or my brain?
When identifying punishment—will jurors focus on intent or outcome?
Simple Jury Persuasion: Anger + Disgust........ Read more »

  • April 14, 2014
  • 06:04 AM
  • 53 views

Interview with Beddington Medal winner William Razzell

by the Node in the Node

Each year, the British Society for Developmental Biology (BSDB) awards the Beddington Medal to the best PhD thesis in developmental biology. This year’s award went to William Razzell, who completed his PhD in Paul Martin’s lab at the University of Bristol. At the BSDB Spring Meeting last month, Will presented his thesis studies of wound […]... Read more »

  • April 14, 2014
  • 03:58 AM
  • 49 views

Neurology of inflammatory bowel diseases

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

The paper by Ben-Or and colleagues [1] talking about a neurologic profile present in a small participant cohort of children and adolescents diagnosed with an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) caught my eye recently. Their findings reporting that over two-thirds of their paediatric participant group diagnosed with IBD also "exhibited neurologic manifestations" provides some compelling preliminary evidence for further investigation in this area.Outside of reports of headache and dizziness, the pres........ Read more »

  • April 14, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 59 views

Time and Cost of Diagnosis for Symptomatic Femoroacetabular Impingement

by Meghan Maume Miller in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

Diagnosing labral tears with femoroacetabular impingement can be slow and expensive, it is important for health care professionals to quickly recognize and manage the symptoms.... Read more »

Kahlenberg, C., Han, B., Patel, R., Deshmane, P., & Terry, M. (2014) Time and Cost of Diagnosis for Symptomatic Femoroacetabular Impingement. Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, 2(3). DOI: 10.1177/2325967114523916  

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