Post List

  • August 3, 2015
  • 05:25 AM
  • 4 views

The smell of fish boosts our reasoning skills

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

The nose is an early warning system, urging us to look closer at what we are planning to put in our mouths. But it’s not just alerting us to questionable food. Past research using economic games has shown that when we’re suspicious of a smell, this emotion can spill into social situations, affecting how trusting we are towards others. Now a new study shows that even without the involvement of other people to trust or distrust, smell can make us suspicious of ideas and concepts – and this a........ Read more »

  • August 3, 2015
  • 02:34 AM
  • 7 views

Screening for autism in young children: 6 questions to ask

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Question 1: Does your child ever point with their index finger to ask for something?Question 2: Is your child able to imitate you or your actions, for example if you pull a face?Question 3: Does your child ever use pretend play, for example to talk on a phone or take care of a doll?Question 4: Does your child look at something across a room when you point to it?Question 5: Does your child understand what people say?Question 6: Does your child ever bring an object to you to show you something?The........ Read more »

  • August 2, 2015
  • 01:29 PM
  • 21 views

Perfectionism linked to burnout at work, school and sports

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Concerns about perfectionism can sabotage success at work, school or on the playing field, leading to stress, burnout and potential health problems, according to new research. In the first meta-analysis of the relationship between perfectionism and burnout, researchers analyzed the findings from 43 previous studies conducted over the past 20 years. It turns out perfectionism isn’t all bad.... Read more »

  • August 2, 2015
  • 09:54 AM
  • 15 views

A Close Look at the Connectivity of a Single Brain

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

In a new paper just out in Neuron, researchers Timothy Laumann and colleagues present an in-depth analysis of the functional connectivity of a single human brain.



The brain in question belongs to neuroscientist Russ Poldrack, and he's one of the authors of the paper. Poldrack was fMRI scanned a total of 84 times over a period of 532 days. The goal of this intense scanning schedule was to provide a detailed analysis of the functional connectivity of an individual brain.

Previous studies... Read more »

Laumann TO, Gordon EM, Adeyemo B, Snyder AZ, Joo SJ, Chen MY, Gilmore AW, McDermott KB, Nelson SM, Dosenbach NU.... (2015) Functional System and Areal Organization of a Highly Sampled Individual Human Brain. Neuron. PMID: 26212711  

  • August 2, 2015
  • 08:31 AM
  • 23 views

Blood Pressure Dippers May React Differently to Morning Blood Pressure Surge

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Prof. Sante D. Pierdomenico Associate Professor of Internal Medicine University “Gabriele d’Annunzio” Chieti-Pescara – Italy Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Pierdomenico: Though a peak incidence of cardiovascular … Continue reading →
The post Blood Pressure Dippers May React Differently to Morning Blood Pressure Surge appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Resea........ Read more »

Prof. Sante D. Pierdomenico. (2015) Blood Pressure Dippers May React Differently to Morning Blood Pressure Surge . MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • August 2, 2015
  • 08:13 AM
  • 16 views

Epigenetic Biomarker May Improve Cervical Cancer Screening

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Christos Nikolaidis Ph.D. Laboratory of Pharmacology Medical School, Democritus University of Thrace Dragana, Alexandroupolis Greece Medical Research: What is the background for this study? Response: Epigenetic changes are part of the natural history of cervical neoplasia. Tracking … Continue reading →
The post Epigenetic Biomarker May Improve Cervical Cancer Screening appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

Christos Nikolaidis Ph.D. (2015) Epigenetic Biomarker May Improve Cervical Cancer Screening. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • August 1, 2015
  • 08:42 PM
  • 32 views

The Idiosyncratic Side of Diagnosis by Brain Scan and Machine Learning

by The Neurocritic in The Neurocritic

R2D3R2D3 recently had a fantastic Visual Introduction to Machine Learning, using the classification of homes in San Francisco vs. New York as their example. As they explain quite simply: In machine learning, computers apply statistical learning techniques to automatically identify patterns in data. These techniques can be used to make highly accurate predictions. You should really head over there right now to view it, because it's very impressive.Computational neuroscience types are using machin........ Read more »

  • August 1, 2015
  • 01:58 PM
  • 32 views

Childhood cancer cells drain immune system’s batteries

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Cancer cells in neuroblastoma contain a molecule that breaks down a key energy source for the body’s immune cells, leaving them too physically drained to fight the disease, according to new research. Cancer Research UK-funded scientists have discovered that the cells in neuroblastoma – a rare type of childhood cancer that affects nerve cells – produce a molecule that breaks down arginine, one of the building blocks of proteins and an essential energy source for immune cells.... Read more »

  • August 1, 2015
  • 09:20 AM
  • 19 views

Genes May Explain Why Smarter People Live Longer

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Rosalind Arden Centre for Philosophy of Natural & Social Science London School of Economics London MedicalResearch: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Arden: We’ve known for a while that … Continue reading →
The post Genes May Explain Why Smarter People Live Longer appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

Dr. Rosalind Arden. (2015) Genes May Explain Why Smarter People Live Longer. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • August 1, 2015
  • 07:25 AM
  • 13 views

Patients With Blood Cancers May Need More Support At End Of Life

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Prof David C Currow Discipline of Palliative and Supportive Services Flinders University Adelaide, SA, Australia Medical Research: What is the background for this study? Prof. Currow: This study grew out of a desire to better understand the … Continue reading →
The post Patients With Blood Cancers May Need More Support At End Of Life appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

Prof David C Currow. (2015) Patients With Blood Cancers May Need More Support At End Of Life. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • August 1, 2015
  • 03:16 AM
  • 42 views

Methylphenidate: a repairer of the 'oxidative balance' in ADHD?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

A fairly quick post for you today based on the findings reported by Esra Guney and colleagues [1] who examined whether markers of oxidative stress - an imbalance "between the systemic manifestation of reactive oxygen species and a biological system's ability to readily detoxify the reactive intermediates or to repair the resulting damage" - might be something to look at when it comes to cases of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).They concluded that, based on a small-ish sample........ Read more »

Guney, E., Cetin, F., Alisik, M., Tunca, H., Tas Torun, Y., Iseri, E., Isik Taner, Y., Cayci, B., & Erel, O. (2015) Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and oxidative stress: A short term follow up study. Psychiatry Research. DOI: 10.1016/j.psychres.2015.07.003  

  • July 31, 2015
  • 02:33 PM
  • 63 views

Crystal clear images uncover secrets of hormone receptors

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Many hormones and neurotransmitters work by binding to receptors on a cell’s exterior surface. This activates receptors causing them to twist, turn and spark chemical reactions inside cells. NIH scientists used atomic level images to show how the neuropeptide hormone neurotensin might activate its receptors. Their description is the first of its kind for a neuropeptide-binding G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), a class of receptors involved in a wide range of disorders and the target of many d........ Read more »

  • July 31, 2015
  • 02:00 PM
  • 12 views

Cancer Drug Can Activate HIV Reservoirs To Target For Eradication

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Satya Dandekar PhD Professor and Chair Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology UC Davis Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Dandekar: Current anti-retroviral therapy is effective in … Continue reading →
The post Cancer Drug Can Activate HIV Reservoirs To Target For Eradication appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

Dr. Satya Dandekar PhD. (2015) Cancer Drug Can Activate HIV Reservoirs To Target For Eradication. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • July 31, 2015
  • 01:15 PM
  • 35 views

Modern Wireless Devices May Cause Excessive Oxidative Stress In Humans

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Prof. Igor Yakymenko Laboratory of Biophysics, Institute of Experimental Pathology, Oncology and Radiobiology NAS of Ukraine Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Prof. Yakymenko: We know a lot about … Continue reading →
The post Modern Wireless Devices May Cause Excessive Oxidative Stress In Humans appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

Prof. Igor Yakymenko. (2015) Modern Wireless Devices May Cause Excessive Oxidative Stress In Humans. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • July 31, 2015
  • 01:01 PM
  • 15 views

Biomarker S100B Can Help Rule Out Hemorrhage After Minor Head Injury

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Heinrich Thaler Trauma Hospital Meidling Vienna Austria Medical Research: What is the background for this study? Dr. Thaler:  An increased prevalence of minor head injuries in elderly patients combined with the frequent use of platelet aggregation … Continue reading →
The post Biomarker S100B Can Help Rule Out Hemorrhage After Minor Head Injury appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

Dr. Heinrich Thaler. (2015) Biomarker S100B Can Help Rule Out Hemorrhage After Minor Head Injury. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • July 31, 2015
  • 12:31 PM
  • 14 views

Insulin Resistance Linked to Poor Memory Performance

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Auriel A. Willette, M.S., Ph.D. Food Science and Human Nutrition Neuroscience Interdepartmental Graduate Program Gerontology Interdepartmental Graduate Program Iowa State University, Ames Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response: Obesity is … Continue reading →
The post Insulin Resistance Linked to Poor Memory Performance appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and New........ Read more »

Auriel A. Willette, M.S., Ph.D. (2015) Insulin Resistance Linked to Poor Memory Performance. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • July 31, 2015
  • 12:00 PM
  • 12 views

Mild Increase in Daily Sodium Increases Risk of Hypertension

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Tomonori Sugiura, MD, PhD Department of Cardio‐Renal Medicine and Hypertension Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences Nagoya  Japan Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Sugiura: Although … Continue reading →
The post Mild Increase in Daily Sodium Increases Risk of Hypertension appeared first on MedicalResearch.com Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

Tomonori Sugiura, MD, PhD. (2015) Mild Increase in Daily Sodium Increases Risk of Hypertension. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • July 31, 2015
  • 10:40 AM
  • 60 views

What Happens When People Text on an Obstacle Course

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish



Exercise scientist Conrad Earnest was dodging some oblivious pedestrians in England when inspiration struck. He was trying to walk down the sidewalk, but all around him people were weaving back and forth as they focused on their smartphone screens. Earnest suggested to two of his students that they study the dangers of texting while walking. Specifically, they could ask whether texters are more likely to trip and fall—perhaps wishful thinking on Earnest's part as he walked among them.

The... Read more »

  • July 31, 2015
  • 10:00 AM
  • 55 views

How to make rice healthier for you and the environment

by Betty Zou in Eat, Read, Science

An innovative way of cooking rice that removes more arsenic than the conventional method and a new strain of high-starch, low-methane rice are discussed.... Read more »

  • July 31, 2015
  • 08:03 AM
  • 52 views

What if There Were Live Music at the Doctor’s Office?

by Jeremiah Stanghini in Jeremiah Stanghini

There was a really interesting study published earlier this year that had live music in a medical waiting room. The aim of the study was to learn more about the staff’s perceptions of this live music, but as you might expect, the live … Continue reading →... Read more »

join us!

Do you write about peer-reviewed research in your blog? Use ResearchBlogging.org to make it easy for your readers — and others from around the world — to find your serious posts about academic research.

If you don't have a blog, you can still use our site to learn about fascinating developments in cutting-edge research from around the world.

Register Now

Research Blogging is powered by SMG Technology.

To learn more, visit seedmediagroup.com.