Editor’s Selections: Ice cream overload, sketchy blood pressure, aspertame and weight, gluten intolerance, and smoking bans

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By Dr. Peter Janiszewski

Each week, Dr. Peter Janiszewski selects several notable posts from Health and Clinical Research. He blogs at Obesity Panacea.

Here are some of the past week’s most intriguing discussions:

    Check back next week for some more riveting discussions of health and clinical research!

    Peter

    Editor’s Selections: Breast feeding, weight bias, ghostwriters, fMRIs, and more

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    By Dr. Peter Janiszewski

    Each week, Dr. Peter Janiszewski selects several notable posts from Health and Clinical Research. He blogs at Obesity Panacea.

    Here are some of the past week’s most intriguing discussions:

    Check back next week for some more riveting discussions of health and clinical research!

    Peter

    Editor’s Selections:Mahjong epilepsy, creatine stigma, bariatric surgery safety, exercise and appetite, high protein diets and bone health

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    By Dr. Peter Janiszewski

    Each week, Dr. Peter Janiszewski selects several notable posts from Health and Clinical Research. He blogs at Obesity Panacea.

    Here are some of the past week’s most intriguing discussions:

    • Mahjong epilepsy? Kevin Zelnio gives everyone a good reason to take it easy when playing mahjong. If you fail to heed Kevin’s advice, you just may end up having a seizure.
    • Creatine has been used as an ergogenic supplement by athletes for many years. Despite much evidence to the contrary, the supplement retains a heavy stigma in the popular press. Colby Vorland of Nutritional Blogma discusses the discrepancy between scientific evidence and naive hysteria.
    • Apparently, bariatric surgery is the second most common abdominal surgery in the US. Dr. Arya Sharma breaks down a recent JAMA study looking at the safety of this popular procedure.
    • Need another reason to go to the gym? Check out Greg Laden’s discussion of new evidence pointing to neuroendocrine mechanics by which exercise attenuates appetite, and how inactivity may increase it.
    • Low-carb/high protein diets; bad for your bones? Steve Parker of Diabetic Mediterranean Diet blog speaks on a new study which suggests the answer is a resounding “Nah!”

    Check back next week for some more riveting discussions of health and clinical research!

    Peter

    Editor’s Selections: Vodka Redbulls, Acupuncture, Female Orgasms, and Muscle Memory

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    By Dr. Peter Janiszewski

    Each week, Dr. Peter Janiszewski selects several notable posts from Health and Clinical Research. He blogs at Obesity Panacea.

    Here are some of the past week’s most intriguing discussions:

    • Have you ever wondered: what would be the effect of eating a Big Mac and following it up with a vodka and Redbull, specifically among Brazilian men? No, well some researchers thought it worthy of investigation. TwoYaks of Geneflow discusses this interesting study.
    • Scicurious of Neurotic Physiology talks female orgasms and ejaculation. Fascinating stuff that is sure to make you blush, and maybe have an orgasm… (sexy photos included).
    • The concept of muscle memory when concerning resistance training has always been thought to be of neural origin. Colby Vorland of Nutritional Blogma discusses a new study suggesting another important player in this physiological phenomenon.

    How is that for some cool science?

    See you next week for another installment.

    Peter

    Editor’s Selections: Dinosaur Bling, Historic Marine Biology, and Algal Theft

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    By Jarrett Byrnes

    smalljarrett2Jarrett Byrnes focuses on posts in ecology, environmental sciences, and evolution. He blogs at I’m a chordata, urochordata!

    • As a little tyke, I always thought dinosaurs with huge crests or sail adaptations for body cooling was awesome. Turns out, dinosaur sails, horns, and more might not be quite so PG.

    Editor’s selections: archaeoacoustics, baboon friendships, and the teapot effect

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    By Dr. SkySkull

    skyskull “Dr. SkySkull” selects several notable posts each week from a miscellany of ResearchBlogging.org categories. He blogs at Skulls in the Stars.

    • Echoes of the past. We begin with teofilo at Gambler’s House, describing fascinating speculation that the former residents of Chaco Canyon may have chosen the site for their home based on its acoustic properties.  (I’ve resolved to visit the site one day.)
    • “You just call out my name…”: Friendships in Male and Female Baboons. Male and female baboons have long been known to form friendships not related to reproduction, but why?  Brian at Laelaps discusses research done in Kenya to answer this question.
    • The teapot effect, end of. Finally, aimeew at misc.ience shows again how science, in this case physics, is constantly working to make our lives better!  Researchers have come up with a solution for “the teapot effect”; I’ll let you click through to the link to find out what that is…

    Check back next week for more miscellaneous highlights!

    List of blogs nominated for Research Blogging Awards

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    By Dave Munger

    We’ve had a tremendous response to the Research Blogging awards, with hundreds of nominations! Below is a list of the nominations so far. Check to see if your favorite blog is on the list, and if you don’t see it, head over to the Awards page and submit your nomination. You can also nominate your own blog. There are just six days left to nominate a blog!

    Read the rest of this entry »

    Interview with ResearchBlogging.org content editors

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    By Dave Munger

    Have you ever wondered how the ResearchBlogging.org content editors choose their weekly Editor’s Selections? Over on Seedmagazine.com, I interview four of our content editors to find out how they do it. They also look back at their favorite posts of 2009, and give some insight into the future of science online.

    Click here to read the whole interview on Seedmagazine.com

    Editor’s Selections: Stealth influenza, sperm wars, and living without a cell wall

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    By Vincent Racaniello

    Vincent RacanielloVincent Racaniello selects several notable posts each week from molecular and cellular biology and virology. He blogs at virology blog.

    • Every virus has some way of meddling with interferon pathways, and stealth influenza is no different
    • It may be a dog-eat-dog world out there, but nowhere is the competition fiercer than in the female reproductive tract
    • Finding a way to grow bacteria without a cell wall provides a glimpse into a world before these microbes evolved

    I’ll be back next Friday with more selections.

    Editor’s Selections: Leishmania in 1000 year old Chilean remains, the myth of chameleon camoflage, and a new anti-cancer role for p53

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    By Vincent Racaniello

    Vincent RacanielloVincent Racaniello selects several notable posts each week from molecular and cellular biology and virology. He blogs at virology blog.

    I’ll be back next Friday with more selections.

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