Editor’s Selections: Watching mutations as they happen, assasination or accident, and Listeria’s visiting card

Editor's Selections 1 Comment
By Vincent Racaniello

Vincent RacanielloVincent Racaniello selects several notable posts each week from molecular and cellular biology and virology. He blogs at virology blog.

  • A new method allows detection of DNA mismatches in the act of turning into mutations. It has been used to rule out the idea that a few cells in a bacterial population mutate much more frequently than the rest.
  • Kaposi’s sarcoma herpesvirus block MHC class I molecules, leading to immune evasion. HFE, an MHC class I molecule involved in the regulation of iron metabolism, is destroyed – but this might be a side effect, and not an attempt to influence iron availability.
  • Listeria, like many intracellular pathogens, induce the synthesis of interferon, leading to immune activation of the host cell. The bacteria are detected because they secrete cyclic-di-AMP. This is accomplished by efflux pumps that normally rid the cells of harmful compounds such as antibiotics.

I’ll be back next Friday with more selections.

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One Response to “Editor’s Selections: Watching mutations as they happen, assasination or accident, and Listeria’s visiting card”

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