Editor’s Selections: Bacteria that tear themselves apart, attack of the giant Archaea, and measles – not such a measly disease

Editor's Selections 2 Comments
By Vincent Racaniello

Vincent RacanielloVincent Racaniello selects several notable posts each week from molecular and cellular biology and virology. He blogs at virology blog.

  • An important protein involved in bacterial cell division is FtsZ, which separates one cell into two by forming a ring of protein around the middle. The discovery that certain Chlamydia do not encode FtsZ proteins lead to the finding of completely different mechanisms of cell division.
  • Archaea are under-rated. But they are everywhere, and have profound effects on our planet. They are unlike anything else on earth, and interact with other species. Learn about them!
  • Measles, caused by a virus, is one of the most contagious diseases known. It can have serious consequences, including death, which is why immunization to prevent infection is a very good idea.

I’ll be back next Friday with more selections.

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2 Responses to “Editor’s Selections: Bacteria that tear themselves apart, attack of the giant Archaea, and measles – not such a measly disease”

  1. Gene Hurrell Says:
    January 15th, 2012 at 8:11 am

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    October 17th, 2013 at 5:54 am

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