Post List

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,154 views

Can we ever read articles of the opposite political persuasion? An alternative model

by scritic in Cognitive Science and Human Activity

Describes a recently published research paper on a framework for presenting ideologically diverse posts to a reader in order to get a reader to read the opposite points of view. Presents an alternative theory on how we can make readers read articles of the opposite political persuasion.... Read more »

Sean A. Munson, & Paul Resnick. (2010) Presenting diverse political opinions: how and how much. Proceedings of the 28th international conference on Human factors in computing systems. info:/http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/1753326.1753543

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,637 views

New GPCR structure: CXCR4 Chemokine Receptor (HIV and cancer target)

by Peter Nollert in Protein Crystallization Blog

Congratulations to Ray Stevens and team to determining and publishing the crystallographic structure of the CXCR4 Chemokine receptor in Science. The diffenent binding areas for the small molecule and peptide antagonist are nicely resolved and show extensive interactions with binding pocket residues in the 2.5 – 3.1 A crystal structures.... Read more »

Wu B, Chien EY, Mol CD, Fenalti G, Liu W, Katritch V, Abagyan R, Brooun A, Wells P, Bi FC.... (2010) Structures of the CXCR4 chemokine GPCR with small-molecule and cyclic peptide antagonists. Science (New York, N.Y.), 330(6007), 1066-71. PMID: 20929726  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,082 views

HIV vaccine research heading towards success,so near but so far, latest research and development towards developing HIV vaccine

by B V Waghmare in HIV virus and antiretroviral drugs and antiAIDS vaccine research and developmets

There are few cases observed where some people are tested HIV positive long ago but have not developed AIDS symptoms or the AIDS disease in their entire life and are called by researchers for finding out what is the key difference in them and the other peoples which is imparting capability for not developing HIV infection in to disease AIDS in such individuals.

Researchers have observed that there is a key difference in the genetic constitution of such peoples and they are termed as controlle........ Read more »

B V Waghmare. (2010) Information on HIV virus and antiretroviral drugs and antiAIDS vaccine research and developmets . www.bvwaghmare.blogspot.com. info:/DOI/arXiv/bvwaghmare

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,958 views

in indirect support of the hygiene hypothesis

by Ragamuffin in How We Are Hungry

A recent study out of the University of Michigan Medical School suggests that the stomach bacterium Helicobacter pylori protects against inflammation caused by Salmonella in a mouse model of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD).... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,352 views

Darwin's contributions and why this matters for Mexico's conifers

by Claire Williams in Conifer Reproductive Biology

For International Darwin Day, February 12. Darwin's birthday inspired an elegant treatise by UNAM professor Antonio Lazcano, published in Science back in 2005. His article traces the cultural, social and science history roots behind widespread acceptance of Darwin's ideas in Mexico. This careful analysis is worthwhile reading, particularly for those working in the USA.... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,232 views

Chasing Earthquakes

by Tara Tai in Student Voices

A survey on earthquakes and their effects on causing future quakes.... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,549 views

Copyright vs Medicine: If this topic isn’t covered in your newspaper this weekend, get a new newspaper

by Neurobonkers in Neurobonkers

After thirty years of silence, authors of a standard clinical psychiatric bedside test have issued take down orders of new medical research. Doctors who use copies of the bedside test which will have been printed in some of their oldest medical textbooks are liable to be sued for up to $150,000.... Read more »

Newman, J., & Feldman, R. (2011) Copyright and Open Access at the Bedside. New England Journal of Medicine, 365(26), 2447-2449. DOI: 10.1056/NEJMp1110652  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,408 views

Poppies: You’re getting sleepy…very sleepy…

by aewills in A Bouquet From Mendel

An intro to the lovely California poppy, Eschscholzia californica, its useful alkaloids, and molecular approaches to maximize their biosynthetic yield.... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,454 views

How to construct a bogus survey

by Neurobonkers in Neurobonkers

Statistics are often used by newspapers as the basis for a story. People are far more likely to agree with you if you tell them that they are on the side of the majority. This is why bogus statistics are so effective in moralising comment pieces. It’s a lot easier to say, “hey, most people agree with us” than convince someone with facts. By bogus, I don’t mean data fabrication (though that happens too), I mean rigging the questions to get the answers you want. Here&rsquo........ Read more »

Tajfel, H., . (1986) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_identity. Psychology of intergroup relations , 7-24. info:/

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,077 views

How to spot exo-Earths...

by Invader Xan in Supernova Condensate

It seems like we’re not going to stop discovering new exoplanets anytime soon. Around one sixth of all exoplanets currently known can be observed transiting their star’s disk. Given that transits are precisely what NASA’s Kepler mission is going to spend the next three years looking for, that number is certainly set to increase over the coming months. But with exoplanet transits comes a unique opportunity to study them…... Read more »

Pallé, E., Osorio, M., Barrena, R., Montañés-Rodríguez, P., & Martín, E. (2009) Earth’s transmission spectrum from lunar eclipse observations. Nature, 459(7248), 814-816. DOI: 10.1038/nature08050  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,560 views

Methylome Data in Lethal Prostate Cancer Supports Personalized Medicine

by Nicole Kelesoglu in E3 Engaging Epigenetics Experts

Recent surprising evidence has shown that metastatic tumors usually do not vary in their genomes within an individual. Yet, these tumors behave differently at different sites around the body. Does that mean that epigenetic profiling will be too variable to target for cancer treatment? In a word, no.... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,555 views

Ibrutinib leads the race to CLL 17p deletion market

by Pieter Droppert in Biotech Strategy Blog

Earlier this month, Janssen/Pharmacyclics announced they had submitted a New Drug Application (NDA) for FDA approval of ibrutinib, an oral Bruton’s tyrosine kinase inhibitor (BTK) in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) for the treatment of patients with a deletion of the short arm of chromosome 17 (del17p).

The company have requested Priority review; approval later this year or in early 2014 is highly likely given that the agent also has Breakthrough designation status.

This is grea........ Read more »

Hartmut Döhner, M.D., Stephan Stilgenbauer, M.D., Axel Benner, M.Sc., Elke Leupolt, M.D., Alexander Kröber, M.D., Lars Bullinger, M.D., Konstanze Döhner, M.D., Martin Bentz, M.D., & Peter Lichter, Ph.D. (2000) Genomic Aberrations and Survival in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia. The New England Journal of Medicine, 1910-1916. info:/10.1056/NEJM200012283432602

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,220 views

IS THIS A BANANA I SEE BEFORE ME? SEEING COLOURS THAT AREN’T THERE

by A Giffen in Antisense Science

We all know that bananas are yellow, strawberries are red and oranges are…well orange. But what about a black and white banana? Or a grayscale green bean? Well it turns out our brain still processes these images in the colour we think they should be in.Banana

In a study carried out earlier this year, neuroscientists showed there was a link between our memories, our knowledge of object colour and the way neuronal networks in the brain perceive the object when presented in black and whit........ Read more »

Bannert MM, & Bartels A. (2013) Decoding the Yellow of a Gray Banana. Current biology : CB. PMID: 24184103  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,282 views

Supercomputers, The Human Brain and the Advent of Computational Biology

by JB Sheppard in Antisense Science

Recent developments in computational neuroscience and the modelling of biological systems prompted a look at how advanced our simulations of living systems are today. ... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,540 views

Heroin’s Anthrax Problem

by Rebecca Kreston in BODY HORRORS

Anthrax is a deadly disease with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Because it is, thankfully, also quite rare, it is relatively easy to track its whereabouts and going-ons when an outbreak occurs. Typically, outbreaks of anthrax have been traced to groups of people involved in high-risk activities involving grazing animals and their byproducts: anthrax favors shepherds, butchers, wool-sorters, leather workers, and even the odd drum-playing hippies. In 2009, however, an outbreak upended this........ Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 529 views

FDA officially refers consumers to Wikipedia for information on food pathogens

by Austin Bouck in Animal Science Review

I was perusing the Bad Bug Book while doing some research on the recent Blue Bell outbreak and came across a hyperlink. After hearing “do you want to know more?” in my head I clicked through on some non-L. mono species of Listeria and was…confused. I quickly doubled back, thinking that maybe I had been redirected, but there it was...... Read more »

Food and Drug Administration. (2012) Listeria Monocytogenes. Bad Bug Book, Foodborne pathogenic microorganisms and natural toxins. Second Edition, 99-100. info:/

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,098 views

‘Hotspots’ for DNA breakage in neurons may promote brain genetic diversity, disease

by Tom Ulrich in Vector, a Boston Children's Hospital blog

As organs go, the brain seems to harbor an abundance of somatic mutations — genetic variants that arise after conception and affect only some of our neurons. In one recent study, researchers found about 1,500 variants in each of neurons they sampled.

New research revealing the propensity of DNA to break in certain spots backs up the idea of a genetically diverse brain. Reported in Cell last month, it also suggests a new avenue for thinking about brain development, brain tumors and neuro........ Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,013 views

Recent reports on BHD and skin symptoms – misdiagnosis and new manifestations

by Joana Guedes in BHD Research Blog

Patients with Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD) syndrome usually develop benign hair follicle tumours (BHFTs) which appear as multiple whitish papules developing primarily on the face, neck and torso (Menko et al., 2009). BHFTs such as fibrofolliculomas and trichodiscomas (skin-coloured tumours occurring on the upper body) can be associated with various genetic conditions and their histology is often key to differential diagnosis. The morphology and histology of various BHFTs is discussed in a recent ........ Read more »

Del Rosso JQ, Silverberg N, & Zeichner JA. (2016) When Acne is Not Acne. Dermatologic clinics, 34(2), 225-8. PMID: 27015783  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 928 views

PD-L1 expression associates with non-inactivated VHL ccRCC

by Joana Guedes in BHD Research Blog

The loss of the of the tumor suppressor gene VHL and the subsequent deregulation of VHL/HIF/VEGF signalling are known to play a role in development of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). Renal tumours associated with BHD syndrome are histologically diverse and include a percentage of ccRCC (Pavlovich et al., 2002). Anti-angiogenic therapies targeting the VHL/HIF/VEGF pathway have emerged in past years (Rini et al., 2006) but the development of resistance to these therapeutic agents is leadi........ Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 12 views

DHM attenuates obesity-induced slow-twitch-fiber decrease via FLCN/FNIP1/AMPK pathway

by Joana Guedes in BHD Research Blog

Obesity is often associated with decreases in the proportion of skeletal muscle slow-twitch fibers and insulin sensitivity. Slow-twitch fibers are rich in mitochondria and utilize fatty acid oxidative phosphorylation for energy production. In their new study, Zhou et al. (2017) explore the role of the FLCN/FNIP1/AMPK signalling pathway in obesity-induced reductions in slow-twitch fibers and insulin sensitivity in skeletal muscle using high-fat-diet-induced (HFD) obese mice, ob/ob mutant mice, an........ Read more »

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