Post List

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,456 views

Female snails in Australia are just happy to see you

by Miriam Goldstein in Deep Sea News

In which a distraught marine snail seeks advice about a penis sprouting from the right side of her head.... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,814 views

Rethinking Circadian Clock Machinery

by Allison in Dormivigilia

Chronobiologists at Cambridge have discovered circadian rhythms in peroxide oxidation in HUMAN blood cells. That sounds cool, right? But what if I told you that this research will forever make us rethink the innerworkings of the circadian clock because this is the first documentation of non-transcriptionally driven circadian rhythms... Read more »

O'Neill JS, & Reddy AB. (2011) Circadian clocks in human red blood cells. Nature, 469(7331), 498-503. PMID: 21270888  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,432 views

Only Science Can Save Us, but Science Alone Can’t Save Us

by Paul Statt in Paul Statt Communications

Chris Mooney, writing about the recently un-raptured believers, climate change skeptics, and Moms who refuse to vaccinate, in Mother Jones (“Rapture Ready: The Science of Self Delusion,” May/June 2011) comes to the melancholy conclusion that science has proven that science seldom changes anyone’s mind.... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,973 views

Minding As and P: Can Arsenic Substitute for Phosphorus or Not?

by Sara Klink in Promega Connections

Back in December 2010, there was a press conference held by NASA to announce the discovery of a bacterium found in a high salt, high pH lake with high concentrations of arsenic that seemed to have substituted arsenic for phosphorus in the bacterium’s biomolecules. This set off a wave of response in the blogosphere regarding what Felisa Wolfe-Simon and her team did nor did not do to confirm arsenic was incorporated into DNA molecules. Controversy ranged from the ability of arsenic to form a sta........ Read more »

Wolfe-Simon, F., Blum, J., Kulp, T., Gordon, G., Hoeft, S., Pett-Ridge, J., Stolz, J., Webb, S., Weber, P., Davies, P.... (2011) Response to Comments on "A Bacterium That Can Grow Using Arsenic Instead of Phosphorus". Science. DOI: 10.1126/science.1202098  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,644 views

STSE Education Research

by Jack Hassard in The Art of Teaching Science

Review of research on Science, Technology, Society, Environmental Education research... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,689 views

Simpler LCP-based crystallization

by Peter Nollert in Protein Crystallization Blog

For all those that are interested in simplifying membrane protein crystallization trials, you may want to check out this paper on the topic of 'simplifying LCP-based crystallization':

Wallace E, Dranow D, Laible PD, Christensen J, & Nollert P (2011). Monoolein lipid phases as incorporation and enrichment materials for membrane protein crystallization. PloS one, 6 (8) PMID: 21909395... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,792 views

Communication as a network problem

by Becky in It Takes 30

I recently gave a short talk to a group of post-docs who had organized their own mini-symposium and workshop as a way of bringing the Harvard post-doc community in systems biology together. Those of you who haven’t worked in the Boston area may be surprised that we need special events to bring together a community that is separated by only ~4 miles, but in fact the trip from Harvard’s main campus in Cambridge to Harvard Medical School in Boston is a frustrating and lengthy one. Mu........ Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,227 views

Why speeding neutrinos are interesting for social scientists

by Rense Nieuwenhuis in Curving Normality

In the world as we understand it, based on Einstein, nothing can go faster than light. This prediction based on the general theory of relativity has proven itself countless times in empirical research. And now, lo and behold, a group at CERN has observed neutrino’s racing through earth from France/Switzerland to Italy at the World-record breaking speed of slightly above light-speed!... Read more »

The OPERA Collaboraton: T. Adam, N. Agafonova, A. Aleksandrov, O. Altinok, P. Alvarez Sanchez, A. Anokhina, S. Aoki, A. Ariga, T. Ariga, D. Autiero.... (2011) Measurement of the neutrino velocity with the OPERA detector in the CNGS beam. Arxiv. arXiv: 1109.4897v2

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,738 views

Bioplastics in Bloom

by Whitney Campbell in Green Screen

When imagining the world without a dependence on petroleum, I tend to think of objects like solar panels, electric cars, and wind turbines — the things that could potentially replace the parts of the current oil-energy infrastructure. But what about the other items made from petroleum that could be replaced by alternative materials? What about bicycle tires, nail polishes, compact discs, surf boards, lipsticks, tool boxes, and shower curtains?... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,699 views

Coffee: a caffeinated chronicle

by Jordan Gaines in Gaines, on Brains

Because I like to understand what I'm putting in my body, I decided to explore coffee: its history, its neurological mechanism, and—what I'm sure everyone's dying to know—why it is so easy to become addicted and dependent on it.... Read more »

Cocker PJ, Hosking JG, Benoit J, & Winstanley CA. (2012) Sensitivity to Cognitive Effort Mediates Psychostimulant Effects on a Novel Rodent Cost/Benefit Decision-Making Task. Neuropsychopharmacology : official publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology. PMID: 22453140  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,311 views

Mapping future climate space

by brettcherry in Institute of Hazard, Risk and Resilience Blog

By mapping climate suitability for plant species researchers are able to understand how climate change can affect biodiversity or determine suitable climates in the future for different plants. ... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,738 views

Your Good Side Is the Left Side, According to Science

by United Academics in United Academics

Don’t give it any more thought: according to scientists, left side of the face usually looks better, mainly because it’s more expressive than the right side. Researchers at the Wake Forest University showed a series of photographs to 37 people, some of them mirror-reversed, so the viewers wouldn’t know which side they were looking at. In most cases, they chose the left side no matter where it was in the picture.... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,864 views

More on the viruses inside us: retrotransposons

by EE Giorgi in CHIMERAS

Retrotransposons... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,221 views

Psilocybin and personality

by Scott McGreal in Eye on Psych

Recent psilocybin research has found that not only does personality influence response to the drug, but that the drug can produce long-term changes in features of personality relating to openness to experience. The relationship between personality and psilocybin seems to be two-way. Future research may illuminate the shared basis of mystical-type experiences and related features of personality.... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,950 views

3 surprising insights on how food cravings relate to other desires in everyday life

by Ellen van Kleef in Food Intake Control

What is harder to resist? Checking your Twitter or Facebook account at work or eating a delicious, but fattening snack when you try to watch your calories? Both are inner conflicts, best described as 'I really want to do this, but I should not'.

This blog post looks at the paper of Wilhelm Hofmann, Kathlees Vohs and Roy Baummeister who recently tried to answer these questions in their Everyday Temptation Study. ... Read more »

Hofmann W, Baumeister RF, Förster G, & Vohs KD. (2012) Everyday temptations: an experience sampling study of desire, conflict, and self-control. Journal of personality and social psychology, 102(6), 1318-35. PMID: 22149456  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,918 views

Fructose: friend or foe? Preliminary findings.

by Kismet in Biogerontology and Health

This discussion has been going on for quite some time and it is certainly not limited to the lay press and lay population. I have always been interested in double checking pop-sci claims, in this case the "evil fructose" meme.... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,237 views

IS THIS A BANANA I SEE BEFORE ME? SEEING COLOURS THAT AREN’T THERE

by A Giffen in Antisense Science

We all know that bananas are yellow, strawberries are red and oranges are…well orange. But what about a black and white banana? Or a grayscale green bean? Well it turns out our brain still processes these images in the colour we think they should be in.Banana

In a study carried out earlier this year, neuroscientists showed there was a link between our memories, our knowledge of object colour and the way neuronal networks in the brain perceive the object when presented in black and whit........ Read more »

Bannert MM, & Bartels A. (2013) Decoding the Yellow of a Gray Banana. Current biology : CB. PMID: 24184103  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,305 views

Supercomputers, The Human Brain and the Advent of Computational Biology

by JB Sheppard in Antisense Science

Recent developments in computational neuroscience and the modelling of biological systems prompted a look at how advanced our simulations of living systems are today. ... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,051 views

Lost in Transportation

by Paco Jariego in Mind the Post

Cities are getting more complex. As they grow, their transportation systems become increasingly large and multimodal. Could those human-constructed environments exceed our cognitive capacity?... Read more »

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