Post List

  • February 21, 2011
  • 01:04 PM
  • 1,809 views

Illuminating The Functional Architecture Of The Broken Brain

by Robert Deyes in Promega Connections

The term ‘phrenology’ conjures up images of nineteenth century medics examining bumps on people’s heads as a means of enciphering key aspects of their character (1).  The arch-phrenologist was a man by the name of Franz Josef Gall whose suggestion that “mental faculties might be reflected in the shape of the brain, and hence the [...]... Read more »

Ciocchi S, Herry C, Grenier F, Wolff SB, Letzkus JJ, Vlachos I, Ehrlich I, Sprengel R, Deisseroth K, Stadler MB.... (2010) Encoding of conditioned fear in central amygdala inhibitory circuits. Nature, 468(7321), 277-82. PMID: 21068837  

Haubensak W, Kunwar PS, Cai H, Ciocchi S, Wall NR, Ponnusamy R, Biag J, Dong HW, Deisseroth K, Callaway EM.... (2010) Genetic dissection of an amygdala microcircuit that gates conditioned fear. Nature, 468(7321), 270-6. PMID: 21068836  

  • February 21, 2011
  • 12:53 PM
  • 1,830 views

Measuring the Cupertino Effect in the amygdale and cingulated cortex

by Bradley Voytek in Oscillatory Thoughts

The "Cupertino effect" is the bane of anyone who's used a digital word processor, iPhone, whatever.Let me explain myself.Imaging you're sending a text to your beautiful pregnant wife to let her know you'll be heading home soon. However, automatic text replacement ("autocorrect") fails you horribly:While the appearance of this phenomenon in texting is relatively new, this problem has been around for quite a while. According to the Oxford University Press:Some older spellcheckers had wordlists con........ Read more »

Graff-Guerrero, A., Pellicer, F., Mendoza-Espinosa, Y., Martínez-Medina, P., Romero-Romo, J., & de la Fuente-Sandoval, C. (2008) Cerebral blood flow changes associated with experimental pain stimulation in patients with major depression. Journal of Affective Disorders, 107(1-3), 161-168. DOI: 10.1016/j.jad.2007.08.021  

  • February 21, 2011
  • 12:29 PM
  • 1,409 views

Sweeping Out Selective Sweeps

by Rob Mitchum in ScienceLife

The ultimate genetic detective story is solving the mystery of human evolution. Since it became possible to look at genetic sequences in humans and their primate relatives, geneticists have hunted for the footprints of how humans evolved. But finding the most significant places in the genome that changed since humans and chimpanzees split off from [...]... Read more »

Hernandez RD, Kelley JL, Elyashiv E, Melton SC, Auton A, McVean G, 1000 Genomes Project, Sella G, & Przeworski M. (2011) Classic Selective Sweeps Were Rare in Recent Human Evolution. Science (New York, N.Y.), 331(6019), 920-924. PMID: 21330547  

  • February 21, 2011
  • 12:00 PM
  • 2,605 views

Candida's Unstable Chromosomes & Unorthodox Sex

by Dean Dawson in Small Things Considered

Who hasn't heard of Candida? It’s one of the most common fungal pathogens of humans. It is also a commensal organism, living mainly in people’s gastrointestinal tract. The diseases it causes range from a fairly mild vaginitis to deadly opportunistic systemic infections. In fact, Candida species are a major cause of nosocomial bloodstream infections. Candidas are close relatives of the baker’s yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but live by very different rules.

Candida has been the focus o........ Read more »

Poláková S, Blume C, Zárate JA, Mentel M, Jørck-Ramberg D, Stenderup J, & Piskur J. (2009) Formation of new chromosomes as a virulence mechanism in yeast Candida glabrata. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 106(8), 2688-93. PMID: 19204294  

  • February 21, 2011
  • 11:47 AM
  • 2,151 views

Century-old museum specimens reveal when deadly bird disease hit Galápagos Islands

by GrrlScientist in GrrlScientist

Hypothesis: old specimens in museum collections are invaluable sources of material for molecular forensics research, providing glimpses into the history and ecology of diseases in wildlife ... Read more »

Parker, P., Buckles, E., Farrington, H., Petren, K., Whiteman, N., Ricklefs, R., Bollmer, J., & Jiménez-Uzcátegui, G. (2011) 110 Years of Avipoxvirus in the Gal. PLoS ONE, 6(1). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0015989  

  • February 21, 2011
  • 11:30 AM
  • 1,827 views

If we can put a man on the moon, why can't we cure cancer?

by Orac in Respectful Insolence

Why haven't we cured cancer yet?

If we can put a man on the moon, why can't we cure cancer?

If we can harness the atom, why can't we cure cancer?

How many times have you heard these questions, or variants thereof? How many times have you asked this question yourself? Sometimes, I even ask this question myself. Saturday was the two year anniversary of the death of my mother-in-law from a particularly nasty form of breast cancer, and, even though I am a breast cancer surgeon, I still wonder why........ Read more »

Berger, M., Lawrence, M., Demichelis, F., Drier, Y., Cibulskis, K., Sivachenko, A., Sboner, A., Esgueva, R., Pflueger, D., Sougnez, C.... (2011) The genomic complexity of primary human prostate cancer. Nature, 470(7333), 214-220. DOI: 10.1038/nature09744  

  • February 21, 2011
  • 11:09 AM
  • 1,527 views

Century-old museum specimens reveal when deadly bird disease came to Galápagos Islands

by GrrlScientist in Maniraptora

Hypothesis: old specimens in museum collections are invaluable sources of material for molecular forensics research, providing glimpses into the history and ecology of diseases in wildlife ... Read more »

Parker, P., Buckles, E., Farrington, H., Petren, K., Whiteman, N., Ricklefs, R., Bollmer, J., & Jiménez-Uzcátegui, G. (2011) 110 Years of Avipoxvirus in the Gal. PLoS ONE, 6(1). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0015989  

  • February 21, 2011
  • 10:27 AM
  • 1,288 views

On oncogenes in Luminal B breast cancer

by Sally Church in Pharma Strategy Blog

ZNF703 is the first oncogene to be discovered in five years and appears to be active in Luminal B breast cancer, which is common in ER+ disease. Continue reading →
... Read more »

  • February 21, 2011
  • 10:19 AM
  • 1,168 views

Never knowingly understated

by Richard Grant in Faculty of 1000

It’s no big secret that we’re not fans of the journal impact factor. So it’s possibly justified to feel a little smug that overstating conclusions of research is positively correlated with impact factor. F1000 Member Noam Ziv evaluates a paper … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • February 21, 2011
  • 10:19 AM
  • 821 views

Never knowingly understated

by Richard Grant in Naturally Selected

It’s no big secret that we’re not fans of the journal impact factor. So it’s possibly justified to feel a little smug that overstating conclusions of research is positively correlated with impact factor. F1000 Member Noam Ziv evaluates a paper … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • February 21, 2011
  • 10:16 AM
  • 1,218 views

Pay Close Attention to the Big Mouths in Voir Dire

by Persuasion Strategies in Persuasive Litigator

By: Dr. Ken Broda-Bahm - So your case is in, your jury is ready to start deliberating, and you feel pretty confident that at least the majority of your jurors favor your side of the case. Should you feel safe? Of course not, because the verdict isn't in the hands of the majority as much as it is in the mouths of those with the loudest and most persistent voices. When conducting mock trials, we see it over and over again: The individual verdict preferences we measured before the start of delibera........ Read more »

  • February 21, 2011
  • 09:55 AM
  • 1,186 views

Booster breaks at work enhance health and energy, and could ripple through organisations

by Alex Fradera in BPS Occupational Digest

Many of us in developed countries know that our lifestyle gets in the way of achieving a level of health in line with our level of wealth. With around half our waking hours spent in work settings, Wendell C. Taylor recommends an evidence-based workplace policy aimed to boost our health, with follow-on benefits for the organisation. Taylor's paper, an eclectic review of research and practises including US federal recommendations, yogic techniques and sports science, points out that the modern wo........ Read more »

  • February 21, 2011
  • 09:19 AM
  • 1,338 views

Are Overly-Sexual Men Really Depressed?

by Ultimo167 in Strong Silent Types

A commentary by Ogrodniczuk and Oliffe (2011) on the disputed topic of men and depression. Do men really mask their blues behind a curtain of violence and if so, what does this say about the credibility of depression as a stand-alone disease state? Gender role socialisation always seems like such a good friend when meandering through such contentious matters, until you think beyond the obvious to wonder, hang on, how can it be that when men get depressed they invariably turn to the biff?... Read more »

Ogrodniczuk, J., & Oliffe, J. (2011) Men and Depression. Canadian Family Physician, 57(2), 153-155. info:/

  • February 21, 2011
  • 09:05 AM
  • 1,101 views

Scientific American guest blog: Ecological opportunity is all around us

by Jeremy Yoder in Denim and Tweed

The latest entry in the wide-ranging Guest Blog at Scientific American is a post by yours truly, about a subject I've discussed before:Since the Origin was first published, biologists have come to use the phrase ecological opportunity to describe the processes that can produce a diverse group of species from a single colonizing ancestor. Islands provide colonizing species with new food resources and an escape from predators and competitors. Under these highly favorable conditions, island species........ Read more »

Yoder, J.B., S. Des Roches, J.M. Eastman, L. Gentry, W.K.W. Godsoe, T. Hagey, D. Jochimsen, B.P. Oswald, J. Robertson, B.A.J. Sarver.... (2010) Ecological opportunity and the origin of adaptive radiations. Journal of Evolutionary Biology, 1581-96. DOI: 10.1111/j.1420-9101.2010.02029.x  

  • February 21, 2011
  • 08:00 AM
  • 2,213 views

How Controversial is Weight Management in The Elderly?

by Arya M. Sharma in Dr. Sharma's Obesity Notes

With the strong public focus on preventing and managing childhood obesity, it seems that we often forget that the population burden of obesity is actually in adults, including a substantial proportion of the elderly.
But whether or not obesity should be treated in the elderly is less clear.
It is therefore perhaps notable that TS Han and [...]... Read more »

Han TS, Tajar A, & Lean ME. (2011) Obesity and weight management in the elderly. British medical bulletin. PMID: 21325341  

  • February 21, 2011
  • 08:00 AM
  • 865 views

We haven’t seen this in a mammal! Rewrite the textbooks!

by Zen Faulkes in NeuroDojo

Textbooks have a lot to answer for.

Textbooks are not the compilation of all knowledge in a field. They are simplified summaries created to teach students new to a field the general lay of the land.

People forget this. Cranks get obsessed with advancing their pet theories by attacking “textbook examples,” because they think the textbook example is all the evidence we have. “If I can show there’s something wrong with the peppered moth example of natural selection, I’ll prove evolution........ Read more »

  • February 21, 2011
  • 07:07 AM
  • 1,513 views

Igor Suslov and the beta function of the scalar field

by Marco Frasca in The Gauge Connection

I think that blogs are a very good vehicle for a scientist to let his/her work widely known and can be really helpful also for colleagues doing research in the same field. This is the case of Igor Suslov at Kapitza Institute in Moscow. Igor is doing groundbreaking research in quantum field theory and, particularly, [...]... Read more »

I. M. Suslov. (2011) Renormalization Group Functions of \phi^4 Theory from High-Temperature Expansions. J.Exp.Theor.Phys., v.112, p.274 (2011); Zh.Eksp.Teor.Fiz., v.139, p.319 (2011). arXiv: 1102.3906v1

  • February 21, 2011
  • 07:02 AM
  • 1,164 views

Wearing your religion on your face

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

We’ve talked before about mock jurors believing they can ‘see’ who is lying, using drugs, or other negative behaviors litigants (or anyone else!) would want to keep private. Now we have new evidence that some of those jurors may have good radar—at least when it comes to being able to identify certain religious group members! [...]


Related posts:Does ‘death qualification’ systematically bias our juries?
In the face of the unexpected: Be cool
“Reactions vary along traditional p........ Read more »

  • February 21, 2011
  • 07:00 AM
  • 1,619 views

February 21, 2011

by Erin Campbell in HighMag Blog

Cell migration is a complicated process, and the ease of genetic manipulation in the fruit fly Drosophila makes it an ideal organism for investigating the genes involved. Add some great live imaging to the mix, and you are a big step closer to understanding cell migration. Border cells are a cluster of migratory cells in the fly egg chamber that are required for proper fertilization of the egg and early patterning of the embryo. This group of 6-10 cells collectively moves to one end of the egg........ Read more »

Poukkula, M., Cliffe, A., Changede, R., & Rorth, P. (2011) Cell behaviors regulated by guidance cues in collective migration of border cells. originally published in The Journal of Cell Biology, 192(3), 513-524. DOI: 10.1083/jcb.201010003  

  • February 21, 2011
  • 06:30 AM
  • 1,218 views

The food bowl is ‘half empty’ for anxious dogs

by Jennifer Appleton in Elements Science

Dogs that suffer from anxiety when left by their owners may have a more pessimistic outlook, reports Jen Appleton.... Read more »

Mendl, M., Brooks, J., Basse, C., Burman, O., Paul, E., Blackwell, E., & Casey, R. (2010) Dogs showing separation-related behaviour exhibit a ‘pessimistic’ cognitive bias. Current Biology, 20(19). DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2010.08.030  

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