Post List

  • September 28, 2010
  • 07:28 PM
  • 620 views

Bad HABit

by Journal Watch Online in Journal Watch Online

Arrive a month later, and they might have missed it. In late 2008, marine biologists were able to witness first-hand the devastating impact of a massive algal bloom on coral reefs in the Gulf of Oman. The episode may be a picture of things to come, as researchers predict that harmful algal blooms (HABs) will […] Read More »... Read more »

  • September 28, 2010
  • 07:05 PM
  • 1,191 views

Cell culture: Oktoberfest

by Rogue in Into Oblivion

On September 18, the 200th edition of Oktoberfest was kicked off in Munich, Germany. Roasted chicken, weisswurst and tasty bretzels are all around, and of course, the beer! In this edition of Cell Culture, the whole beer journey is presented: from the foamy Mass to tourist’s liver. Michaeleen Doucleff writes a must-read report about it. [...]... Read more »

Doucleff M. (2010) Cell culture: Oktoberfest. Cell. info:/10.1016/j.cell.2010.09.007

  • September 28, 2010
  • 06:38 PM
  • 1,099 views

A Filter for Finding “All Studies on Animal Experimentation in PubMed”

by Laika in Laika's Medliblog

For  an introduction to search filters you can first read this post. Most people searching PubMed try to get rid of publications about animals. But basic scientists and lab animal technicians just want to find those animal studies. PubMed has built-in filters for that: the limits. There is a limit  for “humans” and a limit for “animals”. [...]... Read more »

  • September 28, 2010
  • 06:09 PM
  • 505 views

Citing in 140 characters

by Hadas Shema in Information Culture

Using the Israeli SF&F society's time machine* I managed to get an a advanced copy of Priem and Costello's paper: "How and why scholars cite on Twitter", which will be presented at the ASIST 2010 conference (22-27 October). As one can learn from the paper's name, it deals with researchers' Twitter citing behavior. The snowball sampling here is a bit problematic, as the authors themselves admit in the conclusion part. They started with 3 academics from different disciplines, asked them to tw........ Read more »

Priem, J., & Costello K. L. (2010) How and why scholars cite on Twitter. ASIST, Oct. 22-27, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. info:/

  • September 28, 2010
  • 06:01 PM
  • 1,109 views

Risky decisions – just do it, or not?

by Jan Husdal in husdal.com

Choosing the right supplier is a risky decision. Chose the wrong supplier, and you may face a severe disruption in your supply chain. Chose the right supplier, and all goes well. Hopefully. But is it possible to judge risk objectively? [ ... ]... Read more »

  • September 28, 2010
  • 05:45 PM
  • 397 views

Psycasm - Dark Ideas of Different Colours

by Rift in Psycasm



[Wherein our hero stumbles upon the worlds very first Synesthete, and quiety wishes that he too had super powers...]
This is not the kind of post I normally make, but in doing some research for another subject I came across something that's quite fascinating.
But first, a preamble.
Every first year Psych students becomes familiar with a number of case studies. The most famous is probabl; (read more)

Source: Rift - Discipline: Psychology... Read more »

  • September 28, 2010
  • 05:45 PM
  • 817 views

Featured - Dark Ideas of Different Colours

by Rift in Psycasm



[Wherein our hero stumbles upon the worlds very first Synesthete, and quiety wishes that he too had super powers...]
This is not the kind of post I normally make, but in doing some research for another subject I came across something that's quite fascinating.
But first, a preamble.
Every first year Psych students becomes familiar with a number of case studies. The most famous is probabl; (read more)

Source: Rift - Discipline: Psychology... Read more »

  • September 28, 2010
  • 05:37 PM
  • 1,063 views

K: Japan's Next-Generation Supercomputer

by Olexandr Isayev in olexandrisayev.com

Fujitsu announced that today it began shipping the computing units for Japan's Next-Generation Supercomputer, nicknamed the "K" computer.... Read more »

  • September 28, 2010
  • 05:37 PM
  • 816 views

K: Japan’s Next-Generation Supercomputer

by Olexandr Isayev in olexandrisayev.com

Fujitsu announced that today it began shipping the computing units for Japan's Next-Generation Supercomputer, nicknamed the "K" computer.... Read more »

  • September 28, 2010
  • 05:30 PM
  • 414 views

Minimally-Invasive Laser Surgery

by Michael Long in Phased

Dwayne Miller (University of Toronto, Canada) and coworkers have developed a picosecond infrared laser scalpel that reduces the scarring and adjacent tissue damage seen after conventional surgical incisions. This news feature was written on September 28, 2010.... Read more »

  • September 28, 2010
  • 04:29 PM
  • 550 views

Unexpected findings on medical imaging are usually harmless

by Helen Jaques in In Sickness and In Health

Imagine you go for an MRI or an x ray and the radiologist spots something they didn’t anticipate on your scan – you would be worried, right? Well, maybe you don’t need to be. A study of more than 1,400 scan found that almost 40% showed at least one such “incidental finding” but only 2.5% [...]... Read more »

Orme, N., Fletcher, J., Siddiki, H., Harmsen, W., O'Byrne, M., Port, J., Tremaine, W., Pitot, H., McFarland, E., Robinson, M.... (2010) Incidental Findings in Imaging Research: Evaluating Incidence, Benefit, and Burden. Archives of Internal Medicine, 170(17), 1525-1532. DOI: 10.1001/archinternmed.2010.317  

  • September 28, 2010
  • 03:46 PM
  • 435 views

The impairment of memory consolidation in psychiatric patients

by 神経オタク in Cognitive Convolutions

Genzel L, Ali E, Dresler M, Steiger A, & Tesfaye M (2010). Sleep-dependent memory consolidation of a new task is inhibited in psychiatric patients. Journal of psychiatric research PMID: 20869069Just a little update, since I've been slacking lately.The authors looked at schizophrenic and depressive Ethiopian patients given a sequential finger tapping task (a motor task used often in sleep research... Read more »

  • September 28, 2010
  • 03:30 PM
  • 691 views

Serotonin Modulates Prosocial Behavior via Harm Aversion

by Michael Long in Phased

Molly Crockett (University of Cambridge, United Kingdom) and coworkers present evidence that supports the harm aversion hypothesis, rather than the emotional regulation hypothesis, of serotonin's modulation of prosocial behavior. This news feature was written on September 28, 2010.... Read more »

  • September 28, 2010
  • 02:54 PM
  • 1,035 views

HEAVY METAL SHIELDS FLOWERS FROM DISEASE

by Casey Rentz in Natural Selections


Look out! This little white flower can protect itself...in a major way. Alpine pennycress, a dandelion-looking plant found growing in the dirt next to former mines can absorb metal and use it to shield itself from disease, says a recent study in PLoS Pathogens. Why are we always so surprised to witness a seemingly primitive plant or animal adapting to things in post-industrial human societies? It's their world, too.
Anyway, back to the story--Zinc, nickel, or cadmium, if sucked up in high enoug........ Read more »

Fones H, Davis CA, Rico A, Fang F, Smith JA, & Preston GM. (2010) Metal hyperaccumulation armors plants against disease. PLoS pathogens, 6(9). PMID: 20838462  

  • September 28, 2010
  • 02:18 PM
  • 763 views

Science or sciencey [part 1]

by Daniel Simons in The Invisible Gorilla

The first of a 4-part series examining what happens when science is used for marketing (using brain-training software as the central example). ... Read more »

  • September 28, 2010
  • 01:23 PM
  • 1,422 views

What Happens When A White Dwarf Collides With A Neutron Star?

by Joseph Smidt in The Eternal Universe

                             Image via WikipediaPaschalidis et al. recently simulated what will happen when a white dwarf collides with a neutron star in a head on collision incorporating the effects of general relativity.

In each case I will list the mass of the white dwarf and neutron star in solar masses, (meaning the mass of these objects after dividing my the mass of the sun) the ratio of

... Read more »

Vasileios Paschalidis, Zachariah Etienne, Yuk Tung Liu, & Stuart L. Shapiro. (2010) Head-on collisions of binary white dwarf--neutron stars: Simulations in full general relativity. Submitted to PRD. arXiv: 1009.4932v1

  • September 28, 2010
  • 12:24 PM
  • 923 views

Giraffes – Necks for food or necks for sex?

by Laelaps in Laelaps

The neck of a giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis) is a marvelous thing. Comprised of only seven vertebrae* – no more than in your neck – the towering feat of natural engineering is at once stunning and ridiculous. How could such a structure have evolved? This question is not just a throw-away. For the past century and [...]... Read more »

  • September 28, 2010
  • 10:55 AM
  • 2,015 views

Chemistry of the Great Big Blue: Sewage

by Bluegrass Blue Crab in Southern Fried Science



"Warning! Stormwater discharge area may be contaminated by discharge from pipe. Swimming is not recommended within 200 feet of this sign during active discharge"
You live on a rural island. You poop. You flush. Does your island have a sewage treatment plant? Is your plant large enough to deal with the influx of tourists that increases [...]... Read more »

  • September 28, 2010
  • 10:30 AM
  • 489 views

Dali on the Brain: Voltaire and the Nuns

by Psychology 379 bloggers in Cognition & the Arts

When daring to venture into the modern art wing of your local museum, you often only superficially browse through the paintings. You pause at each one for maybe eight seconds, describing the work as modern, abstract, or thinking “oh, it’s all so ambiguous and undefined, I feel like an intellectual,” (while pausing to layer a smidgen of cheese over a cracker and audibly swill some wine). However, within the small aperture of time spent ogling a visually-ambiguous and confounding........ Read more »

  • September 28, 2010
  • 10:09 AM
  • 1,959 views

Pivar's pure fantasy published

by Bjørn Østman in Pleiotropy

Bogus paper published in serious journal... Read more »

Pivar, S. (2010) The origin of the vertebrate skeleton. International Journal of Astrobiology, 1-21. DOI: 10.1017/S147355041000025X  

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