Post List

  • March 8, 2017
  • 10:30 AM
  • 214 views

Dearly Departed Dogs

by CAPB in Companion Animal Psychology Blog

Do online pet obituaries reveal how we truly feel about our pets?Guest post by Jane Gething-Lewis (Hartpury College).“You were such a selfless and giving boy. Dad loves you with all his heart.”A heartfelt online tribute to a dearly departed loved one – but this loved one had four legs, a tail and was called Cosmo. Over the top? Not necessarily. Research suggests that many people feel the loss of a beloved pet as keenly as the loss of a child.The bond people have with each other has long be........ Read more »

  • March 8, 2017
  • 08:30 AM
  • 236 views

Epigenetic Predisposition to Radiation Fibrosis

by Christoph Weigel in EpiBeat

Radiotherapy is a highly efficient treatment for many cancers including breast cancer. Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT), a relatively new type of radiation therapy, has proven successful as a curative treatment for early cancer stages. However, in spite of great improvements in dose delivery and imaging technology, unwanted exposure of healthy tissue to radiation cannot be fully avoided. The resulting late-onset toxicity due to the exposure of health tissue currently limits the usefulness of r........ Read more »

Weigel C, Veldwijk MR, Oakes CC, Seibold P, Slynko A, Liesenfeld DB, Rabionet M, Hanke SA, Wenz F, Sperk E.... (2016) Epigenetic regulation of diacylglycerol kinase alpha promotes radiation-induced fibrosis. Nature communications, 10893. PMID: 26964756  

  • March 8, 2017
  • 07:02 AM
  • 229 views

A secret weapon for voir dire: Smart people are more curious

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

Back in October of 2016, we wrote about a paper by the Cultural Cognition Project on assessing “scientific curiosity”. Here is some of what we said then about what Kahan and his colleagues found by measuring scientific curiosity: “What they found was that participants who scored higher on the curiosity scale were more likely to […]... Read more »

  • March 8, 2017
  • 04:30 AM
  • 206 views

Cartilage Degradation After ACL Altered by Early Injection

by Nicole Cattano in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

A corticosteroid injection performed within the first 5 weeks after anterior cruciate ligament injury resulted in significantly less of an increase in cartilage degradation markers in comparison to placebo injections.... Read more »

Lattermann, C., Jacobs, C., Proffitt Bunnell, M., Huston, L., Gammon, L., Johnson, D., Reinke, E., Huebner, J., Kraus, V., & Spindler, K. (2017) A Multicenter Study of Early Anti-inflammatory Treatment in Patients With Acute Anterior Cruciate Ligament Tear. The American Journal of Sports Medicine, 45(2), 325-333. DOI: 10.1177/0363546516666818  

  • March 8, 2017
  • 03:09 AM
  • 223 views

Blocking FRAAs and thyroid function in autism (continued)

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Readers of this post are advised to check out a previous blogging occasion describing how 'FRAAs - folate receptor alpha autoantibodies - may correlate with reduced thyroid function in cases of autism' before heading into this entry on the recent paper published by Richard Frye and colleagues [1].You're back already? OK, well just in case you didn't read that last entry (😉), it's worthwhile first noting that: "Folate receptor α (FRα) autoantibodies (FRAAs) are prevalent in autism spectrum d........ Read more »

  • March 8, 2017
  • 02:16 AM
  • 210 views

See the First Underwater Video of the Ultra-Rare True's Beaked Whale

by beredim in Strange Animals






The group feautred in this videp was formed by three adult or sub-adult whales. Social behavior of the True's Beaked Whale is still unknown but the group seemed to dive in a coordinated manner, as has been observed in other species of beaked whales. Credit: Roland Edler





True's beaked whales (Mesoplodon mirus) are such an elusive species that it's only now that we finally have the ... Read more »

Aguilar de Soto, N., Martín, V., Silva, M., Edler, R., Reyes, C., Carrillo, M., Schiavi, A., Morales, T., García-Ovide, B., Sanchez-Mora, A.... (2017) True’s beaked whale (Mesoplodon mirus) in Macaronesia. PeerJ. DOI: 10.7717/peerj.3059  

  • March 7, 2017
  • 11:01 AM
  • 246 views

Can Older Drivers Benefit From Training?

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

Older drivers are over-represented in motor-vehicle driving accidents.The lowest rate of fatal vehicle crashes per 100 million miles driven is found in drivers between the ages of 30-69 years of age.Fatal vehicle driving rates per miles driven is 4 to 5 times higher in drivers over 80 years of age. (IIHS.org data)So can older drivers be trained or educated to improve their safety (and the safety o those around them)?A recent randomized controlled trial examined an educational intervention in dri........ Read more »

  • March 7, 2017
  • 04:23 AM
  • 257 views

Herbal medicines 'for' ADHD systematically reviewed

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

The paper by Dennis Anheyer and colleagues [1] (open-access available here) is offered up for your reading consumption today, and the results of a review of the available published science - "Only randomized controlled trails (RCT)" (authors' spelling mistake not mine) - looking at the use of herbal medicines for the treatment/management of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).OK I know some people read the term 'herbal medicine' and automatically think 'woo'. If I instead use th........ Read more »

  • March 6, 2017
  • 06:32 AM
  • 233 views

The growing divide between higher and low impact scientific journals

by Richard Kunert in Brain's Idea

Ten years ago the Public Library of Science started one big lower impact and a series of smaller higher impact journals. Over the years these publication outlets diverged. The growing divide between standard and top journals might mirror wider trends in scholarly publishing. There are roughly two kinds of journals in the Public Library of […]... Read more »

Vale, R.D. (2015) Accelerating scientific publication in biology. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 13439-13446. DOI: 10.1101/022368  

  • March 6, 2017
  • 06:19 AM
  • 219 views

Patent for Stimulation of Brodmann Areas 1-48 and all other structures

by The Neurocritic in The Neurocritic





Fig 1 (Roskams-Edriset al., 2017). The number of patents implicating specific brain regions has risen from 1976 to the mid 2010s. Results were obtained by searching The Lens patent database (http://lens.org/).


“What is the ethical value of awarding patent rights that implicate regions of the brain?”

Do the applicants intend to patent the function of specific brain areas? This absurd

... Read more »

Roskams-Edris, D., Anderson-Redick, S., Kiss, Z., & Illes, J. (2017) Situating brain regions among patent rights and moral risks. Nature Biotechnology, 35(2), 119-121. DOI: 10.1038/nbt.3782  

  • March 6, 2017
  • 04:39 AM
  • 192 views

Bumblebees Learn To Score Goals For Food !

by beredim in Strange Animals

New study by researchers at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) shows how bumblebees (Bombus terrestris) can be trained to score goals with a mini-ball, revealing unprecedented learning abilities:



Researchers train bumblebees to move a ball in order to access a sugar solution as a reward.


The study, published in the journal Science, suggests that species whose lifestyle demands advanced ... Read more »

  • March 6, 2017
  • 04:25 AM
  • 258 views

"Logical fallacies in animal model research"

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

A paper which is a bit 'out of left field' is presented for your reading pleasure today and how one should be rather careful about how animal research - "with focus on animal models of mental illness" - is translated into relevance to humans [1].The paper by Espen Sjoberg is pertinent to various diagnostic labels including depression and schizophrenia. I would perhaps disagree with the author including autism under the specific heading of 'mental illness' (bearing in mind various mental hea........ Read more »

Sjoberg EA. (2017) Logical fallacies in animal model research. Behavioral and Brain Functions. info:/10.1186/s12993-017-0121-8

  • March 5, 2017
  • 11:46 PM
  • 221 views

If Collectivists like Social Groups, and Cities are Social Groups, do Collectivists like Cities?

by Mark Rubin in Mark Rubin's Social Psychology Research Blog

Do you like the place where you live? Maybe its got great architecture, its clean and crime free, the housing is cheap, and/or the nightlife is good? But maybe your liking for the place is also related to something else - your own tendency to identify with social groups? In some recent research, my colleagues and I investigated this issue by considering the relations between collectivism, city identification, and city evaluation.Collectivism is a sociocultural orientation towards perceiving the ........ Read more »

  • March 5, 2017
  • 05:37 PM
  • 357 views

Do you crave music like you crave a cookie?

by Kiralee Musgrove in Neuroscientist on music

Imagine there is a cookie sitting in front of you. You are hungry. You have been on a diet for months. If you have to look at one more raw, paleo, gluten free snack you are going to scream.... Read more »

  • March 4, 2017
  • 06:23 PM
  • 177 views

More non-translatable orthotic research

by Craig Payne in Its a Foot Captain, But Not as You Know It

More non-translatable orthotic research... Read more »

  • March 4, 2017
  • 04:43 AM
  • 237 views

Fatigue in adults with a 22q11.2 deletion syndrome

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

The genetic condition called 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) has, on occasion, provided some research fodder for this blog (see here and see here). The reason for its inclusion here has tended to be around the 'overlap' in the presentation of 22q11.2 and autism/autistic features and the importance of appropriate screening as and when an autism diagnosis is received (see here). Remember: receipt of an autism diagnosis is a starting point not the finishing line.Today I'm once again talk........ Read more »

Vergaelen E, Claes S, Kempke S, & Swillen A. (2017) High prevalence of fatigue in adults with a 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. American journal of medical genetics. Part A. PMID: 28190295  

  • March 4, 2017
  • 03:22 AM
  • 209 views

Is changing footstrike pattern beneficial to runners?

by Craig Payne in Running Research Junkie

Is changing footstrike pattern beneficial to runners?... Read more »

  • March 3, 2017
  • 11:05 PM
  • 191 views

All-Atom Molecular Dynamics Simulations

by ragothamanyennamalli in Getting to know Structural Bioinformatics

With increasing computational power (aka GPU) that can be accessed these days, it is no wonder that performing all-atom molecular dynamics simulation for a longer time, with duplicates and/or triplicates, has become easier.... Read more »

  • March 3, 2017
  • 03:48 PM
  • 268 views

Brain Activity At The Moment of Death

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

What happens in the brain when we die?



Canadian researchers Loretta Norton and colleagues of the University of Western Ontario examine this grave question in a new paper: Electroencephalographic Recordings During Withdrawal of Life-Sustaining Therapy Until 30 Minutes After Declaration of Death

Norton et al. examined frontal EEG recordings from four critically ill patients at the point where their life support was withdrawn. Here are some details on the four:



Here's the EEG recor... Read more »

Norton L, Gibson RM, Gofton T, Benson C, Dhanani S, Shemie SD, Hornby L, Ward R, & Young GB. (2017) Electroencephalographic Recordings During Withdrawal of Life-Sustaining Therapy Until 30 Minutes After Declaration of Death. The Canadian Journal of Neurological Sciences, 44(2), 139-145. PMID: 28231862  

  • March 3, 2017
  • 02:18 PM
  • 205 views

In memoriam: Eugene Garfield – 1925-2017

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

The father of Scientometrics died at 91 years old on February 27, 2017 leaving a production of more than 1.000 papers and communications over 60 years of research. … Read More →... Read more »

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