Post List

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,979 views

Friday Weird Science GUEST POST: The distance between your testicles and your anus, 'taint unimportant

by Allie Wilkinson in OH, FOR THE LOVE OF SCIENCE!

A Friday Weird Science guest post on Neurotic Physiology takes a humorous look at anogenital distance and its implication for fertility in adult males.... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,247 views

Science and The Secret: Can beliefs create reality?

by Juli Breines in Psych Your Mind

A popular series argues that positive thoughts attract positive events. What does psychology research have to say?... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,868 views

Why caffeine jacks you up

by DJ in Neuropoly

Recapping a cool study that locates where the receptors underlying the arousing effects of caffeine live in the brain....... Read more »

Lazarus M, Shen HY, Cherasse Y, Qu WM, Huang ZL, Bass CE, Winsky-Sommerer R, Semba K, Fredholm BB, Boison D.... (2011) Arousal Effect of Caffeine Depends on Adenosine A2A Receptors in the Shell of the Nucleus Accumbens. The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience, 31(27), 10067-10075. PMID: 21734299  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,921 views

The Comeback Cove

by Whitney Campbell in Green Screen

Great news for conservation is always exciting, so when I read about a remarkable wildlife rebound in this month's issue of PLoS ONE, I couldn't resist sharing it here. ... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,856 views

2011: The Year in Drugs Deaths and data fraud

by Neurobonkers in Neurobonkers

A look at the biggest drugs news stories of the year and a statistical analysis of drugs deaths this year.... Read more »

Measham,F. Moore, K. Østergaard, J. (2011) Mephedrone, ‘‘Bubble’’ and unidentified white powders: the contested identities of synthetic ‘‘legal highs". DRUGS AND ALCOHOL TODAY, 137-146. info:/

Editorial team. (2010) The EMCDDA annual report 2010: the state of the drugs problem in Europe. The European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction, also published in Euro surveillance :European communicable disease bulletin, 15(46). PMID: 21144426  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,630 views

Is this journal for real?

by Neurobonkers in Neurobonkers

This year 134 suspect new journals have appeared from the abyss, all published by the same clandestine company “Scientific & Academic Publishing, USA“... Read more »

Morrison, Heather. (2012) Scholarly Communication in Crisis. Freedom for scholarship in the internet age. Simon Fraser University School of Communication. info:/

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,172 views

Magnetism versus Materialism: Which quality is more important for star formation?

by Brooke N in Smaller Questions

What happens in an empirical test of the idea of magnetism-driven star formation, as compared to turbulence-driven star formation?... Read more »

Crutcher, R., Hakobian, N., & Troland, T. (2009) TESTING MAGNETIC STAR FORMATION THEORY. The Astrophysical Journal, 692(1), 844-855. DOI: 10.1088/0004-637X/692/1/844  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,851 views

Ohms law rescued (again)

by Rik in NNNS chemistry blog

Ohm's law (current proportional to voltage) was first formulated in 1827 and the discoverer George Ohm would be pleased to know that in 2012 the law still holds even at the smallest possible nanoscale. Weber et al. in their report in Science do not explain how they would expect conductors to behave in another way at this nanoscale but ventured ahead anyway to create a truly tiny electrical wire, run a current through it and measure resistivity. ... Read more »

Weber, B., Mahapatra, S., Ryu, H., Lee, S., Fuhrer, A., Reusch, T., Thompson, D., Lee, W., Klimeck, G., Hollenberg, L.... (2012) Ohm's Law Survives to the Atomic Scale. Science, 335(6064), 64-67. DOI: 10.1126/science.1214319  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,931 views

Parody: How to Synthesise Pseudoephedrine From N-Methylamphetamine

by Neurobonkers in Neurobonkers

Over in the US it has apparently become so difficult to get hold of pseudoephedrine (Sudafed), that one researcher has published a satirical paper explaining how to manufacture it out of crystal meth (PDF). The paper describes how “in the past most stores were able to sell pseudoephedrine”, the US’s most popular decongestant but new laws require only pharmacies, often with restricted opening hours to sell the medicine only to those carrying government issued ID. The paper argue........ Read more »

Hai, O. Hakkenshit, I.B. (2012) A Simple and Convenient Synthesis of Pseudoephedrine From N-Methylamphetamine. Journal of Apocryphal Chemistry. info:/

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,791 views

Where do Martians get their water?

by Brooke N in Smaller Questions

Rover-based research and the results of 3D simulations of the Martian ice table depth, as well as the formation of pure ice lenses.... Read more »

Sizemore, H., Mellon, M., Searls, M., Lemmon, M., Zent, A., Heet, T., Arvidson, R., Blaney, D., & Keller, H. (2010) In situ analysis of ice table depth variations in the vicinity of small rocks at the Phoenix landing site. Journal of Geophysical Research. DOI: 10.1029/2009JE003414  

Sizemore, H. G., Zent, A. P., & Rempel, A. W. (2012) Ice Lens Formation and Unfrozen Water at the Phoenix Landing Site. 43rd Lunar and Planetary Science Conference. DOI: 2012LPI..43.2397S  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,241 views

Red Meat Consumption May Increase Risk of Death

by United Academics in United Academics

A team of researchers from the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston have studied more than 120,000 people over 30 years to find that ‘red meat consumption is associated with an increased risk of total, CVD [Cardiovascular disease], and cancer mortality.’... Read more »

Pan, A., Sun, Q., Bernstein, A., Schulze, M., Manson, J., Stampfer, M., Willett, W., & Hu, F. (2012) Red Meat Consumption and Mortality: Results From 2 Prospective Cohort Studies. Archives of Internal Medicine. DOI: 10.1001/archinternmed.2011.2287  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,186 views

Blood Test to Predict Breast Cancer in Advance

by United Academics in United Academics

Five years from now it may be possible to prevent breast cancer by taking a simple blood test. New research shows that the chances of developing the disease are linked to a molecular modification of the gene ATM, present on white blood cells. In the future, doctors may identify women with this molecular modification to prevent breast cancer occurrence.... Read more »

Brennan, K., Garcia-Closas, M., Orr, N., Fletcher, O., Jones, M., Ashworth, A., Swerdlow, A., Thorne, H., , ., Riboli, E.... (2012) Intragenic ATM Methylation in Peripheral Blood DNA as a Biomarker of Breast Cancer Risk. Cancer Research, 72(9), 2304-2313. DOI: 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-11-3157  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 5,786 views

The Smith Cloud: The biggest thing you've never heard of

by Brooke N in Smaller Questions

The Smith Cloud, a high-velocity neutral hydrogen cloud in the halo of the Milky Way, helps explain how the Galaxy has been able to continue forming stars at its current rate, despite an apparent lack of interstellar gas.... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 2,374 views

The Aging Effects of the Sun Revealed on Trucker’s Face

by United Academics in United Academics

The man on the picture, William McElligott, spent 28 years of his life driving a delivery truck in Chicago. Only the left side of his face was exposed to the sun, with the result that it now looks much older than his right side. His case is a rare reminder of the aging effects of the sun, but also of the need to take precautions when working under certain conditions.... Read more »

Gordon, J., & Brieva, J. (2012) Unilateral Dermatoheliosis. New England Journal of Medicine, 366(16). DOI: 10.1056/NEJMicm1104059  

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,383 views

Making sense of a small worm from big data

by Michael Hsieh in Hsieh Lab Blog

We recently published a gene expression microarray-based paper in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases. As a "reductionist", it was challenging for me to deal with the massive amount of data associated with the paper. ... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,383 views

Methylomes in Lethal Prostate Cancer Support Personalized Medicine

by Nicole Kelesoglu in E3 Engaging Epigenetics Experts

Recent surprising evidence has shown that metastatic tumors usually do not vary in their genomes within an individual. Yet, these tumors behave differently at different sites around the body. Does that mean that epigenetic profiling will be too variable to target for cancer treatment? In a word, no.... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,630 views

a little bit of unpredictable stress everyday

by Mitchell Harden in Mitch's Blog

That is the recipe for depression. Chronic Mild Stress (CMS). Or at least it is the recipe I used to depress rats. As I mentioned earlier I worked with rats to research the mood-effects of Salvia. One important piece of this research was the idea that a depressed brain is different than a healthy brain and may respond differently to drug exposure. So in order to apply that in rats, I needed a way to create depressed rats. For me, that meant using CMS.
... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,658 views

Stress Leaves Its Mark on Dad’s Sperm

by Anouk Vleugels in United Academics

For the first time, researchers have found that stress can leave an epigenetic mark on sperm, which then alters the offspring’s hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, a part of the brain that deals with responding to stress. The study was published in the Journal of Neuroscience.... Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 1,792 views

Rats With (Not Quite) Telepathy

by Sedeer El-Showk in United Academics

Ten years ago, Professor Miguel Nicolelis and his team at Duke University made history. They implanted electrodes — sensors — into a monkey’s brain and trained her to control a robotic arm with her thoughts. That may sound like the stuff of science-fiction, but his latest work is even more incredible. In a paper recently published in Scientific Reports, Professor Nicolelis and his team used similar technology to enable a pair of rats to communicate — one brain to another ........ Read more »

  • November 30, 1999
  • 12:00 AM
  • 802 views

Anatomy of a "Serving"

by Austin Bouck in Animal Science Review

s it how much you’re expected to eat? How much you should eat? Pardon me, but if I want to eat an entire bag of potato chips, that’s exactly what I’m going to do.

I say this as the guy who helps create nutrition facts panels for food products for a living. I have read, reread, proof read, and colored red hundreds of these little tables in my time, and believe it or not, people aren’t lining up at parties to hear my thrilling stories... Read more »

Conrad J. Choinière, & Amy Lando. (2008) 2008 Health and Diet Survey. FDA Consumer Behavior Research Foos Safety Surveys (FSS). info:/

join us!

Do you write about peer-reviewed research in your blog? Use ResearchBlogging.org to make it easy for your readers — and others from around the world — to find your serious posts about academic research.

If you don't have a blog, you can still use our site to learn about fascinating developments in cutting-edge research from around the world.

Register Now

Research Blogging is powered by SMG Technology.

To learn more, visit seedmediagroup.com.