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  • December 7, 2016
  • 01:21 PM
  • 39 views

The Hunt for the Higgs Bison Is Over

by Jeffrey Daniels in United Academics

A recently-published study has now resolved the mystery of the bison bones, with the help of some Ice Age cave artists. It turns out that there once existed, during the Ice Age, a hybrid between the now-extinct aurochs (the beast from which we domesticated the cow) and the equally-extinct steppe bison (basically, the Asian version of the American bison).... Read more »

  • November 23, 2016
  • 05:24 PM
  • 176 views

Interpreting English language ideologies in Korea: dreams vs. realities

by Lg_on_the_move in Language on the Move

Many people around the world dream of learning English. The pursuit of English is rarely only, or even predominantly, about language learning: it’s...... Read more »

  • November 18, 2016
  • 11:00 AM
  • 273 views

Imagine: Listening to Songs Which Make Us More Generous

by Jalees Rehman in The Next Regeneration

It does not come as a surprise that background music in a café helps create the ambience and affects how much customers enjoy sipping their cappuccinos. But recent research suggests that the choice of lyrics can even impact the social behavior of customers. The researcher Nicolas Ruth and his colleagues from the University of Würzburg (Bavaria, Germany) assembled a playlist of 18 songs with pro-social lyrics which they had curated by surveying 74 participants in an online questionnaire as to w........ Read more »

  • November 18, 2016
  • 08:31 AM
  • 234 views

Is anybody out there? Talking to the Galactic Zookeepers

by gdw in FictionalFieldwork

The Zoo Hypothesis Hello? Anybody out there in the starry skies? If there are extra-terrestrial civilizations, why haven’t we heard from them yet? The sheer magnitude of the universe with its billions upon billions of stars has led many to suggest that life must have arisen more than once in the cosmos. Some have gone […]... Read more »

  • November 10, 2016
  • 04:29 AM
  • 194 views

Building bridges in a divided world

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

As I am trying to finalize the manuscript for the second revised edition of my 2011 book Intercultural Communication: A...... Read more »

Markus, A. (2016) Australians Today: The Australia@2015 Scanlon Foundation Survey. Scanlon Foundation. info:/

  • November 3, 2016
  • 11:10 PM
  • 211 views

Stereotyped ethnic names as a barrier to workplace entry

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

Who of the three women in this image do you think German employers are most likely to consider as a...... Read more »

  • October 31, 2016
  • 02:03 AM
  • 200 views

Room 33 Revisited

by teofilo in Gambler's House

In my post about the recent radiocarbon dating of macaw remains from Chaco Canyon, I mentioned another paper I’ve been meaning to post about. Published in 2010 by Steve Plog and Carrie Heitman of the University of Virginia, it takes a close look at burial practices at Chaco, particularly focusing on the northern burial cluster […]... Read more »

Plog, S., & Heitman, C. (2010) Hierarchy and social inequality in the American Southwest, A.D. 800-1200. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 107(46), 19619-19626. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1014985107  

  • October 27, 2016
  • 02:30 AM
  • 208 views

What makes foreigners weird? A quick guide to orientalism

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

One of the central arguments of my book Intercultural Communication is that, even today, much intercultural communication is approached from...... Read more »

Piller, I. (2011) Intercultural Communication: A Critical Introduction. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press. info:/

  • October 22, 2016
  • 03:10 PM
  • 225 views

Red meat and organs may pose a significant health hazard

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Neu5Gc, a non-human sialic acid sugar molecule common in red meat that increases the risk of tumor formation in humans, is also prevalent in pig organs, with concentrations increasing as the organs are cooked, a study has found. The research suggests that Neu5Gc may pose a significant health hazard among those who regularly consume organ meats from pigs.

... Read more »

  • October 10, 2016
  • 07:15 PM
  • 269 views

How States Promote Global English: Shifting Priorities in Education

by Peter Ives in Language on the Move

We are repeatedly told that people around the world are choosing to learn and use English. The media and many...... Read more »

  • October 8, 2016
  • 02:31 PM
  • 279 views

Concentrating on the social billions

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Using online social media does not lead to long-term problems with our ability to concentrate, according to new research. We are social animals, so it is really no surprise that billions of us now use online tools to communicate, educate and inform each other. The advent of social media and social networking has nevertheless been phenomenally rapid.

... Read more »

Doss, S., Carstens, D., & Kies, S. (2016) Episodic social media impact on users. International Journal of Social Media and Interactive Learning Environments, 4(3), 273. DOI: 10.1504/IJSMILE.2016.079505  

  • October 1, 2016
  • 03:20 PM
  • 326 views

Nature or nurture: is violence in our genes?

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Nature or nurture? The quest to understand why humans kill one another has occupied the minds of philosophers, sociologists and psychologists for centuries. Are we innately violent, as Englishman Thomas Hobbes postulated in the 1650s, or is our behaviour influenced more by the environment we grow up in, as Jean-Jacques Rousseau theorised a century later?

... Read more »

Gómez, J., Verdú, M., González-Megías, A., & Méndez, M. (2016) The phylogenetic roots of human lethal violence. Nature. DOI: 10.1038/nature19758  

  • September 29, 2016
  • 11:36 AM
  • 272 views

No Population Continuity Between Pre Toba Eruption And Extant Humans In India

by Suvrat Kher in Rapid Uplift

Stone tools and fossils suggest that an early wave of Homo sapiens may have migrated into India as early as 100K years ago. Did these migrants leave a genetic trace in present day Indians.. ... Read more »

Mallick, S., Li, H., Lipson, M., Mathieson, I., Gymrek, M., Racimo, F., Zhao, M., Chennagiri, N., Nordenfelt, S., Tandon, A.... (2016) The Simons Genome Diversity Project: 300 genomes from 142 diverse populations. Nature. DOI: 10.1038/nature18964  

Groucutt, H., Petraglia, M., Bailey, G., Scerri, E., Parton, A., Clark-Balzan, L., Jennings, R., Lewis, L., Blinkhorn, J., Drake, N.... (2015) Rethinking the dispersal of out of Africa . Evolutionary Anthropology: Issues, News, and Reviews, 24(4), 149-164. DOI: 10.1002/evan.21455  

  • September 29, 2016
  • 01:21 AM
  • 295 views

Urban sociolinguistics in Dubai

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

A couple of years ago, I mused here on Language on the Move what linguistic theory would look like if...... Read more »

Piller, I. (2016) Dubai: Language in the ethnocratic, corporate and mobile city. Smakman, D. and P. Heinrich. Eds. Metrolinguistics: Urban Language Ecologies around the World. info:/

  • September 21, 2016
  • 12:46 AM
  • 319 views

Can ESL teachers play a role in helping maintain the home language?

by Agnes Bodis in Language on the Move








ESL teachers play an important role in home language maintenance (Image Credit: Macquarie University)
Learning the host country’s language is important for migrants but we should not forget that maintaining the home language is just as essential for the next generation’s success in life. Unfortunately, in Australia there are no policies in place that support the home language maintenance of languages other than English. In the absence of top-down approaches, changing........ Read more »

  • September 14, 2016
  • 11:24 PM
  • 353 views

Language and migration

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

Humans are a migratory species. Although in modern society the dominant imagery we have created about ourselves is that it...... Read more »

Piller, I. (2016) Language and migration. Language and migration, 1-20. info:/

  • September 13, 2016
  • 03:48 PM
  • 315 views

Entitlement -- a damning recipe for happiness

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Entitlement--a personality trait driven by exaggerated feelings of deservingness and superiority--may lead to chronic disappointment, unmet expectations and a habitual, self-reinforcing cycle of behavior with dire psychological and social costs, according to new research. In a new theoretical model, researchers have mapped how entitled personality traits may lead to a perpetual loop of distress.

... Read more »

  • September 10, 2016
  • 03:09 PM
  • 358 views

Social connectedness can increase suicide risk

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Community characteristics play an important role in perpetuating teen suicide clusters and thwarting prevention efforts, according to a new study by sociologists who examined clusters in a single town. The study illustrates how the homogeneous culture and high degree of social connectedness of a community can increase suicide risk, particularly among teenagers.

... Read more »

  • September 6, 2016
  • 12:34 AM
  • 383 views

Why a multilingual social imagination matters

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

Last week I was fortunate to be able to attend the 2016 annual conference of the British Association of Applied...... Read more »

  • September 4, 2016
  • 03:25 PM
  • 349 views

Parents' math skills 'rub off' on their children

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Parents who excel at math produce children who excel at math. This is according to a recently released study, which shows a distinct transfer of math skills from parent to child. The study specifically explored intergenerational transmission--the concept of parental influence on an offspring's behavior or psychology--in mathematical capabilities.

... Read more »

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