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  • November 16, 2014
  • 01:47 PM
  • 135 views

Soldiers and Suicide: A familiar tale

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

As a Marine, there is a special place in my heart for all things military. While most protesters are busy arguing about the people who are dying overseas, there is an even more disheartening statistic — the suicide statistics of service members here at home. Suicide is an ugly word, so it’s no surprise that there is not a large movement fighting for better care and a new study done on soldiers doesn’t help.... Read more »

  • November 15, 2014
  • 07:28 AM
  • 222 views

How Your Facebook Updates Reveal Your Personality

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

The words you use in your Facebook profile reveal much about your personality, according to psychologists Gregory Park and colleagues in a new study just published. Based on a study of 71,000 Facebook users who reported their personality using an app, Park et al. found some quite unexpected words to be associated with given personality […]The post How Your Facebook Updates Reveal Your Personality appeared first on Neuroskeptic.... Read more »

Park G, Schwartz HA, Eichstaedt JC, Kern ML, Kosinski M, Stillwell DJ, Ungar LH, & Seligman ME. (2014) Automatic Personality Assessment Through Social Media Language. Journal of personality and social psychology. PMID: 25365036  

  • November 14, 2014
  • 07:20 PM
  • 173 views

Evolutionary Sins: The Gender Gap In Spatial Cognition And Navigation

by Alexis Delanoir in How to Paint Your Panda

Recent research based on the Twe and Tjimba people of northwestern Namibia is suggested to lend evidence that gender gaps in spatial cognition are a result of evolutionary pressures, as men with higher spatial cognition are more successful in these tribes at mating and producing offspring. This post examines the literature and comes to a different conclusion, warning against hasty evolutionary explanations for behavioural traits.... Read more »

  • November 14, 2014
  • 06:41 AM
  • 90 views

Reformers say psychologists should change how they report their results, but does anyone understand the alternative?

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

The rectangular bars indicate samplemeans and the red lines represent theconfidence intervals surrounding them.Image: Audriusa/WikipediaPsychological science is undergoing a process of soul-searching and self-improvement. The reasons vary but include failed replications of high-profile findings, evidence of bias in what gets published, and surveys suggestive of questionable research practices.Among the proposed solutions is that psychologists should change the way they report their fin........ Read more »

Hoekstra, R., Morey, R., Rouder, J., & Wagenmakers, E. (2014) Robust misinterpretation of confidence intervals. Psychonomic Bulletin , 21(5), 1157-1164. DOI: 10.3758/s13423-013-0572-3  

  • November 14, 2014
  • 04:40 AM
  • 165 views

One fifth of schizophrenia cases linked to Toxoplasma gondii?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"The PAF [population attributable fraction] for schizophrenia in those exposed to T. gondii is tentatively 21.4%". That was the headline conclusion made by Prof. Gary Smith [1] in his modelling analysis estimating what percentage of cases of schizophrenia might involve the protozoan Toxoplasma gondii. Some of the accompanying media about this potentially very important finding can be found here and here.You don't need to study scaring, you just do it.Although no expert on the PAF - defined as [2........ Read more »

  • November 13, 2014
  • 09:30 AM
  • 141 views

Can I Use Mechanical Turk (MTurk) for a Research Study?

by Richard Landers in NeoAcademic

Amazon Mechanical Turk (MTurk) has quickly become a highly visible source of participants for human subjects research. Psychologists, in particular, have begun to use MTurk as a major source of quick, cheap data. Studies with hundreds or thousands of participants can be identified in mere days, or sometimes, even a few hours. When it takes […]The post Can I Use Mechanical Turk (MTurk) for a Research Study? appeared first on NeoAcademic.Related articles from NeoAcademic:Gamification, Social........ Read more »

Landers, R.N., & Behrend, T.S. (2015) An inconvenient truth: Arbitrary distinctions between organizational, Mechanical Turk, and other convenience samples. Industrial and Organizational Psychology, 8(2). info:/

  • November 13, 2014
  • 08:49 AM
  • 140 views

Babies' anxiety levels are related to their fathers' nervousness, not their mothers'

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

Picture a one-year-old infant crawling across a table top. Half way across, the surface becomes transparent so that it appears there is a deep drop. On the other side is the infant's mother or father, encouraging them to crawl across the "visual cliff". Will the baby's anxiety levels be influenced more by the mother's own anxiety or the father's?This was the question posed by Eline Möller and her colleagues in what is the first ever study to examine paternal behaviour in the classic visual........ Read more »

  • November 13, 2014
  • 04:45 AM
  • 134 views

More gluten sensitivity and schizophrenia

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Dude means a regular sort of person..."Our study in 100 people with schizophrenia compared to 100 matched controls replicates a higher prevalence of gluten sensitivity and higher mean antigliadin IgG antibody levels [in] schizophrenia".So said one of the conclusions of the paper by Jessica Jackson and colleagues [1] as the results further stack up implicating immune function and diet in relation to at least some cases of schizophrenia. That being said, researchers did not find any "rob........ Read more »

Jackson J, Eaton W, Cascella N, Fasano A, Santora D, Sullivan K, Feldman S, Raley H, McMahon RP, Carpenter WT Jr.... (2014) Gluten sensitivity and relationship to psychiatric symptoms in people with schizophrenia. Schizophrenia research. PMID: 25311778  

  • November 13, 2014
  • 03:36 AM
  • 131 views

JUST PUBLISHED: Does Playing Action Video Games Really Improve Your Information Processing?

by Mark Rubin in The University of Newcastle's School of Psychology Newsline

Over the last decade, a number of studies have been published that suggest that playing action video games improves performance on sensory, perceptual, and attentional tasks. For instance, Green, Pouget, and Bavelier (2010) found that playing action video games led to faster information processing, reduced response caution, and no difference in motor responding. These and related findings are sufficiently hot right now that they often make it to popular science outlets like Ted talks (for exampl........ Read more »

van Ravenzwaaij, D., Boekel, W., Forstmann, B. U., Ratcliff, R., & Wagenmakers, E. J. (2014) Action video games do not improve the speed of information processing in simple perceptual tasks. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 143(5), 1794-805. PMID: 24933517  

  • November 12, 2014
  • 04:38 PM
  • 147 views

Ever wonder how the brain maps our world?

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Sometimes we go into automatic, that “new” coffee shop on your way to work you just noticed, well it has been there for weeks. We can gauge where we are from just about anywhere we have already been. Giving directions, well some of us can never do that, yet we can still get from point A to B easy enough. Yet if we were to drive or even walk backwards and the world wouldn’t feel quite right, things would feel and seem just a little weird — not just because we are used to seeing things pas........ Read more »

  • November 12, 2014
  • 08:30 AM
  • 125 views

Should Pets be Included in Emergency Planning?

by CAPB in Companion Animal Psychology Blog

And can they help vulnerable people be more resilient?Photo: Nika Art / ShutterstockA new paper by Thompson et al (2014) in Australia considers how pets can be incorporated into planning for emergencies such as earthquakes, floods, hurricanes and forest fires. It can quite literally be a matter of life and death. For example, they say, “over 8% of flood-related fatalities in Australia from 1788 to September 1996 resulted from people’s attempts to save ‘stock, property or pets’ – even w........ Read more »

Lem, M.,, Coe, J.B.,, Haley, D.B.,, Stone, E.,, & O'Grady, W. (2013) Effects of companion animal ownership among Canadian street-involved youth: A qualitative analysis. Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare, 40(4), 285-304. info:/

  • November 12, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 134 views

Non-citizen? Undocumented? Watch out for jury sentencing!

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

You are likely familiar with the fact that African-Americans and Hispanics often receive harsher sentences than do White defendants. So where do you think the undocumented immigrant or non-citizen would fall in that lineup? The undocumented receive the harshest sentences and non-citizens (who are in the country legally) come in second. Why? The authors of […]

Related posts:
Are they “illegal aliens” or “undocumented workers”?
Go to jail. Go directly to jail. And if you are a woma........ Read more »

  • November 12, 2014
  • 06:40 AM
  • 136 views

Loneliness is a disease that changes the brain's structure and function

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

Loneliness increases the risk of poor sleep, higher blood pressure, cognitive and immune decline, depression, and ultimately an earlier death. Why? The traditional explanation is that lonely people lack life’s advisors: people who encourage healthy behaviours and curb unhealthy ones. If so, we should invest in pamphlets, adverts and GP advice: ignorance is the true disease, loneliness just a symptom.But this can’t be the full story. Introverts with small networks aren’t at especial health ........ Read more »

Cacioppo, S., Capitanio, J., & Cacioppo, J. (2014) Toward a neurology of loneliness. Psychological Bulletin, 140(6), 1464-1504. DOI: 10.1037/a0037618  

  • November 12, 2014
  • 04:53 AM
  • 101 views

An inflammatory autism subtype?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

The paper from Hiram Jyonouchi and colleagues [1] (open-access) continues a theme from this author with their suggestion of "an imbalance in the production of inflammatory (IL-1ß and IL-6) and counterregulatory (IL-10) cytokines by ‘flare’ ASD-IS [autism spectrum disorder - inflammatory subtype] monocytes".Panic on the streets of Birmingham...'Flare' ASD-IS in this case refers to a coding given to a small participant group (n=24) who were: "defined as those with a history of ........ Read more »

  • November 11, 2014
  • 09:34 PM
  • 324 views

Video Gaming and Internet Addiction : Harmful or Harmless?

by Wiley Asia Blog in Wiley Asia Blog - Social Science

The more the addiction to video games, Internet and social media is increased among teenagers and young adults, the more concerned the parents become. It is where family therapists play an important role. Are video games really bad for children? How to counter addiction to social media? Researchers explored the impact for these new forms of entertainment to assist family therapists.

When researchers compared two groups of players who played massive multiplayer online role-playing games (MMORP........ Read more »

  • November 11, 2014
  • 11:55 AM
  • 149 views

Recovering from an Eating Disorder in a Society that Loves Fat Shaming (and Dieting)

by Tetyana in Science of Eating Disorders


Is ED recovery easier when your body is “normative or stereotypically desirable”? The anon asking the question implied that recovery could be more difficult because “an obese person … will never stop hearing hearing extremely triggering stuff about their body type.” Anon asked, “Have there been any studies on this?” Andrea tackled this question in her last post (it might be helpful to read it first if you haven’t yet); in this post, I........ Read more »

Bulik, C.M., Marcus, M.D., Zerwas, S., Levine, M.D., & La Via, M. (2012) The changing "weightscape" of bulimia nervosa. The American Journal of Psychiatry, 169(10), 1031-6. PMID: 23032383  

McKisack, C., & Waller, G. (1997) Factors influencing the of group psychotherapy for bulimia nervosa. The International Journal of Eating Disorders, 22(1), 1-13. PMID: 9140730  

  • November 11, 2014
  • 11:54 AM
  • 108 views

Recovering from an Eating Disorder in a Society that Loves Fat Shaming (and Dieting)

by Tetyana in Science of Eating Disorders

Is ED recovery easier when your body is “normative or stereotypically desirable”? The anon asking the question implied that recovery could be more difficult because “an obese person … will never stop hearing hearing extremely triggering stuff about their body type.” Anon asked, “Have there been any studies on this?” Andrea tackled this question in her last post (it might be helpful to read it first if you haven’t yet); in this post, I will expand ........ Read more »

Bulik, C.M., Marcus, M.D., Zerwas, S., Levine, M.D., & La Via, M. (2012) The changing "weightscape" of bulimia nervosa. The American Journal of Psychiatry, 169(10), 1031-6. PMID: 23032383  

McKisack, C., & Waller, G. (1997) Factors influencing the of group psychotherapy for bulimia nervosa. The International Journal of Eating Disorders, 22(1), 1-13. PMID: 9140730  

  • November 11, 2014
  • 10:14 AM
  • 122 views

You can guess soccer player's game with his face

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

Main Points:

Soccer player’s face can help in predicting the performance of the player on the field. It can also show the tendency of players towards goals as well as fouls during the game.

Published in:

Adaptive Human Behavior and Physiology

Study Further:

Researchers from the University of Colorado Boulder and their collaborators have found that the face of the player can be used to know about the performance of the player in the game. With proper study, goal or foul makin........ Read more »

  • November 11, 2014
  • 05:29 AM
  • 122 views

Who are the most eminent psychologists of the modern era?

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

A new paper identifies Albert Bandura as themost eminent psychologist of the modern era.Twelve years ago the behaviourist B.F. Skinner topped a list of the 100 most eminent psychologists of the twentieth century, followed by Jean Piaget and Sigmund Freud. Now a team led by Ed Diener has used their own criteria to compile a list of the 200 most eminent psychologists of the modern era (i.e. people whose careers occurred primarily after 1956).Here is the top 10: Albert Bandura in first place, ........ Read more »

Diener, E., Oishi, S., & Park, J. (2014) An incomplete list of eminent psychologists of the modern era. Archives of Scientific Psychology, 2(1), 20-31. DOI: 10.1037/arc0000006  

  • November 11, 2014
  • 04:50 AM
  • 357 views

Psychiatric comorbidity in post H1N1 vaccination narcolespy?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

I can imagine that the paper by Atilla Szakács and colleagues [1] is likely to draw some rather differing opinions about potential importance based on their subject matter and methods/participant numbers looking at the frequency of psychiatric comorbidity among those with narcolepsy including narcolepsy post H1N1 vaccination. The fact that autism - "pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (i.e., atypical autism)" - is mentioned as one of the comorbidity in the post-vaccination ........ Read more »

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