Post List

Psychology posts

(Modify Search »)

  • September 9, 2014
  • 12:26 PM
  • 129 views

When you set sad lyrics against happy music, the music wins

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

The Beatles' Hello, Goodbye featuressad lyrics and a happy tuneIt's a quirk of human nature that many of us enjoy sad music. Research last year uncovered some reasons why, including feeling a sense of connection, and the aesthetic appeal. For a new study, Kazuma Mori and Makoto Iwanaga drilled down into the specific situation where sad lyrics are combined with happy music, as in the Beatles' Hello, Goodbye. They wanted to see how people would respond to the music or lyrics in isolation, and how ........ Read more »

  • September 9, 2014
  • 04:35 AM
  • 122 views

The gondii and generalised anxiety disorder

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) has been absent from discussions on this blog for a while now. I'm going to remedy that today with this post talking about the paper from Markovitz and colleagues [1] who concluded: "T. gondii infection may play a role in the development of GAD [generalized anxiety disorder]"."You have saved our lives. We are eternally grateful"Based on participants taking part in the Detroit Neighborhood Health Study exposure to T. gondii "defined by seropositivity a........ Read more »

Markovitz A, Simanek AM, Yolken R, Galea S, Koenen KC, Chen S, & Aiello AE. (2014) Toxoplasma gondii and anxiety disorders in a community-based sample. Brain, behavior, and immunity. PMID: 25124709  

  • September 9, 2014
  • 12:53 AM
  • 54 views

The “A,B,Cs” of Interests and How You [Lawyers] Can Know Them

by Dan DeFoe in Psycholawlogy

You [lawyers] have interests.  Interests provide us potent motivation for goal-oriented behavior.  We should not ignore them because interests, a very important individual difference trait variable, “are powerful predictors of educational and career choice, performance, and success”.  A recent review of psychological science literature by leading scholars provides a concise summary of current knowledge [...]
The post The “A,B,Cs” of Interests and How You [Lawyers] Can Know The........ Read more »

Rounds, J., & Su, R. (2014) The Nature and Power of Interests. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 23(2), 98-103. DOI: 10.1177/0963721414522812  

  • September 8, 2014
  • 04:40 PM
  • 129 views

“If I do that, I’ll be in more pain and won’t sleep and …” Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia reformulated

by Bronwyn Thompson in Healthskills: Skills for Healthy Living

The TSK has been used for many years now as a good measure of kinesiophobia. Usually scores of above 45 (from a possible 68) suggest that the person has beliefs that their pain represents ongoing damage (Somatic focus) and that they should avoid doing anything that provokes pain (Activity avoidance). High scores have been associated with a wide range of negative outcomes including pain intensity, disability, distress – and in a wide range of individuals including people with chronic low b........ Read more »

  • September 8, 2014
  • 08:00 AM
  • 162 views

I’ll Wager That You Bet On Football, Or Maybe Football

by Mark E. Lasbury in The 'Scope

Betting on American football and football proper is a trillion dollar a year industry. Why do only 4% of gamblers become addicted. Some of it is actually due to the games themselves. New research is showing that a belief in your knowledge of the game and the “near miss” wherein you almost win your bet, are strong factors in dopamine signaling in the reward centers of the brain.... Read more »

Anselme P, & Robinson MJ. (2013) What motivates gambling behavior? Insight into dopamine's role. Frontiers in behavioral neuroscience, 182. PMID: 24348355  

Huberfeld R, Gersner R, Rosenberg O, Kotler M, & Dannon PN. (2013) Football gambling three arm-controlled study: gamblers, amateurs and laypersons. Psychopathology, 46(1), 28-33. PMID: 22890307  

Khazaal Y, Chatton A, Billieux J, Bizzini L, Monney G, Fresard E, Thorens G, Bondolfi G, El-Guebaly N, Zullino D.... (2012) Effects of expertise on football betting. Substance abuse treatment, prevention, and policy, 18. PMID: 22578101  

Zhou K, Tang H, Sun Y, Huang GH, Rao LL, Liang ZY, & Li S. (2012) Belief in luck or in skill: which locks people into gambling?. Journal of gambling studies / co-sponsored by the National Council on Problem Gambling and Institute for the Study of Gambling and Commercial Gaming, 28(3), 379-91. PMID: 21894576  

Grötsch P, Lange C, Wiesbeck GA, & Lang U. (2013) Pathological Gambling Induced by Dopamine Antagonists: A Case Report. Journal of gambling studies / co-sponsored by the National Council on Problem Gambling and Institute for the Study of Gambling and Commercial Gaming. PMID: 24356928  

  • September 8, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 186 views

Does Face-to-Face Interaction Promote Honesty?

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

I listen to a lot of audiobooks while traveling. But sometimes I want something less lengthy than a full book and so I turn to podcasts. Recently, I was on a plane and turned on an episode of the NPR TED Radio Hour podcast on Why We Lie. It’s an interesting and wide-ranging look at […]

Related posts:
Never trust a man with a wide face
I can tell from your face that you are suicidal
A law firm’s financial success & the managing partners’ face


... Read more »

  • September 8, 2014
  • 05:11 AM
  • 108 views

Why your team should appoint a "meta-knowledge" champion - one person who's aware of everyone else's area of expertise

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

Being on top of "who knows what" is crucial for any team. If I were scheduled to meet a new client from an unfamiliar industry, it would be handy to know that my office-mate had worked in that area for years and could offer me some tips. But how is this team meta-knowledge (knowledge of who knows what) best handled? New research suggests teams, especially those composed of specialists, gain an advantage when they concentrate this information in the hands of one person instead of spreading it thi........ Read more »

  • September 8, 2014
  • 04:22 AM
  • 128 views

Homocysteine, MTHFR and schizophrenia studied AND meta-analysed

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"Our study suggests that increased plasma total homocysteine levels may be associated with an increased risk of schizophrenia". Further: "The meta-analysis of the Japanese genetic association studies demonstrated a significant association between the MTHFR C677T polymorphism and schizophrenia".MTHFR (again!) @ Paul WhiteleySo said the results of the study and meta-analysis carried out by Akira Nishi and colleagues [1] (open-access) looking at the 'big H' alongside everyone's genetic Scrabbl........ Read more »

  • September 6, 2014
  • 12:10 PM
  • 146 views

Women and sexual assault: Unfortunate news…

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

I was debating about this new study. On one hand it’s important to share all sorts of different findings. On the other hand, my faith in humanity was more than just a little shaken, but there is no point on sweeping it under the rug. So disturbing news for women on college campuses, a new study indicates that female college students who are victims of sexual assault are at a much higher risk of becoming victims again. Please hold your disgust till the end…... Read more »

  • September 6, 2014
  • 06:26 AM
  • 187 views

“Cyranoids”: Stanley Milgram’s Creepiest Experiment

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

Imagine that someone else was controlling your actions. You would still look like you, and sound like you, but you wouldn’t be the one deciding what you did and what you said. Now consider: would anyone notice the difference? In this nightmarish scenario, you would be a “cyranoid” – in the terminology introduced by psychologist […]The post “Cyranoids”: Stanley Milgram’s Creepiest Experiment appeared first on Neuroskeptic.... Read more »

  • September 5, 2014
  • 08:03 AM
  • 82 views

People's belief in free will is lower when they need to urinate or desire sex

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

Embodied or grounded cognition is the name for the idea that physical states affect our thoughts and emotions. It's a controversial field, but typical findings include people's judgments of social closeness being shaped by room temperature, and their attentional style by the clothes they wear. A new paper takes things further, asking whether bodily states affect people's philosophical beliefs, specifically their belief in the notion of free will, defined and measured here in the lay sense o........ Read more »

  • September 5, 2014
  • 05:04 AM
  • 152 views

Extremes of a self-limiting diet in autism

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

I'll draw your attention to three papers in today's post which represent the extremes of where self-imposed dietary restrictions can potentially lead in relation to the autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Issues with diet - outside of use of diet as an intervention measure - are something which have been talked about quite a bit in the autism research literature (see here)."You look like a gangster"The first paper by Baird & Ravindranath [1] describes a case report of an 11-year old with ........ Read more »

Baird JS, & Ravindranath TM. (2014) Vitamin B Deficiencies in a Critically Ill Autistic Child With a Restricted Diet. Nutrition in clinical practice : official publication of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition. PMID: 25112945  

Gulko E, Collins LK, Murphy RC, Thornhill BA, & Taragin BH. (2014) MRI findings in pediatric patients with scurvy. Skeletal radiology. PMID: 25109378  

  • September 5, 2014
  • 12:34 AM
  • 106 views

Brief Mindfulness Meditation Primer for Lawyers

by Dan DeFoe in Psycholawlogy

Can lawyers learn about its distinct components, and practice a process which involves interrelated components of attention regulation, body awareness, emotion regulation, and change in perspective on the self, and reach higher levels of self-compassion and well-being?  Stated another way, the question asks  “Can lawyers learn and practice mindfulness meditation?”  The short answer is [...]
The post Brief Mindfulness Meditation Primer for Lawyers appeared first on Psycholawlogy.
... Read more »

  • September 4, 2014
  • 01:34 PM
  • 156 views

Total Recall: How the Brain Processes Color and Motion

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Despite the barrage of visual information the brain receives almost constantly, it retains a remarkable ability to focus on important and relevant items. This fall, for example, NFL quarterbacks will be rewarded handsomely for how well they can focus their attention on color and motion – being able to quickly judge the jersey colors of teammates and opponents and where they’re headed is a valuable skill. How the brain accomplishes this feat, however, has been poorly understood.... Read more »

Guilhem Ibosemail, & David J. Freedman. (2014) Dynamic Integration of Task-Relevant Visual Features in Posterior Parietal Cortex. Neuron. info:/http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.neuron.2014.08.020

  • September 4, 2014
  • 09:42 AM
  • 89 views

Drop the strut: Both men and women find humility more attractive

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

By guest blogger Temma Ehrenfeld.There’s been much debate about the “cheerleader effect,” the idea that men are wired to attract desirable mates by showing off in silly ways. The effect may not even exist, but if it does, they might try humility instead. New research suggests that both men and women prefer humble to less humble partners.The studies are part of a push to define humility, a concept associated less with science than Christianity, as in Matthew 11:29 where Jesus says “I am........ Read more »

  • September 4, 2014
  • 04:51 AM
  • 126 views

Epigenetic processes and autism: focusing on immune function?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Although the title of this post talks about the science of epigenetics in autism, I'm actually going to be talking about two papers today, one of which also covers exposure to prenatal immune activation and what effect that might have on epigenetic processes in the mouse brain. This may also be relevant to at least some autism..."Beneath this mask there is an idea, Mr. Creedy. And ideas are bulletproof"First off we have the paper from Nardone and colleagues [1] (open-access) which, following som........ Read more »

Nardone, S., Sharan Sams, D., Reuveni, E., Getselter, D., Oron, O., Karpuj, M., & Elliott, E. (2014) DNA methylation analysis of the autistic brain reveals multiple dysregulated biological pathways. Translational Psychiatry, 4(9). DOI: 10.1038/tp.2014.70  

  • September 4, 2014
  • 04:48 AM
  • 125 views

Want people to care about the environment? Don't overplay the power of science

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

When people are presented with a picture of rapid scientific progress, they are less likely to engage in environmentally friendly behaviours. This is the conclusion reached across a series of experiments in which students were presented with a short newspaper article on science's achievements and future prospects.The news article came in two flavours. Participants in the "progress" condition read a uniformly positive perspective, lauding medical advances and new technologies to combat climate ch........ Read more »

  • September 3, 2014
  • 02:55 PM
  • 72 views

Compulsive Poetry In Epilepsy

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

The case of a woman who began compulsively writing poems after being treated for epilepsy offers a rare glimpse into the ‘inner’ dimension of a neurological disorder. Here’s the paper in Neurocase from British neurologists Woollacott and colleagues. The story in a nutshell: the patient, age 76, had been suffering from memory lapses and episodic […]The post Compulsive Poetry In Epilepsy appeared first on Neuroskeptic.... Read more »

Woollacott IO, Fletcher PD, Massey LA, Pasupathy A, Rossor MN, Caine D, Rohrer JD, & Warren JD. (2014) Compulsive versifying after treatment of transient epileptic amnesia. Neurocase, 1-6. PMID: 25157425  

  • September 3, 2014
  • 01:22 PM
  • 137 views

Adopting Shelter Dogs: Should Fido Lie Down or Play?

by CAPB in Companion Animal Psychology Blog

 If you go down to the shelter today, will you bring home a dog? A new study by Alexandra Protopopova and Clive Wynne (2014) finds that interactions between dogs and potential adopters predict the likelihood of adoption.Photo: Alexey Shinkevich / ShutterstockEvery year in the USA, 3-4 million healthy, potentially-adoptable, homeless animals are euthanized (AHA and PetSmart 2012). Many would be saved if there was a better understanding of how to increase adoptions from animal shelters. Previ........ Read more »

  • September 3, 2014
  • 08:01 AM
  • 183 views

The Kanisza Triangle: You Can’t Believe Your Eyes

by Rebecca A. Zarate in United Academics

How does the brain decide what the larger, gestalt picture is? From this demonstration, Kok and De Lange concluded it is “an interactive process between higher-order visual areas and V1, wherein activity in V1 is modulated in a highly specific way according to the perceptual hypothesis provided by higher-order areas.” In essence, higher areas of the brain (top-down processes) are making gestalt type guesses, expectations, and assumptions that affect what your senses perceive... Read more »

join us!

Do you write about peer-reviewed research in your blog? Use ResearchBlogging.org to make it easy for your readers — and others from around the world — to find your serious posts about academic research.

If you don't have a blog, you can still use our site to learn about fascinating developments in cutting-edge research from around the world.

Register Now

Research Blogging is powered by SMG Technology.

To learn more, visit seedmediagroup.com.