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  • February 24, 2015
  • 10:31 AM
  • 90 views

Recruiters think they can tell your personality from your resume. They can't

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

Recruiters are poor at inferring an applicant’s personality from their resume, but that doesn’t stop them from jumping to conclusions on the back of their flawed assumptions. That’s according to a new study that involved over a hundred professional recruiters evaluating pairs of resumes.The US-based recruiters estimated applicant personality from the limited information in short two-page resumes. Their estimates were poorly correlated with the self-ratings made by the MBA students who’d ........ Read more »

Burns, G., Christiansen, N., Morris, M., Periard, D., & Coaster, J. (2014) Effects of Applicant Personality on Resume Evaluations. Journal of Business and Psychology, 29(4), 573-591. DOI: 10.1007/s10869-014-9349-6  

  • February 24, 2015
  • 05:53 AM
  • 128 views

Only Non-Depressed See Monster In The Mirror

by chiara civardi in United Academics

Try this experiment and you will have goosebumps all over your body: stare at your face in the mirror in a dimly lit room. Keep staring at yourself for a few minutes. Hey, wait! What was that? Did you see it? Was it a monster, an animal, your deformed face, someone else you know, or a stranger?... Read more »

  • February 24, 2015
  • 04:38 AM
  • 116 views

Maternal recall vs. medical records: implications for autism research

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

I don't want to dwell too much on the findings reported by Paula Krakowiak and colleagues [1] talking about the accuracy of "maternally-reported diabetes and hypertensive disorders, and reliability of BMI [body mass index] measurements during periconception and pregnancy compared with medical records when mothers are interviewed 2-5 years after delivery" but they are potentially important.With authors such as Krakowiak and Irva Hertz-Picciotto on the paper in question, those who f........ Read more »

  • February 23, 2015
  • 03:54 PM
  • 108 views

Mistargeted Messages Could Spur Help-Seeking for Depression

by amikulak in Daily Observations

From decades of research, scientists have developed effective, empirically-validated interventions for treating major depression and, yet, many people suffering from depression don’t receive these treatments. While there can be many reasons […]... Read more »

  • February 23, 2015
  • 12:45 PM
  • 95 views

Work harder by remembering you don't have to work

by Katharine Blackwell in Contemplating Cognition

What things will you do this week, not because you particularly want to, but because you feel you have to? For many people, this probably includes everything work related, from waking up early in the morning, to gritting teeth through a rush hour commute, to trying to stay awake through a particularly torturous meeting. Whatever obligation you are dreading this week, would it help you get through it if you remembered that, strictly speaking, you don’t have to do it?... Read more »

  • February 23, 2015
  • 10:34 AM
  • 112 views

The “Backfire Effect”: Correcting false beliefs about vaccines can be surprisingly counterproductive

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

Nearly half of the US population wrongly believes the flu vaccine can give you flu,but correcting this error has the opposite of the desired effectBy guest blogger Simon OxenhamAccording to a new study, 43 per cent of the US population wrongly believes that the flu vaccine can give you flu. In actual fact this is not the case – any adverse reaction, besides a temperature and aching muscles for a short time, is rare. It stands to reason that correcting this misconception would be a good move fo........ Read more »

  • February 23, 2015
  • 04:34 AM
  • 112 views

Late, delayed and mis-diagnosis of autism

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

It's inevitable that with all the mountains of autism research published on a daily basis, certain themes will occur at certain times. My post today is reflective of one of those themes and how, on occasion, the autism diagnostic process does not run as smoothly as we would all like to think.I start this post with a link to an article discussing some forthcoming research to be published titled: 'The autistic pupils ‘traumatised’ by delayed diagnosis'. Describing the results of a survey of pa........ Read more »

Aggarwal S, & Angus B. (2015) Misdiagnosis versus missed diagnosis: diagnosing autism spectrum disorder in adolescents. Australasian psychiatry : bulletin of Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists. PMID: 25653302  

  • February 22, 2015
  • 11:50 PM
  • 123 views

Teaching: So Easy a "Housewife" Could Do It?

by Joshua Fisher in Text Savvy

Two years before the United States put men on the moon, William James Popham and colleagues conducted two very interesting—and to a reader in the 21st century, bizarre—education experiments in southern California which were designed to validate a test they had developed to measure what they called "teacher proficiency."... Read more »

  • February 22, 2015
  • 08:59 PM
  • 56 views

Study Shows Men and Women Face Illness Differently

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr. Vasileios Zikos Assistant Professor Research Institute for Policy Evaluation and Design (RIPED) and School of Economics University of the Thai Chamber of Commerce (UTCC) Bangkok, Thailand Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What … Continue reading →... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Dr. Vasileios Zikos. (2015) Study Shows Men and Women Face Illness Differently. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • February 22, 2015
  • 06:10 AM
  • 142 views

Sick Of Stress: Is Fear Making Us Ill?

by Agnese Mariotti in United Academics

Is stress making us sick? Scientists found that fear of terror increases pulse, the risk of disease and subsequent death.... Read more »

Shenhar-Tsarfaty, S., Yayon, N., Waiskopf, N., Shapira, I., Toker, S., Zaltser, D., Berliner, S., Ritov, Y., & Soreq, H. (2015) Fear and C-reactive protein cosynergize annual pulse increases in healthy adults. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 112(5). DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1418264112  

  • February 21, 2015
  • 05:39 AM
  • 152 views

Coeliac disease: genes, autoimmunity, gut bacteria and bafflement?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Some things in life really do baffle me. When it comes to this blog, nothing seems to baffle me more than some of the talk about the triad that is autoimmunity, coeliac disease and gluten (see here for an example).My bafflement continued upon reading the papers by Emilsson and colleagues [1] and by Olivares and colleagues [2]. Respectively suggesting that: "spouses of individuals with celiac disease are at increased risk of non-celiac autoimmune disease" and "a specific disease-biased host genot........ Read more »

Emilsson L, Wijmenga C, Murray JA, & Ludvigsson JF. (2015) Autoimmune Disease in First-degree Relatives and Spouses of Individuals with Celiac Disease. Clinical gastroenterology and hepatology : the official clinical practice journal of the American Gastroenterological Association. PMID: 25645875  

  • February 20, 2015
  • 11:59 AM
  • 63 views

Over-reassurance after a cancer false alarm may delay help-seeking for future symptoms

by Marie Benz in MedicalResearch.com

MedicalResearch.com Interview with: Dr Cristina Renzi Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, Health Behaviour Research Centre, London, UK MedicalResearch: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Dr. Renzi: Only a minority of … Continue reading →... Read more »

MedicalResearch.com Interview with:, & Dr Cristina Renzi. (2015) Reassurance After False Alarms May Delay Future Cancer Screenings. MedicalResearch.com. info:/

  • February 20, 2015
  • 04:40 AM
  • 81 views

Is self-disgust the emotional trigger that leads to self-harm?

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

To help people who perform non-lethal self-harm, such as cutting and burning themselves, we need a better understanding of the thoughts and feelings that contribute to them resorting to this behaviour. Risk factors are already known, including depression and a history of sexual abuse. However, Noelle Smith and her colleagues wondered if these factors increase the risk of self-harm because they lead people to experience self-disgust. Viewed this way, the researchers believe "self-disgust may serv........ Read more »

Smith, N., Steele, A., Weitzman, M., Trueba, A., & Meuret, A. (2014) Investigating the Role of Self-Disgust in Nonsuicidal Self-Injury. Archives of Suicide Research, 19(1), 60-74. DOI: 10.1080/13811118.2013.850135  

  • February 20, 2015
  • 03:43 AM
  • 149 views

Behavioural sleep intervention for ADHD?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

I was really quite interested to read about the study from Harriet Hiscock and colleagues [1] (open-access) suggesting that: "A brief behavioural sleep intervention modestly improves the severity of ADHD [attention deficit hyperactivity disorder] symptoms in a community sample of children with ADHD." I had heard that these results would be forthcoming based on the publication of the study trial protocol [2] a few years back, alongside the trial entry listed in the ISRCTN registry ........ Read more »

  • February 19, 2015
  • 11:25 AM
  • 144 views

What’s your birth control doing to your brain?

by Katharine Blackwell in Contemplating Cognition

Any woman starting on a birth control pill is warned about some of the physical and emotional effects of those additional hormones floating around in your bloodstream: weight gain. mood swings. acne. headaches. If you’ve followed along popular science reports, you may even have heard that being on the pill could change what kind of person you’re attracted to. Surprisingly, relatively little attention is paid to the fact that those effects result from hormones getting into your brain,........ Read more »

  • February 19, 2015
  • 11:12 AM
  • 138 views

Threat of punishment makes us better judges of our own knowledge

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

People show better understanding oftheir own knowledge when threatenedwith large penalties for wrong answers. There are some walks of life where trying to be right as often as possible is not enough. Just as important is having insight into the likely accuracy of your own knowledge.Think of doctors and surgeons making diagnostic decisions. They can't be right all the time, and neither can they be completely certain over their judgments. What becomes important then, is that they have an accu........ Read more »

  • February 19, 2015
  • 03:39 AM
  • 148 views

Metal sensitisation and chronic fatigue syndrome?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

I have to admit that I pondered longer than usual over whether I should talk about the paper by Vera Stejskal [1] (open-access here) and the idea that: "Patients with CFS [chronic fatigue syndrome] and fibromyalgia are frequently sensitized to metals found in the environment or used in dentistry and surgery."It was't that I doubted that metals - certain types present in the wrong place or wrong concentration - can affect physical and psychological health and wellbeing as per the exampl........ Read more »

  • February 18, 2015
  • 08:30 AM
  • 158 views

What Do Young Children Learn From Pets?

by CAPB in Companion Animal Psychology Blog

Is a better understanding of biology something children can learn from dogs and cats?Young children are very interested in animals. One study even found children aged 11 – 40 months would prefer to look at an animal behind a glass screen (even if the animal is fast asleep) rather than play with a toy (LoBue et al 2013). Now researchers are asking whether this interest in animals means that children with a cat or dog know more about biology than those without.The study, by Megan Geerdts (Univer........ Read more »

  • February 18, 2015
  • 07:02 AM
  • 140 views

 Psychopaths cannot understand punishment—what does that mean for the courtroom?

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

At least that is the headline we’ve been reading about this research. We’ve written before about the psychopath. They are typically characterized as scary and “other” than us—not like us at all. They have been described as without conscience, and yet some of them are involved in corporations rather than prison. There actually are researchers […]

Related posts:
Judges are biased in favor of psychopaths whose “brains made them do it”
Defending the Psychopath: “His brain mad........ Read more »

  • February 18, 2015
  • 05:02 AM
  • 144 views

Fasting Fruit Flies: Improved Focus and Brain Power

by Pieter Carrière in United Academics

Fasting: solely a religious activity or is it also beneficial for focus and brain power? Research links fasting and hunger to formation of long-term memory.... Read more »

Hirano Y, Masuda T, Naganos S, Matsuno M, Ueno K, Miyashita T, Horiuchi J, & Saitoe M. (2013) Fasting launches CRTC to facilitate long-term memory formation in Drosophila. Science (New York, N.Y.), 339(6118), 443-6. PMID: 23349290  

Dubnau J. (2012) Neuroscience. Ode to the mushroom bodies. Science (New York, N.Y.), 335(6069), 664-5. PMID: 22323806  

Quinn, W., Harris, W., & Benzer, S. (1974) Conditioned Behavior in Drosophila melanogaster. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 71(3), 708-712. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.71.3.708  

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