Post List

Psychology posts

(Modify Search »)

  • August 23, 2015
  • 01:49 PM

Want a better relationship and a better sex life?

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

If men take up more of the child-care duties, splitting them equally with their female partners, heterosexual couples have more satisfaction with their relationships and their sex lives, according to new research by sociologists. The group used data from more than 900 heterosexual couples’ responses in the 2006 Marital Relationship Study (MARS).... Read more »

Daniel Fowler et al. (2015) Couples That Split Childcare Duties Have Higher Quality Relationships and Sex Lives . American Sociological Association. info:other/Link

  • August 23, 2015
  • 10:46 AM

Photography – an art, a science, and a job

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

Main Points:

Photography is an interesting task that inspires many people to inspire many others. It starts from the art of creativity and imagination, goes from the science of click and light, and ends with a beautiful memory in the hand or book. For some people, this memory helps them in earning more memories.

So, one of my favorite ideas to earn more memories is through Dreamstime. You can join Dreamstime to earn money and help others to earn money through photography, here:

http://w........ Read more »

Park, D., Lodi-Smith, J., Drew, L., Haber, S., Hebrank, A., Bischof, G., & Aamodt, W. (2013) The Impact of Sustained Engagement on Cognitive Function in Older Adults: The Synapse Project. Psychological Science, 25(1), 103-112. DOI: 10.1177/0956797613499592  

  • August 22, 2015
  • 12:49 PM

Don’t touch that dial: TV’s subliminal influence on women’s perception of pregnancy and birth

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

In an era where popular culture is increasingly recognized for its impact on lay understanding of health and medicine, few scholars have looked at television’s powerful role in the creation of patient expectations, especially regarding pregnancy and birth.... Read more »

Danielle Bessett. (2015) As Seen on TV: Women's Views on Television Representations of Pregnancy and Birth. American Sociological Association’s 110th Annual Meeting. info:other/SES-0402165

  • August 22, 2015
  • 05:19 AM

Maternal folate status and offspring autism risk: where are we up to?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

I'd like to briefly draw your attention to the review published by Elizabeth DeVilbiss and colleagues [1] today, covering "what is known about the role of folate in the aetiology of neurodevelopmental disorders."Folate, is a topic that has graced this blog a few times with autism in mind (see here for example) based on various ideas that folate status during pregnancy might have the ability to modify offspring risk of autism [2] alongside the idea that autoimmune processes might act on fola........ Read more »

  • August 21, 2015
  • 07:02 AM

This and that: The secret to crowdfunding success, cold offices,  and nosy smartphones

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Here’s another collection of interesting tidbits that don’t rate an entire blog post on their own but that we think worthy of mention. Think of them as our contribution to your conversational contributions over dinner, drinks, or to fill that awkward silence that pops up unexpectedly. Be thin, White and attractive for crowdfunding success! It’s […]

Related posts:
A law firm’s financial success & the managing partners’ face
Intergenerational Law Offices and Intergenerationa........ Read more »

  • August 21, 2015
  • 05:56 AM

Free personality tests are more reliable and efficient than the paid variety

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

In most areas of life, we expect the free versions of products to be sub-standard compared with the "premium" paid-for versions. After all, why would anyone pay for something if the free equivalent were better? However, a new study of personality tests boots this logic off the park – psychologists at the University of Texas report in the Journal of Psychology that free tests are more reliable and efficient than their paid-for, proprietary counterparts.To measure test reliability, Tyler Ha........ Read more »

  • August 21, 2015
  • 03:11 AM

Digestive enzymes and autism

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"The ASD [autism spectrum disorder] group receiving digestive enzyme therapy for 3 months had significant improvement in emotional response, general impression autistic score, general behavior and gastrointestinal symptoms. Our study demonstrated the usefulness of digestive enzyme in our population of ASD patients."So said the results of a randomised, placebo-controlled clinical trial published by Khaled Saad and colleagues [1] (open-access available here) on the use of a specific dige........ Read more »

Saad K, Eltayeb AA, Mohamad IL, Al-Atram AA, Elserogy Y, Bjørklund G, El-Houfey AA, & Nicholson B. (2015) A Randomized, Placebo-controlled Trial of Digestive Enzymes in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders. Clinical psychopharmacology and neuroscience : the official scientific journal of the Korean College of Neuropsychopharmacology, 13(2), 188-93. PMID: 26243847  

  • August 20, 2015
  • 02:01 PM

‘Memory region’ of the brain also involved in conflict resolution

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

The hippocampus in the brain’s temporal lobe is responsible for more than just long-term memory. Researchers have for the first time demonstrated that it is also involved in quick and successful conflict resolution.... Read more »

C.R. Oehrn, C. Baumann, J. Fell, H. Lee, H. Kessler, U. Habel, S. Hanslmayr, & N. Axmacher. (2015) Human hippocampal dynamics during response conflict. Current Biology. info:/10.1016/j.cub.2015.07.032

  • August 20, 2015
  • 09:12 AM

Adventure Therapy

by Rodney Steadman in Gravity's Pull

Adventure therapy is the use of challenging situations in unique environments to help someone overcome or cope with a mental health problem.... Read more »

Koperski H, Tucker AR, Lung DM, & Gass MA. (2015) The Impact of Community Based Adventure Therapy on Stress and Coping Skills in Adults. The Practitioner Scholar: Journal of Counseling and Professional Psychology, 4(1), 1-16. info:/

  • August 20, 2015
  • 09:09 AM

Why do more intelligent people live longer?

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

By guest blogger Stuart RitchieIt’s always gratifying, as a psychologist, to feel like you’re studying something important. So you can imagine the excitement when it was discovered that intelligence predicts life expectancy. This finding is now supported by a large literature including systematic reviews, the most recent of which estimated that a difference of one standard deviation in childhood or youth intelligence (that’s 15 IQ points on a standardised scale) is linked to a 24 per cent ........ Read more »

Arden, R., Luciano, M., Deary, I., Reynolds, C., Pedersen, N., Plassman, B., McGue, M., Christensen, K., & Visscher, P. (2015) The association between intelligence and lifespan is mostly genetic. International Journal of Epidemiology. DOI: 10.1093/ije/dyv112  

  • August 20, 2015
  • 08:01 AM

Why It’s Important to Have Diversity (in age!) in Your Work Teams

by Jeremiah Stanghini in Jeremiah Stanghini

If you had to guess, would you say that younger people or older people are better at learning abstract causal principles? When first thinking about this question, I would have thought that older people would be better at this given that … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • August 20, 2015
  • 07:32 AM

The Myth of Beer Goggles?

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

A new study casts doubt on the idea that alcohol causes people to seem more attractive - the famous "beer goggles" effect.

Psychologists Olivia Maynard and colleauges, of Bristol, UK, conducted an unusual "real world" experiment.  Rather than doing their testing in the laboratory, they went into three Bristol pubs in the evening (5-11 pm) and recruited volunteers on the spot. With a total sample size of 311, it was a very large sample.

Each participant was breathalyzed to estimate thei... Read more »

  • August 20, 2015
  • 03:37 AM

Canada and the autism prevalence rate (yet again)

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"At the end of 2013, the prevalence among children born in 2006 was 1 case of autism spectrum disorder per 46 children or 215.77 per 10 000."That was the conclusions reached in the study by Lorine Pelly and colleagues [1] looking at "the incidence and 1-year cohort prevalence for autism spectrum disorders in children less than 15 years of age and living in the Avalon Peninsula at the time of diagnosis." The Avalon Peninsula by the way, is located in Canada.Looking at data derived from the "........ Read more »

  • August 19, 2015
  • 03:43 PM

Happiness spreads, but depression isn’t contagious

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Having friends who suffer from depression doesn’t affect the mental health of others, according to research. The team found that having friends can help teenagers recover from depression or even avoid becoming depressed in the first instance. The findings are the result of a study of the way teenagers in a group of US high schools influenced each others’ mood. The academics used a mathematical model to establish if depression spreads from friend to friend.... Read more »

E. M. Hill, F. E. Griffiths, & T. House. (2015) Spreading of healthy mood in adolescent social networks. Proceedings of the Royal Society B. info:/10.1098/rspb.2015.1180

  • August 19, 2015
  • 02:46 PM

The powerful motivating effect of a near win

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

If you while away time in a games arcade – play some coin pushers here, a few fruit machines there – you will soon be familiar with that frustrating and enlivening sensation of the near win that follows getting four cherries out of five. New research from INSEAD suggests that these tantalising near wins produce high levels of motivational arousal, that encourage us to chase whatever alternative rewards are then available.In one fascinating experiment, Monica Wadhwa and JeeHye Christine Kim g........ Read more »

  • August 19, 2015
  • 11:55 AM

In a Group, Who’s Perceived To Be Dominant? Tall, Mid-Thirty and Male

by Marie Benz in Interview with: Carlota Batres PhD Candidate at the Perception Lab School of Psychology and Neuroscience University of St Andrews   Medical Research: What is the background for this study? What are the main findings? Response:  Dominance in men is associated with … Continue reading →
The post In a Group, Who’s Perceived To Be Dominant? Tall, Mid-Thirty and Male appeared first on Medical Research Interviews and News.
... Read more »

Carlota Batres. (2015) In a Group, Who's Perceived To Be Dominant? Tall, Mid-Thirty and Male. info:/

  • August 19, 2015
  • 08:30 AM

The Beneficial Effects of Watching Fish

by CAPB in Companion Animal Psychology Blog

Spending time observing an aquarium leads to improvements in mood and reductions in heart rate.There are psychological benefits to watching fish and crustaceans in an aquarium, according to a new study by Deborah Cracknell et al. They observed people’s natural interactions with a marine life display, and took heart rate, blood pressure and questionnaire results from 84 experimental participants. But the display wasn’t a fish tank that you could fit in your living room – it was a large exhi........ Read more »

  • August 19, 2015
  • 08:02 AM

Psychologists Want an Alternative to the DSM

by Jeremiah Stanghini in Jeremiah Stanghini

In another life (or a different timeline, if you prefer) I didn’t change paths and continued on to become a clinical psychologist. In that life (or timeline), I, and many other psychologists are using something totally different than the DSM … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • August 19, 2015
  • 02:52 AM

Breast milk protects against GI symptoms in high risk autism?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Happy house @ Paul Whiteley"Late weaning and EBM [exclusive breast milk] were associated with protection against GI [gastrointestinal] symptoms in High-risk infants."That was one of the conclusions presented in the paper by Alexander Penn and colleagues [1] who asked some pretty important questions when it comes to the increasingly strong relationship between bowel issues and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) (see here)."Using questionnaires, diet history and gastrointestinal problems were tra........ Read more »

Penn AH, Carver LJ, Herbert CA, Lai TS, McIntire MJ, Howard JT, Taylor SF, Schmid-Schönbein GW, & Dobkins KR. (2015) Breast Milk Protects Against Gastrointestinal Symptoms in Infants at High Risk for Autism During Early Development. Journal of pediatric gastroenterology and nutrition. PMID: 26230900  

  • August 18, 2015
  • 02:35 PM

Nicotine changes marijuana’s effect on the brain

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

How scientists study the effects of marijuana on the brain is changing. Until recently marijuana research largely excluded tobacco users from its participant pool, but scientists have found reason to abandon this practice, uncovering significant differences in the brains of individuals who use both tobacco and marijuana and the brains of those who only use marijuana.... Read more »

join us!

Do you write about peer-reviewed research in your blog? Use to make it easy for your readers — and others from around the world — to find your serious posts about academic research.

If you don't have a blog, you can still use our site to learn about fascinating developments in cutting-edge research from around the world.

Register Now

Research Blogging is powered by SMG Technology.

To learn more, visit