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  • February 26, 2014
  • 07:00 AM
  • 162 views

Why (some) women (dis)like porn

by Annemarie van Oosten in United Academics

Pornography is considered a male thing and women are expected to dislike it. But is this really true? Research shows hyperfeminine women evaluate pornographic content quite positively. ... Read more »

  • February 26, 2014
  • 04:48 AM
  • 128 views

Pregnancy paracetamol use and offspring ADHD traits?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Poor old paracetamol (acetaminophen if you wish).Tablets (before tablets again) @ WikipediaFirst it was the Brandlistuen correlation [1] suggesting that sustained exposure in-utero may impact on childhood developmental outcome (see here for my take). Now another swipe has been taken at this pharmaceutical stalwart of pain relief / fever reduction with the publication of results by Zeyan Liew and colleagues [2] suggesting that: "Maternal acetaminophen use during preg........ Read more »

  • February 26, 2014
  • 12:32 AM
  • 154 views

Here’s Why Adults Think Teenagers Sleep Too Much

by Eric Horowitz in peer-reviewed by my neurons

The teenage ability to sleep past noon is one of the great joys of adolescence. It’s also one of the great headaches of parenthood. On weekends parents are up bright and early, but try as they might, they can’t get their teenage children to make use of the morning hours. A simple explanation for why […]... Read more »

  • February 25, 2014
  • 12:48 PM
  • 71 views

The root of all value: a neural common currency for choice

by David Spurrett in Common Currencies

Account of an important 2012 review of the functional MRI evidence in human subjects regarding whether all options are represented neurally in a single common currency.... Read more »

Levy, D., & Glimcher, P. (2012) The root of all value: a neural common currency for choice. Current Opinion in Neurobiology, 22(6), 1027-1038. DOI: 10.1016/j.conb.2012.06.001  

  • February 25, 2014
  • 04:02 AM
  • 80 views

No need to look at the score - athletes' body language gives away who's winning and losing

by Christian Jarrett in BPS Research Digest

In a bruising encounter with an aggressor, signalling "I give up!" via your submissive body language can be a life saver. At least that's the case for our primate cousins, and likely too for our human ancestors. For a new study Philip Furley and Geoffrey Schweizer have explored the possibility that this behaviour persists in modern day sporting encounters. Intriguingly, while a loser's automatic submissive signals may be advantageous in real-life violent contexts, in modern sport they likely bac........ Read more »

  • February 24, 2014
  • 03:34 PM
  • 140 views

Taking a Transdiagnostic Approach to Understanding Self-Injury

by amikulak in Daily Observations

Millions of people are affected by self-injury, especially adolescents and young adults.  Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) has been the focus of numerous studies and, yet, there is still a lot to […]... Read more »

  • February 24, 2014
  • 09:00 AM
  • 111 views

Many ways to be mindful

by Katharine Blackwell in Contemplating Cognition

Not long ago I started thinking about the possibility that different types of meditation might lead to different benefits – loving kindness might contribute to social connections and empathy, perhaps, while a body scan might provide some specific health benefits by helping people get in tune with their bodies. The logical next step is to recognize that just as there are many ways of meditating, there are many ways of being mindful. You can be mindful of your body, your emotions, your thoug........ Read more »

  • February 24, 2014
  • 04:58 AM
  • 132 views

Psychologists use baby-cam to study infants' exposure to faces

by Christian Jarrett in BPS Research Digest

An infant sporting the baby-cam, worn upside down to ensure the camerawas level with the eyebrows. Image reproduced with permission of N. Sugden.What does the world look like from a baby's perspective? In the first research of its kind, psychologists in Canada have analysed hours of video footage taken from small cameras worn by babies on their heads. Nicole Sugden and her colleagues were particularly interested in the babies' exposure to faces, to find out whether the kind of faces they were ex........ Read more »

  • February 24, 2014
  • 04:39 AM
  • 140 views

The [universal] early identification of autism or not?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

As I might have already intimated, whilst I'm all in favour of the very early identification of autism and the potential effects this might bring to a child in terms of something like benefiting from early intervention, I'm not overly enthused by the collected evidence which has been amassed so far in this area despite some promising data.Under my umbrellas @ Wikipedia Most people with some knowledge of autism will know that it is an extremely heterogeneous condition, with presentation........ Read more »

Samango-Sprouse CA, Stapleton EJ, Aliabadi F, Graw R, Vickers R, Haskell K, Sadeghin T, Jameson R, Parmele CL, & Gropman AL. (2014) Identification of infants at risk for autism spectrum disorder and developmental language delay prior to 12 months. Autism : the international journal of research and practice. PMID: 24550549  

Stenberg N, Bresnahan M, Gunnes N, Hirtz D, Hornig M, Lie KK, Lipkin WI, Lord C, Magnus P, Reichborn-Kjennerud T.... (2014) Identifying Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder at 18 Months in a General Population Sample. Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. DOI: 10.1111/ppe.12114  

  • February 23, 2014
  • 04:35 PM
  • 149 views

Don't worry, be happy: Could optimism counteract the negative effects of pain?

by Bronwyn Thompson in Healthskills: Skills for Healthy Living

These researchers investigated whether optimism might (a) be able to be induced in people who are currently experiencing pain, and (b) might be able to reduce some of the fatiguing effects of self-regulation depletion. This is based on the notion that people who remain optimistic keep persisting with tasks even when the going is tough. They also investigated whether experimental pain has a direct effect on self-regulation (well, actually, executive task performance which is in turn affected by s........ Read more »

  • February 23, 2014
  • 04:35 PM
  • 120 views

Don't worry, be happy: Could optimism counteract the negative effects of pain?

by Bronwyn Thompson in Healthskills: Skills for Healthy Living

These researchers investigated whether optimism might (a) be able to be induced in people who are currently experiencing pain, and (b) might be able to reduce some of the fatiguing effects of self-regulation depletion. This is based on the notion that people who remain optimistic keep persisting with tasks even when the going is tough. They also investigated whether experimental pain has a direct effect on self-regulation (well, actually, executive task performance which is in turn affected by s........ Read more »

  • February 23, 2014
  • 01:31 PM
  • 91 views

The Evolution of Societal Norms

by Kevin Loftis in Neurobrainstorm

Societal norms form because societies benefit from them over time. Societies, like organisms, evolve certain characteristics. Norms can co-evolve with human evolution or simply evolve separately.... Read more »

  • February 23, 2014
  • 01:25 PM
  • 149 views

Is cat poop making us crazy?

by in Neuroscientifically Challenged

When a woman who owns cats finds out she is pregnant, she will probably be warned to stop cleaning out the litter box. This is because cat feces can harbor a parasite called Toxoplasma gondii, which can cross the placenta and infect an unborn fetus. The infection can increase the risk of premature birth and low birth weight, and is associated with anemia, deafness, hydrocephalus, and mental retardation in the child after birth. Sometimes, if these problems aren't apparent at birth, they can deve........ Read more »

Flegr J. (2013) How and why Toxoplasma makes us crazy. Trends in parasitology, 29(4), 156-63. PMID: 23433494  

  • February 23, 2014
  • 01:08 PM
  • 179 views

Disconnecting Consciousness from the External Environment

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

An very interesting report from a group of French neurosurgeons sheds light on the neural basis of consciousness and dreams. Guillaume Herbet and colleagues describe the case of a 45 year old man in whom electrical stimulation of a particular spot in the brain “induced a dramatic alteration of conscious experience in a highly reproducible […]The post Disconnecting Consciousness from the External Environment appeared first on Neuroskeptic.... Read more »

Herbet G, Lafargue G, de Champfleur NM, Moritz-Gasser S, le Bars E, Bonnetblanc F, & Duffau H. (2014) Disrupting posterior cingulate connectivity disconnects consciousness from the external environment. Neuropsychologia, 239-244. PMID: 24508051  

  • February 23, 2014
  • 11:31 AM
  • 133 views

Are People Wired to Help the Needy?

by Eric Horowitz in peer-reviewed by my neurons

Humans tend to be altruistic creatures. Don’t be fooled by what you see on Black Friday or days when Congress votes on food stamp funding — we like helping each other out. A popular explanation for our behavior is that we have evolved to care for those in need and feel empathy when we come […]... Read more »

  • February 23, 2014
  • 12:25 AM
  • 174 views

"Love at first sight is a myth," say Chicago researchers

by The Neurocritic in The Neurocritic

Social Neuroscience power couple, John T. Cacciopo and Stephanie CacciopoThis, my friends, is a belated Valentine's Day tale that went oh so wrong...On Feb 14, Scientific American ran a piece about When Scientists Are Mad about Each Other. The cutesy narrative on the Cacciopos described a wonderful story of love at first sight:He was studying loneliness and isolation. She was studying love and desire. When they found themselves together, they gravitated toward her end of the ........ Read more »

S Cacioppo, B Couto, M Bolmont. (2013) Selective decision-making deficit in love following damage to the anterior insula. Current Trends in Neurology, 15-19. info:other/

  • February 22, 2014
  • 03:35 PM
  • 117 views

The 10 Strategies Identified by Adolescent Girls for Managing Peer Conflict

by John Wayland in Psych Radar

Many parents, teachers and teaching assistants will know that children and young adults will often fall out and argue. As children develop and reach puberty, these issues become increasingly complex and divisive. Additionally, adult intervention can sometimes serve to exacerbate the situation (Huntley and Owens 2013).Recent research by Huntley and Owens (2013) has successfully identified 10 possible strategies, developed by adolescent girls, that may prove useful in managing peer conflict. Seven........ Read more »

  • February 21, 2014
  • 10:47 AM
  • 160 views

“But I Didn’t Know!” People Show Prejudice-Based Aggression When It’s Easily Deniable

by amikulak in Daily Observations

We’re taught from a young age that it’s not okay to discriminate or show prejudice against others. And this strong social norm is codified in various ways, such as in […]... Read more »

  • February 21, 2014
  • 09:30 AM
  • 12 views

Do Recommendation Letters Actually Tell Us Anything Useful?

by Richard Landers in NeoAcademic

Recommendation letters are one of the most face valid predictors of academic and job performance; it is certainly intuitive that someone writing about someone else whom they know well should be able to provide an honest and objective assessment of that person’s capabilities.  But despite their ubiquity, little research is available on the actual validity […]Related articles from NeoAcademic:GRE: The Personality TestEven If Job Applicants Cheat, Online Testing May Still Increase Job ........ Read more »

Kuncel, N. R., Kochevar, R. J., & Ones, D. S. (2014) A meta-analysis of letters of recommendation in college and graduate admissions: Reasons for hope. International Journal of Selection and Assessment, 22(1), 101-107. info:/10.1111/ijsa.12060

  • February 21, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 150 views

Simple Jury Persuasion: The “tainted altruism effect”

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

People will actually see you more positively when you raise no money for charity at all than they will when you raise $1,000,000 (but skim $100,000 for yourself). Even if you said you were going to keep 10% up front and the charity really did get the $900,000! When you benefit (in any way) from […]

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Simple Jury Persuasion: Using counter-factual thinking to your advantage
Simple Jury Persuasion: Use pre-factual thinking to your advantage in litigation
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