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  • December 12, 2014
  • 03:32 AM
  • 157 views

Party On! (If You're Middle-Class and Young): Age Differences Explain Social Class Differences in University Friendships

by Mark Rubin in Mark Rubin's Social Psychology Research Blog

In a recent meta-analytic review, I found that working-class students are less integrated at university than their middle-class peers. I offered up nine potential explanations for this working-class exclusion effect. It turns out that one of the simplest explanations in this list is also the most promising. It’s all to do with age.Working-class students tend to be older than middle-class students. Why? Most likely because they don’t tend to go to university immediately after school but i........ Read more »

  • December 11, 2014
  • 11:15 PM
  • 225 views

The Male Idiot Theory

by Shelly Fan in Neurorexia

Image credits: bilbypdalgyte.deviantart.com Yes, that’s a thing. According to hospital emergency departments and mortality stats, men are far likelier than women to experience accidental and sporting injuries, as well as...... Read more »

Ben Alexander, Daniel Lendrem, Dennis William Lendrem, Andy Gray, & John Dudley Isaacs. (2014) The Darwin Awards: sex differences in idiotic behaviour. BMJ, 349. info:/Ben Alexander Daniel Lendrem Dennis William Lendrem Andy Gray John Dudley Isaacs

  • December 11, 2014
  • 08:27 PM
  • 178 views

Depression And Stress/Mood Disorders: Causes Of Repetitive Negative Thinking And Ruminations

by Alexis Delanoir in How to Paint Your Panda

Repetitive Negative Thinking (RNT) has been suggested to be of clinical significance as a transdiagnostic process. Research has been conducted to explain the causes of RNT and ruminations but is limited. This article explores the causes and possible solutions to RNT, as well as its clinical implications concerning mood and stress disorders such as major depressive disorder (MDD).... Read more »

Ehring, T., & Watkins, E. (2008) Repetitive Negative Thinking as a Transdiagnostic Process. International Journal of Cognitive Therapy, 1(3), 192-205. DOI: 10.1680/ijct.2008.1.3.192  

Gibb, B., Grassia, M., Stone, L., Uhrlass, D., & McGeary, J. (2011) Brooding Rumination and Risk for Depressive Disorders in Children of Depressed Mothers. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 40(2), 317-326. DOI: 10.1007/s10802-011-9554-y  

  • December 11, 2014
  • 07:14 PM
  • 145 views

Chronic fatigue syndrome by ASIA?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Unicorns, I love them. Unicorns, I love them. ASIA, in the context of this post, does not refer to the continent but rather the suggestion of an: ‘autoimmune (auto-inflammatory) syndrome induced by adjuvants’ and some potentially contentious findings reported by Nancy Agmon-Levin and colleagues [1].Describing a small cohort of participants diagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and/or fibromyalgia (FM), the authors put forward the idea that "some cases CFS and FM can be........ Read more »

  • December 11, 2014
  • 10:29 AM
  • 103 views

Rapport-building interrogation is more effective than torture

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

Past research (pdf) suggests that using torture as a way to extract information or confessions from terror suspects isn't just unethical, it's also ineffective. The advantage of rapport-building interrogation strategies (including respect, friendliness and empathy towards suspects) over more coercive techniques is highlighted once again in a new study that involved interviews with law enforcement interrogators and detainees.The research involved 34 interrogators (1 woman) from several internatio........ Read more »

Goodman-Delahunty, J., Martschuk, N., & Dhami, M. (2014) Interviewing High Value Detainees: Securing Cooperation and Disclosures. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 28(6), 883-897. DOI: 10.1002/acp.3087  

  • December 11, 2014
  • 07:45 AM
  • 130 views

People's support for torture in "ticking time bomb scenarios" is influenced by their desire for retribution

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

In the wake of a report published yesterday into the CIA's use of torture, many people are shocked and appalled. Yet one defence of the practice remains popular - "the ticking time bomb scenario".This is the idea that torture is justified if a suspect knows the location of bomb in a public place, and many lives would be saved if he or she were coerced into telling authorities the location in time for it to be deactivated. The new Senate Intelligence Committee report describes how the ticking tim........ Read more »

  • December 11, 2014
  • 07:37 AM
  • 137 views

Are Poetry and Psychosis Linked?

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

Is there a relationship between poetry and psychosis?

The idea that 'genius' is just one step removed from 'madness' is a venerable one, and psychiatrists and psychologists have spent a great (perhaps an inordinate) amount of time looking for correlations between mental illness and creativity.

Now a new British study has examined whether poets exhibit more traits of psychosis than other people. One of the authors is a published poet, Helen Mort.



The researchers recruited 294 poets i... Read more »

  • December 11, 2014
  • 07:00 AM
  • 176 views

Without it no music?

by Henkjan Honing in Music Matters

A short entry to announce a theme issue on Musicality in Philosophical Transactions B, to be out in February 2015... the year when the worlds first journal dedicated to science will celebrate its 350th anniversary.... Read more »

Honing H, ten Cate C, Peretz I, & Trehub SE. (2015) Without it no music: cognition, biology and evolution of musicality. Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B. info:/10.1098/rstb.2014.0088

  • December 11, 2014
  • 05:09 AM
  • 128 views

Low bone mineral density and non-coeliac gluten sensitivity and autism?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"An elevated frequency of bone mass loss in NCWS [non-celiac wheat sensitivity] patients was found; this was related to low BMI [body mass index] and was more frequent in patients with NCWS associated with other food sensitivity".There is no Easter Bunny. There is no Tooth Fairy. There is no Queen of England.That was the conclusion reached by Antonio Carroccio and colleagues [1] (open-access) looking at a small group of participants diagnosed with something which seems to fal........ Read more »

  • December 11, 2014
  • 12:15 AM
  • 121 views

How to get rid of constant negative thoughts?

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

Main Point:

Simple answer to this question is to have a regular sleep at proper time in the night.

Published in:

Cognitive Therapy and Research

Study Further:

Researchers have reported that “Duration and Timing of Sleep are Associated with Repetitive Negative Thinking”. They have defined Repetitive Negative Thinking (RNT) as “a perseverative and abstract focus on negative aspects of one’s experience”.

Usually, people complain about repetitive negative thoughts affecti........ Read more »

  • December 10, 2014
  • 04:51 PM
  • 144 views

Worms’ “mental GPS” could help improve mental health

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Imagine this, you’ve misplaced your cell phone. You start by scanning where you remember leaving it: on your bureau. You check and double-check the bureau before expanding your search around and below the bureau. Eventually, you switch from this local area to a more global one, widening your search to the rest of your room and beyond.... Read more »

Adam J Calhoun, Sreekanth H Chalasani, Tatyana O Sharpee. (2014) Maximally informative foraging by Caenorhabditis elegans. eLife. info:/http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04220#sthash.lVQ5aANV.dpuf

  • December 10, 2014
  • 03:54 PM
  • 181 views

Depressed? Laughing gas might help

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Nitrous oxide, or laughing gas, has shown early promise as a potential treatment for severe depression in patients whose symptoms don’t respond to standard therapies. In other words, it might actually live up to it’s name and as they say laughter is the best medicine. The pilot study is believed to be the first research in which patients with depression were given laughing gas.... Read more »

Nagele P, Duma A, Kopec M, Gebara MA, Parsoei A, Walker M, Janski A, Pahagopoulos VN, Cristancho P, Miller JP, Zorumski CF, Conway C . (2014) Nitrous oxide for treatment-resistant major depression: a proof-of-concept trial. Biological Psychiatry. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsych.2014.11.016  

  • December 10, 2014
  • 08:30 AM
  • 137 views

The Companion Animal Science Story of the Year?

by CAPB in Companion Animal Psychology Blog

Dogs love learning. Eureka!Photo: Anna Tyurina / ShutterstockScience Borealis challenged Canadian science bloggers to write about the most important science news of the year in their field. It’s incredibly tough to choose one single study. Every week we cover fascinating research about people’s relationships with their pets, and every one of those studies deserves to be chosen. But there was one paper that really captured our readers’ imagination. It’s one of our most shared storie........ Read more »

McGowan RT, Rehn T, Norling Y, & Keeling LJ. (2014) Positive affect and learning: exploring the "Eureka Effect" in dogs. Animal cognition, 17(3), 577-87. PMID: 24096703  

  • December 10, 2014
  • 05:44 AM
  • 136 views

Maternal smoking during pregnancy and offspring autism: no measurable association but...

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Oh. Yes sir. How doth the little bumblebee improve each..."We found no evidence to support a measurable association between maternal prenatal smoking and ASD [autism spectrum disorder] in offspring."That was the conclusion reached in the meta-analysis published by Brittany Rosen and colleagues [1] looking at the collected peer-review literature examining any correlation between maternal tobacco smoking during pregnancy and risk of offspring receipt of a diagnosis of autism or ASD......... Read more »

Rosen BN, Lee BK, Lee NL, Yang Y, & Burstyn I. (2014) Maternal Smoking and Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Meta-analysis. Journal of autism and developmental disorders. PMID: 25432101  

  • December 9, 2014
  • 04:34 PM
  • 127 views

Parents with a Strong Bond Hatch Fearless Chicks

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish



Personality is written not just in the genes, but in the egg yolk. It can even come from the kind of relationship that exists between an animal’s parents. Researchers found new evidence for this when they played matchmaker for several dozen quail. Even though the eggs were taken from their parents before hatching, bird couples in committed relationships had chicks with markedly different behaviors than couples who only dated.

It’s not hard to forge a bond between Japanese quail (Coturn........ Read more »

Le Bot O, Lumineau S, de Margerie E, Pittet F, Trabalon M, & Houdelier C. (2014) Long-life partners or sex friends? Impact of parental pair bond on offspring personality. The Journal of experimental biology, 217(Pt 23), 4184-92. PMID: 25359936  

  • December 9, 2014
  • 06:36 AM
  • 122 views

Anti-Toxoplasma gondii IgM Antibodies in Acute Psychosis

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

A very brief post today to bring to your attention once again the paper by Joel Monroe and colleagues [1] which concluded that there was: "An increased seroprevalence of T. gondii [Toxoplasma gondii] IgM in patients with acute psychosis". I had touched upon this study in a previous post not-so-long-ago covering T. gondii infection and schizophrenia (see here) which also covered some of the various background research history on this topic.Looks like his optometrist has a sense of humor........ Read more »

  • December 8, 2014
  • 06:50 PM
  • 164 views

Don't miss out! Dogs Science from November

by Cobb & Hecht in Do You Believe In Dog?

Catch up! Participate! Plan your conferences for 2015! Check out all the latest in canine science from November here, thanks to the magic of Storify (if you don't see a beautiful array of handy snippets below, please click this link to view)[View the story "Do You Believe in Dog? [01-30 November 2014]" on Storify]Further reading: Cobb M., Paul McGreevy, Alan Lill & Pauleen Bennett (2014). The advent of canine performance science: Offering a sustainable future for working dogs, Behaviour........ Read more »

  • December 8, 2014
  • 04:45 AM
  • 148 views

Significantly shorter leukocyte telomere length in childhood autism

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"These results provided the first evidence that shorter leukocytes telomere length is significantly associated with childhood autism." So said the results reported by Zongchang Li and colleagues [1] (open-access) based on quite a well-powered study (for an initial research foray anyway) looking at "110 autism patients (male 98 and female 12) and 129 healthy controls (male 98 and female 31)".On the behalf of scientists everywhere, I am ashamed to count you amongst us.Quite a good introductio........ Read more »

  • December 8, 2014
  • 12:05 AM
  • 124 views

Athletes Rely on Athletic Trainers for Social Support Following Injury

by Jane McDevitt in Sports Medicine Research (SMR): In the Lab & In the Field

More than 80% of injured college athletes reported social support from their athletic trainers during their recovery, and athletes reporting higher levels of satisfaction with the social support from their athletic trainers were less likely to report depression or anxiety at return to play.... Read more »

  • December 7, 2014
  • 01:16 PM
  • 170 views

Study suggests lefties actually earn less

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Much has been thrown at left-handed people—they are quick to anger, quickly scared and, with the exception of heads of state, are more or less life’s losers. There was even a time where left handedness was “beaten out” of children in school. Conversely, there have been much bestowed upon left-handed people—they are creative and score highly on certain tests. Obviously, scientists need to rely on more than popular notions to make connections, if any, between left-handed people and succe........ Read more »

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