Post List

Psychology posts

(Modify Search »)

  • March 16, 2016
  • 07:02 AM
  • 236 views

”Willful ignorance” and the denigration of others 

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

A while back we wrote about meat-eaters denigrating vegetarians. Apparently it is more common than one might think to make fun of “do-gooders” if you are not a “do-gooder” yourself. Today we are examining research on making fun of those who shop ethically. According to the researchers (from Ohio State University’s marketing department and UT […]

Related posts:
Does the Millennial know that tattoo might be a business  faux pas?
“I am so tired of people mistaking me for a mode........ Read more »

  • March 16, 2016
  • 03:39 AM
  • 243 views

9% of those diagnosed with autism might have optimal outcome?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"Although for many children, Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a lifelong disability, a subset of children with ASD lose their diagnosis and show typical cognitive and adaptive abilities."Unfortunately, that sentence taken from the report by Emily Moulton and colleagues [1] including one Deborah Fein on the authorship list, is not likely to be taken well by some people. Indeed, the whole concept of 'optimal outcome' with autism in mind (see here) has sometimes been met with outright hostility de........ Read more »

  • March 15, 2016
  • 03:44 PM
  • 261 views

Where aging memories get stored in the brain

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Think back to when you were a child. Now instead, try to think of something that happened just a few minutes ago; would you believe that you are using different portions of the brain? When we remember events which occurred recently, the hippocampus is activated. This area in the temporal lobe of the brain is a hub for learning and memory. But what happens, if we try to remember things that took place years or decades ago?

... Read more »

  • March 15, 2016
  • 12:47 PM
  • 219 views

Psychological researchers need to change their practices: here’s why

by Richard Kunert in Brain's Idea

Why is a surprising amount of psychological research unreplicable? Psychology calls itself a science but often falls short on the replication test of scientific merit. I took a closer look at the data to find out why. The journal Psychonomic Bulletin and Review will publish the findings very soon, but the accepted pre-print is already […]... Read more »

  • March 15, 2016
  • 06:38 AM
  • 199 views

Elite golfers describe their experiences of being in the zone

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

They talked about two main states: "making it happen" and "letting it happen"The psychological concept of "flow" has been around for a while and yet it still retains an air of mystery. Most experts agree that it involves an enjoyable sense of being fully absorbed in a task or skill, and that in sporting contexts it often coincides with peak performance. Now further insights into the nature of flow in sport come from a new study of elite golfers published in the Psychology of Sport and Exercise. ........ Read more »

  • March 15, 2016
  • 03:30 AM
  • 261 views

Measuring anxiety comorbid to autism

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Anxiety, whether reaching clinical thresholds or manifesting as something rather more subtle, is a common theme in autism research and practice these days. I've talked about it enough times on this blog (see here and see here for example) reflective of the growth in this peer-reviewed research area that has continued unabated.Recognition of just how 'disabling' anxiety can be for someone on the autism spectrum is fairly widely noted these days. Problems however, still remain in terms of (i) how ........ Read more »

Rodgers J, Wigham S, McConachie H, Freeston M, Honey E, & Parr JR. (2016) Development of the anxiety scale for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASC-ASD). Autism research : official journal of the International Society for Autism Research. PMID: 26887910  

  • March 14, 2016
  • 02:19 PM
  • 257 views

Decrypting a collagen’s role in schizophrenia

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

What would be worse than having bad joints? How about schizophrenia and bad joints? To be fair that isn’t what is suggested, but they may, in fact, be linked. A small peptide generated from a collagen protein may protect the brain from schizophrenia by promoting the formation of neuronal synapses and study may lead to new approaches to treating the mental disorder.

... Read more »

Su, J., Chen, J., Lippold, K., Monavarfeshani, A., Carrillo, G., Jenkins, R., & Fox, M. (2016) Collagen-derived matricryptins promote inhibitory nerve terminal formation in the developing neocortex. The Journal of Cell Biology, 212(6), 721-736. DOI: 10.1083/jcb.201509085  

  • March 14, 2016
  • 02:19 PM
  • 168 views

Decrypting a collagen’s role in schizophrenia

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

What would be worse than having bad joints? How about schizophrenia and bad joints? To be fair that isn’t what is suggested, but they may, in fact, be linked.  A small peptide generated from a collagen protein may protect the brain from schizophrenia by promoting the formation of neuronal synapses and study may lead to […]... Read more »

Su, J., Chen, J., Lippold, K., Monavarfeshani, A., Carrillo, G., Jenkins, R., & Fox, M. (2016) Collagen-derived matricryptins promote inhibitory nerve terminal formation in the developing neocortex. The Journal of Cell Biology, 212(6), 721-736. DOI: 10.1083/jcb.201509085  

  • March 14, 2016
  • 11:17 AM
  • 229 views

Can You Feel the Love Tonight? (A Guest Post)

by Miss Behavior in The Scorpion and the Frog

By Maggie NannenhornIf you’re like me, you never truly realize how quiet winter is until all the sounds of spring come back in a chorus of celebration. Between the birds, crickets, and frogs, you can really hear the love in the air. So you can hear the love, but can you feel the love? Wood frogs are known for their chorus of calls that sound like a duck laughing. Seriously, tell a duck a good knock-knock joke and that is what a male wood frog sounds like when trying to attract a mate. He make........ Read more »

  • March 14, 2016
  • 07:20 AM
  • 266 views

We feel more authentic when we're with other people and behave as they expect us to

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

You might think that being true to yourself means ignoring social pressure and finding your own path. But one of the most in-depth investigations into feelings of authenticity has found the complete opposite appears to be true. Writing in the European Journal of Personality, the researchers led by Alison Lenton at the University of Southampton said their findings show that "more often than not, situational acceptance of external influence is a positive and authentic course of action."The researc........ Read more »

Lenton, A., Slabu, L., & Sedikides, C. (2016) State Authenticity in Everyday Life. European Journal of Personality, 30(1), 64-82. DOI: 10.1002/per.2033  

  • March 14, 2016
  • 07:02 AM
  • 174 views

Want to be seen as a leader? Go work out! 

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

It wasn’t long ago we said all you had to do to be seen as a leader was grow a mustache but apparently this also helps! Men who look “strong” physically are presumed to be good leaders compared to men who do not look strong physically. These researchers had mastered Photoshop so we know their […]

Related posts:
You wanted to be a leader! Act like one! (or else)
Now, that’s a good-looking leader! (At  least, in this group.)
Want to be a leader? Maybe you should grow a  mustache........ Read more »

Lukaszewski, A., Simmons, Z., Anderson, C., & Roney, J. (2015) The Role of Physical Formidability in Human Social Status Allocation. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. DOI: 10.1037/pspi0000042  

  • March 14, 2016
  • 03:49 AM
  • 267 views

Methyl B12 for autism? Placebo-controlled results say maybe...

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"Methyl B12 treatment improved clinician-rated symptoms of ASD [autism spectrum disorder] that were correlated with improvements in measures of methionine metabolism and cellular methylation capacity."Those were the very encouraging results published by Robert Hendren and colleagues [1] who can now update their ClinicalTrials.gov study entry (see here). Building on the ideas that: "Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have been reported to have reduced ability to methylate DNA ........ Read more »

Hendren RL, James SJ, Widjaja F, Lawton B, Rosenblatt A, & Bent S. (2016) Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trial of Methyl B12 for Children with Autism. Journal of child and adolescent psychopharmacology. PMID: 26889605  

  • March 13, 2016
  • 03:40 PM
  • 232 views

New learning procedure for neural networks

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Rustling leaves, a creaking branch: To a mouse, these sensory impressions may, at first, seem harmless — but not if a cat suddenly bursts out of the bush. If so, they were clues of impending life-threatening danger. Researcher Robert Gütig has now found how the brain can link sensory perceptions to events occurring after a delay.

... Read more »

  • March 12, 2016
  • 03:08 PM
  • 264 views

People with anxiety show fundamental differences in perception

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

People suffering from anxiety perceive the world in a fundamentally different way than others, according to a new study. The research may help explain why certain people are more prone to anxiety. The study shows that people diagnosed with anxiety are less able to distinguish between a neutral, “safe” stimulus (in this case, the sound of a tone) and one that had earlier been associated with gaining or losing money.

... Read more »

  • March 12, 2016
  • 03:26 AM
  • 242 views

Psychopharmacologic intervention for adults with autism: systematically reviewed

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"The results indicate that only two medications, fluoxetine and risperidone, can be considered as promising evidence-based practices for adults with ASD [autism spectrum disorder]."So said Lauren Taylor [1] and her (systematic) review of what might work, pharmaceutically speaking, when it comes to managing "behavioural disturbance in adults with ASD." Including over 40 studies examining psychopharmacology in adults diagnosed with ASD, Taylor concluded that many medicines/formulations did no........ Read more »

  • March 11, 2016
  • 02:17 PM
  • 231 views

Finding the circuit for experience-informed decision-making

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

How is the brain able to use past experiences to guide decision-making? A few years ago, researchers discovered in rats that awake mental replay of past experiences is critical for learning and making informed choices. Now, the team has discovered key secrets of the underlying brain circuitry — including a unique system that encodes location during inactive periods.

... Read more »

Kay, K., Sosa, M., Chung, J., Karlsson, M., Larkin, M., & Frank, L. (2016) A hippocampal network for spatial coding during immobility and sleep. Nature, 531(7593), 185-190. DOI: 10.1038/nature17144  

  • March 11, 2016
  • 07:02 AM
  • 275 views

Bad brains and bad behavior: A primer for the attorney 

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

Neurocriminology, say the authors of today’s paper, is “the study of the brain and how it affects antisocial behavior”. When neurocriminology comes to the courtroom, we call it neurolaw and we have blogged about this intersection between neurosciences and law for years. The paper we are posting about today is meant as a primer on […]

Related posts:
A new question for the jury: Did my brain implant make me do it?
Does priming influence behavior of even the “bad boys”?
On brains........ Read more »

Jorgensen, C., Anderson, N., & Barnes, J. (2016) Bad Brains: Crime and Drug Abuse from a Neurocriminological Perspective. American Journal of Criminal Justice, 41(1), 47-69. DOI: 10.1007/s12103-015-9328-0  

  • March 11, 2016
  • 04:29 AM
  • 181 views

Put it away – Spending work breaks on your smartphone is not rejuvenating

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

In the old days, a break from work used to involve a chat in the canteen, a crossword, or time spent gazing out the window. Nowadays, of course, we have smartphones to fill our spare minutes. Is this a good thing? New research published in Computers in Human Behavior suggests that smartphone use may be just as much of a distraction from work as our old habits, but there’s a downside – it leaves us in a poorer mood than if we’d left the handset in the bag.Hongjai Rhee and Sudong Kim asked 4........ Read more »

  • March 11, 2016
  • 04:29 AM
  • 243 views

Introducing MARA: The Mobile Autism Risk Assessment

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

I just had to post an entry about the latest Duda/Wall combo paper [1] continuing their machine learning voyage through autism screening and assessment (see here) culminating in an important end-point: the MARA - Mobile Autism Risk Assessment.So, what is the MARA? Well, we are told it is: "a new, electronically administered, 7-question autism spectrum disorder (ASD) screen to triage those at highest risk for ASD."What seven questions?"1. How well does your child understand spoken language, based........ Read more »

Duda, M., Daniels, J., & Wall, D. (2016) Clinical Evaluation of a Novel and Mobile Autism Risk Assessment. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders. DOI: 10.1007/s10803-016-2718-4  

  • March 11, 2016
  • 02:04 AM
  • 231 views

Science shows part of brain having an important role in violence

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

Main Point:

Violence and aggression is found to be related to a component of hypothalamus in the brain.

Published in:

Nature Neuroscience

Study Further:

In a number of experiments performed by researchers at New York University, researchers found that premeditated violence – bullying, stalking, and possibly sexual aggression – in mice model (and probably in human beings) develops in a particular area of the brain known as the ventrolateral part of the ventromedial hypo........ Read more »

Falkner, A., Grosenick, L., Davidson, T., Deisseroth, K., & Lin, D. (2016) Hypothalamic control of male aggression-seeking behavior. Nature Neuroscience. DOI: 10.1038/nn.4264  

join us!

Do you write about peer-reviewed research in your blog? Use ResearchBlogging.org to make it easy for your readers — and others from around the world — to find your serious posts about academic research.

If you don't have a blog, you can still use our site to learn about fascinating developments in cutting-edge research from around the world.

Register Now

Research Blogging is powered by SMG Technology.

To learn more, visit seedmediagroup.com.