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  • August 20, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 151 views

Be still my heart: A short (one-item!) measure of narcissism? 

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

We are all about short measures of psychological constructs. You might say watching the development of various scales is a hobby here (just look at all these posts!). With rare exception, courts don’t permit lengthy questionnaires, or questions that sound like a psychological screening test. So when the Neuroskeptic blogged about a new one-item scale […]

Related posts:
The GASP scale: A new measure of guilt and shame proneness
Measuring beliefs in the paranormal: The Australian Sheep G........ Read more »

  • August 20, 2014
  • 04:35 AM
  • 164 views

ADHD in DSM-5: what did you think would happen?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"Our results, combined with previous findings, suggest a 27% increase in the expected prevalence of ADHD [attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder] among young adults, comparing DSM-IV to DSM-5 criteria". So said the paper by Matte and colleagues [1] who as part of their study looked at "the prevalence of ADHD according to DSM-5 criteria".Europa @ Wikipedia The changes to the diagnosis of ADHD in DSM-5 can be seen here. The main difference between DSM-IV and DSM-5 diagnosis s........ Read more »

Matte, B., Anselmi, L., Salum, G., Kieling, C., Gonçalves, H., Menezes, A., Grevet, E., & Rohde, L. (2014) ADHD in DSM-5: a field trial in a large, representative sample of 18- to 19-year-old adults. Psychological Medicine, 1-13. DOI: 10.1017/S0033291714001470  

  • August 19, 2014
  • 02:17 PM
  • 178 views

Hobby Lobby and the War on Race and Women

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

There is a war going on and it's not on foreign soil. This war is the fight for the status quo, a war where you are only worth your skin color, a war where you are only worth as much as your gender. This war is all around us, we see it everyday, yet we let it quietly pass us by. We do this because, in all actuality, we are losing this war. I don't blame you if you don't believe me, you shouldn't.[…]... Read more »

  • August 19, 2014
  • 04:58 AM
  • 170 views

How to help an anxious interviewee - be mean to them

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

They've barely taken their seat, but it's obvious that your interviewee is nervous. You give her a reassuring smile and nod affirmatively at each of her answers, hoping to put her at ease. Unfortunately, it turns out that positive feedback does a socially anxious interviewee no favours. In fact, it would be better to turn that smile upside-down.We know this from a new study from North Illinois University where a "careers counsellor" (actually a research assistant) conducted practice interviews w........ Read more »

  • August 19, 2014
  • 04:23 AM
  • 145 views

Family processes and trajectory in autism

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

The paper by Woodman and colleagues [1] looking at trajectory and autism in adolescents and adults is the source material for today's post (another micropost). Concluding that: "Overall, autism symptoms and maladaptive behaviors were observed to improve over the study period" of about 8 years, the authors also reported that "greater improvements were associated with higher levels of maternal praise (based on maternal speech samples) and higher quality mother-child relationships". If I remember c........ Read more »

  • August 18, 2014
  • 05:14 PM
  • 268 views

The 10,000-Hour rule is nonsense

by Richard Kunert in Brain's Idea

Have you heard of Malcom Gladwell’s 10,000-hour rule? The key to success in any field is practice, and not just a little. A new publication in the journal Psychological Science had a good look at all the evidence and concludes that this rule is nonsense. No Einstein in you, I am afraid. The authors of […]... Read more »

  • August 18, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 119 views

Simple Jury Persuasion: When videos are too persuasive…

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

It’s hard to know why research that is a almost a decade old is seen as fodder for a recent Op-Ed in the New York Times, but so it goes. Jennifer Mnookin, a law professor at UCLA, certainly has an impressive resumé, and it is likely most readers of the NYT are not familiar with […]

Related posts:
Simple Jury Persuasion: When a Picture Can Sink Your Case
Simple Jury Persuasion: Being “right” versus being persuasive
Simple Jury Persuasion: Make Your Expert Optimally Persuasive


... Read more »

  • August 18, 2014
  • 04:59 AM
  • 173 views

The simple piece of information that could dramatically increase your muscular endurance

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

How most of us choose to behave is shaped powerfully by the behaviour of others (or, more specifically, our perception of their behaviour). Psychologists call this the influence of "social norms", and its potency has been investigated extensively in the context of environmentally friendly behaviours like recycling, and health behaviours, such as binge drinking and frequency of exercise.What if this same psychological lever could be exploited, not to encourage people to take up more physical acti........ Read more »

  • August 18, 2014
  • 04:10 AM
  • 143 views

ADHD in the prison population: a micropost

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"Compared with published general population prevalence, there is a fivefold increase in prevalence of ADHD in youth prison populations (30.1%) and a 10-fold increase in adult prison populations (26.2%)"."Mianly dry" apparently @ Paul WhiteleyThat was the primary conclusion reached in the meta-analysis by Young and colleagues [1] looking at the collected peer-reviewed literature on "the variable prevalence of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in incarcerated populations".There ........ Read more »

  • August 17, 2014
  • 09:00 PM
  • 194 views

Can psychopathy be treated?

by neurosci in Neuroscientifically Challenged

Some psychological conditions receive a disproportionate amount of attention in popular media relative to how frequently they actually occur in the population. One of those is psychopathy, a personality disorder that is characterized by antisocial behavior, impulsivity, and a lack of empathy. Psychopaths may be charming on the surface but tend towards pathological deception and indifferent manipulation of other people. And they are more likely to have behavioral problems or be involved in crimin........ Read more »

  • August 17, 2014
  • 02:36 PM
  • 173 views

Schizophrenia and the Twilight Zone

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

You are now entering the Twilight Zone. You may remember the television show, with it’s odd twists and turns, but for people with schizophrenia it means something just a little […]... Read more »

  • August 16, 2014
  • 01:00 PM
  • 213 views

Is your Stomach… Controlling your Mind?

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Close the blinds, lock the doors, and find a safe place to hide. Are you alone? No, no you aren’t and you may not even be in control of your […]... Read more »

  • August 16, 2014
  • 03:21 AM
  • 184 views

The epidemiology of autism spectrum disorders

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

A very short post for readers to ponder based on the paper by Amanda Baxter and colleagues [1] who talked about the global epidemiology of the autism spectrum disorders (ASDs)."In 2010 there were an estimated 52 million cases of ASDs, equating to a prevalence of 7.6 per 1000 or one in 132 persons".Aside from emphasising the word 'estimated' (I highlighted that), be prepared to see the Baxter paper and that quote cited quite a bit in the peer-reviewed literature in times to come.----------[1........ Read more »

A. J. Baxter, T. S. Brugha, H. E. Erskine, R. W. Scheurer, T. Vos, & J. G. Scott. (2014) The epidemiology and global burden of autism spectrum disorders. Psychological Medicine. info:/http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/S003329171400172X

  • August 15, 2014
  • 04:46 PM
  • 185 views

Global similarity signals of recognition strength

by Emilie Reas in Emilie Reas - Remember

The below article was recently rejected from the Journal of Neuroscience as a ‘Journal Club’ commentary on Davis et al., 2014, ‘Medial temporal lobe global similarity signals underlie recognition strength’. Hoping that my efforts will not go to waste, I’d like to give the piece an alternate home here. Please read, comment and share, all […]... Read more »

Davis T, Xue G, Love BC, Preston AR, & Poldrack RA. (2014) Global neural pattern similarity as a common basis for categorization and recognition memory. The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience, 34(22), 7472-84. PMID: 24872552  

  • August 15, 2014
  • 03:20 PM
  • 312 views

In Defense of Eating Junk Food in Eating Disorder Treatment

by Shirley in Science of Eating Disorders


Should eating disorder patients be introduced to “junk food” or “hyper-palatable” foods during treatment? A few days ago, I stumbled across a blog post where Dr. Julie O’Toole, Founder and Director of the Kartini Clinic for Disordered Eating, argues against introducing “junk food” during ED treatment. The crux of the argument is that “hyperpalatable foods”—e.g., chips and Cheetos—are not real food and should never be forced or encouraged for anyone, regard........ Read more »

  • August 15, 2014
  • 01:29 PM
  • 203 views

Swamp Thing and Plant Communication

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Maybe I’m dating myself here, but ever see the swamp thing movie, television show, or even the comic? Call me picky, after all we are talking about a human/plant hybrid, but he never needed to talk. I know, some of you are probably rolling your eyes at me given it’s a comic, movie or tv show [depending on your level of geek], but come on, this is science![…]... Read more »

G. Kim,, M. L. LeBlanc,, E. K. Wafula,, C. W. dePamphilis,, & J. H. Westwood. (2014) Genomic-scale exchange of mRNA between a parasitic plant and its hosts. Science. info:/10.1126/science.1253122

  • August 15, 2014
  • 08:35 AM
  • 234 views

The Friday Five 8/15/2014

by Bill Sullivan in The 'Scope

An amusing look at 5 of the hottest science news stories this week... Read more »

Rechavi, O., Houri-Ze’evi, L., Anava, S., Goh, W., Kerk, S., Hannon, G., & Hobert, O. (2014) Starvation-Induced Transgenerational Inheritance of Small RNAs in C. elegans. Cell, 158(2), 277-287. DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2014.06.020  

Yang B, Treweek JB, Kulkarni RP, Deverman BE, Chen CK, Lubeck E, Shah S, Cai L, & Gradinaru V. (2014) Single-Cell Phenotyping within Transparent Intact Tissue through Whole-Body Clearing. Cell. PMID: 25088144  

Hsu, D., Huang, L., Nordgren, L., Rucker, D., & Galinsky, A. (2014) The Music of Power: Perceptual and Behavioral Consequences of Powerful Music. Social Psychological and Personality Science. DOI: 10.1177/1948550614542345  

  • August 15, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 167 views

Did you hear the one about older adults being targeted for fraud?

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

Of course you did. But you may want to take a look at this study because, maybe, it isn’t true after all. It certainly is a well-known myth if it is not true. This appears to be one of those situations where we add up what we know and then come up with a conclusion […]

Related posts:
When it comes to corporate fraud in America, men are almost always to blame
Is it true that older jurors are more likely to convict?
Birthers, deathers, and did you hear about Jimmy Hoffa?


... Read more »

Ross, M, Grossman, I, & Schryer, E. (2014) Contrary to psychological and popular opinion, there is no compelling evidence that older adults are disproportionately victimized by consumer fraud. . Perspectives on Psychological Science. info:/

  • August 15, 2014
  • 05:19 AM
  • 116 views

We're happier when we chat to strangers, but our instinct is to ignore them

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

It's become a truism that humans are "social animals". And yet, you've probably noticed - people on public transport or in waiting rooms seem to do everything they can not to interact. On the London tube there's an unwritten rule not to even look at one another. This is the paradox explored by Nicholas Epley and Juliana Schroeder in a series of nine new studies involving members of the public on trains, planes, in taxis and a waiting room.The investigation began with rail and bus commuters ........ Read more »

Epley N, & Schroeder J. (2014) Mistakenly Seeking Solitude. Journal of experimental psychology. General. PMID: 25019381  

  • August 15, 2014
  • 04:07 AM
  • 175 views

Psychotic experience following childhood neurodevelopmental diagnosis

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

The paper by Golam Khandaker and colleagues [1] suggesting a higher risk of psychotic episodes (PEs) in early adolescence among those with a diagnosed childhood neurodevelopmental disorder (ND) makes for some interesting reading. Detailing several diagnoses as falling under the banner of neurodevelopmental disorder (autism spectrum, dyslexia, dyspraxia, dysgraphia, dysorthographia, dyscalculia), researchers concluded that: "The risk of PEs was higher in those with, compared with those witho........ Read more »

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