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  • July 3, 2014
  • 11:25 PM
  • 177 views

Bass lays down the beat

by Shelly Fan in Neurorexia

Image: Fender Jazz Bass Try tapping your finger to a song – any song. Are you focusing on the melodious vocals, or the strong pulsating beat...... Read more »

  • July 3, 2014
  • 06:20 PM
  • 35 views

Igniting Sparks, Surviving Fireworks and Dog Science July!

by Cobb & Hecht in Do You Believe In Dog?

Hey Julie, well, here I am, back in chilly, wintry Melbourne. #SPARCS2014 was an amazing event - such an intense three days with early feedback suggesting over 40,000 people joined in online for canine science, excitement, wonderful researchers and inspiration!  You've done a great job capturing the essence and feedback of this international conference over at DogSpies on the Scientific American Blog Network. I'm so pleased someone took photos, or I think I would have convinc........ Read more »

  • July 3, 2014
  • 01:00 PM
  • 171 views

Why you Should Not Fear Testosterone Therapy

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Testosterone, to some it’s a bad word, bringing crazy images like “roid rage” and the like. To others with more than just a pop culture understanding it is a lifesaver. […]... Read more »

  • July 2, 2014
  • 09:03 AM
  • 184 views

Chimps stick grass in their ears to be cool: notes on cultural transmission

by Neuroecology in Neuroecology

1. In 2010, a female chimpanzee named Julie began repeatedly stuffing a stiff blade of grass into her ear. This Grass-in-ear behavior has affectionately been dubbed “GIEB” by the scientists who observed it.... Read more »

Huffman, M., Nahallage, C., & Leca, J. (2008) Cultured Monkeys: Social Learning Cast in Stones. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 17(6), 410-414. DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-8721.2008.00616.x  

Stocker R, Green DG, & Newth D. (2001) Consensus and cohesion in simulated social networks. Journal of Artificial Societies and Social Simulation, 4(4). info:/

Rendell L, Fogarty L, Hoppitt WJ, Morgan TJ, Webster MM, & Laland KN. (2011) Cognitive culture: theoretical and empirical insights into social learning strategies. Trends in cognitive sciences, 15(2), 68-76. PMID: 21215677  

  • July 2, 2014
  • 08:09 AM
  • 171 views

What happens to the cool kids when they grow up?

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

"Cool kids", according to a new study, are those early teens (aged 13 to 15) who want to be popular, and try to impress their peers by acting older than their years. They have precocious romantic relationships, commit relatively minor acts of bad behaviour (such as sneaking into the cinema without paying), and surround themselves with good-looking friends. These teenagers attract respect from their peers at first, but what's the story by the time they reach early adulthood?Joseph Allen and his c........ Read more »

  • July 2, 2014
  • 06:53 AM
  • 121 views

Understanding the personalities in your workforce - the psychology of assessment

by David Lurie in People Agenda

Understanding the personalities in your workforce - the psychology of assessment ... Read more »

  • July 2, 2014
  • 03:40 AM
  • 134 views

Quality of life and autism

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

The BBC ran an interesting article on their website recently titled: Happiness and disability. Discussions about the disability paradox - whereby some people with often significant and persistent disability report experiencing a good or excellent quality of life (QoL) - got me thinking about QoL and in particular, how it might relate to the very wide and very heterogeneous autism spectrum. I might add that I am not insinuating that everyone diagnosed on the autism spectrum are 'disabled' but rat........ Read more »

  • July 1, 2014
  • 01:18 PM
  • 168 views

St. Johns Wart and the Dangers of “Alternative” Medicine

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Grapefruit juice, I hate the stuff. But did you know that if you drink as little as 8 oz. of it when you take certain medications it could dramatically increase […]... Read more »

Davis SA, Feldman SR, & Taylor SL. (2014) Use of St. John's Wort in Potentially Dangerous Combinations. Journal of alternative and complementary medicine (New York, N.Y.). PMID: 24956073  

Bailey, D., Malcolm, J., Arnold, O., & David Spence, J. (2002) Grapefruit juice-drug interactions. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, 46(2), 101-110. DOI: 10.1046/j.1365-2125.1998.00764.x  

  • July 1, 2014
  • 01:18 PM
  • 113 views

St. Johns Wort and the Dangers of “Alternative” Medicine

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Grapefruit juice, I hate the stuff. But did you know that if you drink as little as 8 oz. of it when you take certain medications it could dramatically increase […]... Read more »

Davis SA, Feldman SR, & Taylor SL. (2014) Use of St. John's Wort in Potentially Dangerous Combinations. Journal of alternative and complementary medicine (New York, N.Y.). PMID: 24956073  

Bailey, D., Malcolm, J., Arnold, O., & David Spence, J. (2002) Grapefruit juice-drug interactions. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, 46(2), 101-110. DOI: 10.1046/j.1365-2125.1998.00764.x  

  • July 1, 2014
  • 12:18 PM
  • 106 views

When work conditions are tough, Machiavellians thrive

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

When budgets are cut or time is short, watch out for those who excel at work. Their contribution could be admirable, but a new study suggests you may alternatively be witnessing a “Machiavellian” in action – someone exploiting the situation for their own interests.Daniel Kuyumcu and Jason Dahling assessed the Machiavellianism of 110 psychology students, all of whom worked at least 15 hours part-time. Questionnaire items included: "I am willing to sabotage the efforts of other people if the........ Read more »

  • July 1, 2014
  • 04:48 AM
  • 133 views

Mercury exposure and autism or ADHD meta-analysed

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

The paper by Yoshimasu and colleagues [1] is the talking point today, and their assertion following meta-analysis that: "Moderate adverse effects were observed only between environmental inorganic or organic mercury exposures and ASD/ADHD".Eruption... @ Wikipedia For clarity, ASD means autism spectrum disorder and ADHD refers to attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. Inorganic and organic mercury refer to some of the different forms of mercury. Meta-analysis, as I've said befor........ Read more »

  • July 1, 2014
  • 04:19 AM
  • 113 views

With climate change, uncertainty is no-one’s friend

by Andy Extance in Simple Climate

Heard people say climate science is uncertain? Research by psychologist Stephan Lewandowsky from the University of Bristol and his colleagues finds this is more, not less, reason to fight global warming. ... Read more »

  • July 1, 2014
  • 01:56 AM
  • 131 views

Heroes and Villains: Banal or Special People? Part 1 of 2

by Scott McGreal in Eye on Psych

Situationists have claimed that heroism and evil are equally "banal", i.e. people choose between good and evil mainly due to situational pressures rather than their personal traits. However, the situationist analysis is inconsistent. Evil is attributed to external forces, whereas heroism results from character. ... Read more »

  • June 30, 2014
  • 04:03 PM
  • 103 views

Exploding the 10,000 hours myth - it's no guarantee for greatness

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

Swedish psychologist K. Anders Ericsson has studied elite performers in music, chess and sport for decades, and he says the main distinguishing characteristic of experts is the amount of deliberate practice they've invested - typically over 10,000 hours.This is painstaking practice performed for the sole purpose of improving one's skill level. Best-selling authors like Gladwell, Daniel Pink, Matthew Syed and others, have taken Ericsson's results and distilled them into the uplifting message that........ Read more »

Hambrick, D., Oswald, F., Altmann, E., Meinz, E., Gobet, F., & Campitelli, G. (2014) Deliberate practice: Is that all it takes to become an expert?. Intelligence, 34-45. DOI: 10.1016/j.intell.2013.04.001  

  • June 30, 2014
  • 04:37 AM
  • 129 views

AAP policy statement on iodine deficiency and pollutants

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

The quite recent policy statement from the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) drafted by Rogan and colleagues [1] is the source for today's short(ish) post. Highlighting a growing concern on the issue of iodine deficiency in women of reproductive age, the policy document also raises awareness of "commonly encountered environmental chemicals" potentially exacerbating such deficiency, and in particular "thiocyanate, nitrate and perchlorate". These chemicals are specifically mentioned because of ........ Read more »

  • June 29, 2014
  • 01:12 PM
  • 156 views

Science Fiction vs. Fact: Zombies

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Zombies, those brain loving little guys [and girls] are everywhere. From shows like The Walking Dead – a zombie show where they call them anything but zombies– to video games, music videos, […]... Read more »

Lafferty KD. (2006) Can the common brain parasite, Toxoplasma gondii, influence human culture?. Proceedings. Biological sciences / The Royal Society, 273(1602), 2749-55. PMID: 17015323  

Vyas A, Kim SK, Giacomini N, Boothroyd JC, & Sapolsky RM. (2007) Behavioral changes induced by Toxoplasma infection of rodents are highly specific to aversion of cat odors. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 104(15), 6442-7. PMID: 17404235  

Thomas, F., Schmidt-Rhaesa, A., Martin, G., Manu, C., Durand, P., & Renaud, F. (2002) Do hairworms (Nematomorpha) manipulate the water seeking behaviour of their terrestrial hosts?. Journal of Evolutionary Biology, 15(3), 356-361. DOI: 10.1046/j.1420-9101.2002.00410.x  

W. Wesołowska T. Wesołowski. (2014) Do Leucochloridium sporocysts manipulate the behaviour of their snail hosts?. Journal of Zoology , 292(3), 151-155. info:/10.1111/jzo.12094

  • June 29, 2014
  • 07:39 AM
  • 140 views

A gluten-free diet for asymptomatic patients with coeliac disease

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

The tip of the iceberg? @ Wikipedia Today I'd like to focus on the paper by Kalle Kurppa and colleagues [1] and their suggestion that: "GFDs [gluten-free diets] benefit asymptomatic EMA-positive [endomysial antibody] patients" with coeliac (celiac) disease in mind.Asymptomatic, when it comes to a condition like coeliac disease (CD) - an autoimmune condition linked to the consumption of gluten - is not necessarily all that surprising given the numbers of cases w........ Read more »

Kurppa K, Paavola A, Collin P, Sievänen H, Laurila K, Huhtala H, Päivi Saavalainen, Mäki M, & Kaukinen K. (2014) Benefits of a Gluten-free diet for Asymptomatic Patients with Serologic Markers of Celiac Disease. Gastroenterology. PMID: 24837306  

  • June 29, 2014
  • 06:36 AM
  • 162 views

Another Education Neuromyth Debunked

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

What does neuroscience have to say about the educational value of lectures? Not much, says pedagogist Ken Masters in a lively article just published in Medical Teacher: Nipping an education myth in the bud: Poh’s brain activity during lectures Masters lays into an emerging slice of neurononsense. The claim is that neuroscientists have shown that, […]The post Another Education Neuromyth Debunked appeared first on Neuroskeptic.... Read more »

  • June 28, 2014
  • 03:25 AM
  • 126 views

On parental inflammatory bowel disease and offspring autism risk

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

The paper by Ane Birgitte Telén Andersen and colleagues [1] (open-access here) concluding "no evidence of an increased risk of ASD [autism spectrum disorders] among children born to parents with IBD [inflammatory bowel disease]" caught my eye recently.Qays and Layla @ Wikipedia Based on an analysis of one of those Danish Registries which seem to be providing all-manner of important correlations and non-correlations, the authors looked for the presence of parental IBDs such a........ Read more »

  • June 27, 2014
  • 12:00 PM
  • 111 views

THE FUTURE OF FOOD?

by Lucy Gee in Antisense Science

In the world food has always been a necessity, but for most it represents a ritual, a pleasure, our culture. For many of us it’s synonymous with celebration and often associated with some of the happier moments in our lives – but do we need it? One man, Rob Rhinehart has embarked on a new life, without the need for solid food. He has created a product named Soylent (I know what you’re thinking, like that sci-fi book right? We’ve all heard of Soylent Green), which is an en........ Read more »

Epstein LH, Carr KA, Cavanaugh MD, Paluch RA, & Bouton ME. (2011) Long-term habituation to food in obese and nonobese women. The American journal of clinical nutrition, 94(2), 371-6. PMID: 21593492  

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