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  • April 14, 2014
  • 10:24 AM
  • 199 views

Some exploratory evidence that wait-list conditions may act as a nocebo in psychotherapy trials

by Kristoffer Magnusson in R Psychologist

The hypothesis that wait-lists could be nocebo conditions was investigated by Furukawa et al (2014). The authors performed a network meta-analysis of 49 RCT that involved cognitive-behaviour therapy for depression. ... Read more »

Furukawa TA, Noma H, Caldwell DM, Honyashiki M, Shinohara K, Imai H, Chen P, Hunot V, & Churchill R. (2014) Waiting list may be a nocebo condition in psychotherapy trials: a contribution from network meta-analysis. Acta psychiatrica Scandinavica. PMID: 24697518  

  • April 14, 2014
  • 09:12 AM
  • 183 views

Why Humanistic Psychology is Still Relevant

by Jeremiah Stanghini in Jeremiah Stanghini

The development of humanistic psychology began in the late 1950s and was ‘born‘ in the early 1960s. Given the time that humanistic psychology grew, there’s no doubt that it informed the civil rights movement. However, some say that humanistic psychology peaked in the 1970s. An … Continue reading →... Read more »

DeRobertis, E. M. (2013) Humanistic Psychology: Alive in the 21st Century?. Journal of Humanistic Psychology, 53(4), 419-437. DOI: 10.1177/0022167812473369  

  • April 14, 2014
  • 09:00 AM
  • 153 views

Idealistic Thinking Linked With Economic Slump

by amikulak in Daily Observations

Envisioning a bright future should pave the way for success, right? Maybe not. Research suggests that thinking about an idealized future may actually be linked with economic downturn, not upswing. […]... Read more »

  • April 14, 2014
  • 09:00 AM
  • 697 views

How practicing compassion alters the brain

by Katharine Blackwell in Contemplating Cognition

As tempting as it is to hope that one meditation practice could be a panacea within the mind – meditate, and become more mindful! improve your attention! cure your depression! notice when those around you need help! – I have to admit that I know the brain doesn’t work this way. The skills you practice are the skills you strengthen, and compassion in particular is a skill that requires more than just a general awareness of your environment.... Read more »

Weng HY, Fox AS, Shackman AJ, Stodola DE, Caldwell JZ, Olson MC, Rogers GM, & Davidson RJ. (2013) Compassion training alters altruism and neural responses to suffering. Psychological science, 24(7), 1171-1180. PMID: 23696200  

  • April 14, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 192 views

A new neurolaw caveat to minimize punishment

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Just say his brain made him do it! That is the conclusion of new research on the relationship between gruesomeness of the crime and the harshness of the sentence. In case you can’t intuit this one, the more gruesome (and disturbing) the crime, the harsher the sentence tends to be. But if the assault was […]

Related posts:
Neurolaw Update: Who’s in charge here—me or my brain?
When identifying punishment—will jurors focus on intent or outcome?
Simple Jury Persuasion: Anger + Disgust........ Read more »

  • April 14, 2014
  • 04:16 AM
  • 28 views

Does Psychology have its own vocabulary?

by Christian Jarrett in BPS Research Digest

If you were to pick up the flagship journal from a discipline that is foreign to you and flip to an article at random, how much do you think you would understand? Put a different way: how much of the vocabulary employed in that article might you misinterpret?The vocabularies used by any given discipline overlap with those of many other disciplines, although the specific meaning associated with a given term may be dissimilar from discipline to discipline. Anglophone psychology, for instance, has ........ Read more »

  • April 14, 2014
  • 03:58 AM
  • 175 views

Neurology of inflammatory bowel diseases

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

The paper by Ben-Or and colleagues [1] talking about a neurologic profile present in a small participant cohort of children and adolescents diagnosed with an inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) caught my eye recently. Their findings reporting that over two-thirds of their paediatric participant group diagnosed with IBD also "exhibited neurologic manifestations" provides some compelling preliminary evidence for further investigation in this area.Outside of reports of headache and dizziness, the pres........ Read more »

  • April 12, 2014
  • 11:54 PM
  • 215 views

Early brain development and heat shock proteins

by neurosci in Neuroscientifically Challenged

The brain development of a fetus is really an amazing thing. The first sign of an incipient nervous system emerges during the third week of development; it is simply a thickened layer of tissue called the neural plate. After about 5 more days, the neural plate has formed an indentation called the neural groove, and the sides of the neural groove have curled up and begun to fuse together (see pic to the right). This will form the neural tube, which will eventually become the brain and spinal cord........ Read more »

  • April 11, 2014
  • 06:25 PM
  • 249 views

Dad's obesity and risk of offspring autism

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

In this post I'm talking about the paper by Pål Surén and colleagues [1] and their suggestion that "paternal obesity is an independent risk factor for ASDs [autism spectrum disorders] in children". I do so not with the intent of stigmatising parents and specifically parents with weight issues, which tend to be present for many more reasons than just food and exercise (see here), but merely to highlight how parental physical health may show some relationship to offspring cog........ Read more »

Suren, P., Gunnes, N., Roth, C., Bresnahan, M., Hornig, M., Hirtz, D., Lie, K., Lipkin, W., Magnus, P., Reichborn-Kjennerud, T.... (2014) Parental Obesity and Risk of Autism Spectrum Disorder. PEDIATRICS. DOI: 10.1542/peds.2013-3664  

  • April 11, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 204 views

Smiling and credibility: Is it different for male and female witnesses at trial?

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

Women smile more than men. Men are typically seen as more credible than women. So these researchers decided to see if there was a relationship between smiling and assessments of credibility on actual witnesses in the courtroom.  The researchers used the Witness Credibility Scale to assess actual witnesses overall credibility. They thought that if smiling […]

Related posts:
Women as Expert Witnesses: The good, the sad, and the ugly
Which is the more moral negotiator? The male or the femal........ Read more »

  • April 11, 2014
  • 04:00 AM
  • 30 views

Facial expressions as social camouflage

by Christian Jarrett in BPS Research Digest

Can making faces mask your personality?According to a group of University of Glasgow psychologists, Daniel Gill and colleagues, it can. Writing in the journal Psychological Science, these researchers say that human facial expressions can signal how dominant, trustworthy, or attractive we are – and that these ‘dynamic’ signals can mask or override the impression given off by the ‘static’ structure of the face.In other words, someone might have a face that ‘seems untrustworthy’, but ........ Read more »

  • April 11, 2014
  • 03:48 AM
  • 331 views

Brain Scans: Don’t Throw Out The Baby With The Dead Salmon

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

Is neuro-skepticism in danger of going too far? Is it time to take a critical look at critiques of neuroscience? Martha Farah of the University of Pennsylvania says yes, in a Hastings Center Report just published: Brain Images, Babies, and Bathwater: Critiquing Critiques of Functional Neuroimaging Farah covers a broad spectrum of criticisms, ranging from […]The post Brain Scans: Don’t Throw Out The Baby With The Dead Salmon appeared first on Neuroskeptic.... Read more »

  • April 10, 2014
  • 11:18 AM
  • 159 views

Why do dogs lick people?

by Cobb & Hecht in Do You Believe In Dog?

Just Wow. Photo: Chris Sembrot PhotographyHi Julie,Yes, but WHY? I loved Claudia Fugazza's guest post about drawing on dogs' social imitation capacities to learn as copy-cats in the Do as I do training technique. Good stuff! A few things collided this week that resulted in me deciding to look into why dogs lick people. The first was the Huffington Post 'This Is What Happens When You Ask People To Kiss Their Dogs In Front Of A Camera' (example above from Chris Sembrot's 'For the love o........ Read more »

Bradshaw John W.S., Blackwell Emily J., & Casey Rachel A. (2009) Dominance in domestic dogs—useful construct or bad habit?. Journal of Veterinary Behavior: Clinical Applications and Research, 4(3), 135-144. DOI: 10.1016/j.jveb.2008.08.004  

  • April 10, 2014
  • 03:56 AM
  • 201 views

Gluten exposure and "feelings of depression"?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Could exposure to dietary gluten affect a person's moods or emotional state?Well, if the paper by Simone Peters and colleagues [1] (open-access here) is to be believed the answer may very well be yes, at least in some cases, as they report a link between gluten consumption and feelings of depression under [short-term] experimental conditions. If replicated, such a finding may have profound consequences for how we view our relationship between food and mental health and wellbeing.Bread Ma'am?&nbs........ Read more »

  • April 10, 2014
  • 12:29 AM
  • 221 views

Atheists and Their Capacity for Awe at Life

by Scott McGreal in Eye on Psych

Many people think of awe as a particularly religious emotion and therefore seem to assume that people with no religious beliefs at all, e.g. atheists are closed to the experience of awe. This assumption is quite false and reflects a wider prejudice against atheists. Research has shown that people who reject supernatural beliefs actually are capable of experiencing a sense of awe. In fact, the experience of awe may be particularly beneficial for those who do not believe in an afterlife.... Read more »

  • April 9, 2014
  • 08:45 PM
  • 239 views

Why do I procrastinate? I'll figure it out later

by neurosci in Neuroscientifically Challenged

If you are a chronic procrastinator, you're not alone. Habitual procrastination plagues around 15-20% of adults and 50% of college students. And, depending on the nature of the responsibilities one is neglecting, procrastination can have consequences. In a chronic procrastinator, repeated failure to efficiently complete important tasks can lead to lower feelings of self-worth. In certain contexts, it can also result in very tangible penalties. For example, a survey in 2002 found that 29% of Amer........ Read more »

  • April 9, 2014
  • 11:18 AM
  • 267 views

Telomere length: a new measure of chronic stress in wildlife? | @GrrlScientist

by GrrlScientist in GrrlScientist

Telomeres, the DNA-protein caps that prevent chromosomal fraying, are positively affected by social stress, according to two independent studies that were just published within days of each other. One study -- which has received widespread media coverage -- found a positive relationship between social environment and telomere length in children, adding support to previous work in people. A second study -- which few have heard about -- found that accelerated telomere erosion is associated with so........ Read more »

Shalev Idan, Entringer Sonja, Wadhwa Pathik D., Wolkowitz Owen M., Puterman Eli, Lin Jue, & Epel Elissa S. (2013) Stress and telomere biology: A lifespan perspective. Psychoneuroendocrinology, 38(9), 1835-1842. DOI: 10.1016/j.psyneuen.2013.03.010  

  • April 9, 2014
  • 10:36 AM
  • 208 views

Did You Hear That? Specific Brain Activity Linked With Imagined Hearing

by amikulak in Daily Observations

Being able to distinguish what is real and what is not may seem pretty basic, but the inability to perform this task could be a marker of many psychiatric disorders. […]... Read more »

Sugimori, E., Mitchell, K., Raye, C., Greene, E., & Johnson, M. (2014) Brain Mechanisms Underlying Reality Monitoring for Heard and Imagined Words. Psychological Science, 25(2), 403-413. DOI: 10.1177/0956797613505776  

  • April 9, 2014
  • 09:30 AM
  • 81 views

People That Think Social Media Helps Their Work Are Probably Wrong

by Richard Landers in NeoAcademic

In an upcoming special issue of Social Science Computer Review, Landers and Callan[1] set out to understand how people actually use social media while at work and how it affects their job performance.  By polling workers across a wide variety of jobs (across at least 17 industries), they identified 8 broad ways that people use social […]Related articles from NeoAcademic:Textual Harassment at Work: Romance and Sexual Harassment on Social MediaGamification, Social Media, Mobile, and MTurk ........ Read more »

  • April 9, 2014
  • 08:51 AM
  • 101 views

Ignoring and Excluding Others: The Personal Consequences of Ostracizing in the [Legal] Workplace

by Dan DeFoe in Psycholawlogy

Targets of ostracism experience psychological, physiological, and behavioral consequences when another person, known as a “source”, ignores and excludes them. These consequences can occur at home, at school, or the workplace, and have profound, e.g. depression, effects on health and well-being.  Researchers have established that ostracism occurs very frequently.  One study documented it occurring [...]
The post Ignoring and Excluding Others: The Personal Consequences of Ostracizin........ Read more »

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