Post List

Psychology posts

(Modify Search »)

  • December 29, 2014
  • 11:00 PM
  • 187 views

Inference Calls in Text

by Joshua Fisher in Text Savvy

Britton and Gülgöz (1991) conducted a study to test whether removing "inference calls" from text would improve retention of the material. Inference calls are locations in text that demand inference from the reader. One simple example from the text used in the study is below:... Read more »

  • December 29, 2014
  • 01:11 PM
  • 234 views

Smartphone Apps for the Treatment of Eating Disorders

by Tetyana in Science of Eating Disorders

As of January 2014, over 50% of adults in the United States own a smartphone; unsurprisingly, there has been a growth in the number of mobile applications (apps) aimed at providing health care services for various mental (and physical) health problems, including eating disorders. The purpose of mobile health technologies is to utilize the functionality of smartphones to deliver a wide range of health services, including providing psychoeducation, treatment services and/or recovery support.
... Read more »

Juarascio AS, Manasse SM, Goldstein SP, Forman EM, & Butryn ML. (2014) Review of Smartphone Applications for the Treatment of Eating Disorders. European eating disorders review : the journal of the Eating Disorders Association. PMID: 25303148  

  • December 29, 2014
  • 05:48 AM
  • 178 views

Very long chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) deficiency and autism?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

I started this blogging year (2014) with a post talking about the need for further research consideration for a possible role of inborn errors of metabolism in relation to the presentation of at least some autism (see here). It is therefore timely that I (almost) end this year's blogging odyssey with reference to the paper by Amy Brown and colleagues [1] and their suggestion that although: "VLCAD deficiency does not have a significant impact on cognitive or motor skills" there may still be merit........ Read more »

  • December 28, 2014
  • 02:12 PM
  • 250 views

Insights into the scientific gatekeepers: A fight for the status quo?

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

A new study has found that well respected peer reviewed journals have rejected manuscripts that could discuss outstanding or breakthrough work. The researchers found that some manuscripts rejected by three leading medical journals went on to receive a large number of citations after publication in other journals. The study, which if course was peer reviewed itself, offered insight into the process that the typical researcher might not see.... Read more »

Siler K, Lee K, & Bero L. (2014) Measuring the effectiveness of scientific gatekeeping. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. PMID: 25535380  

  • December 28, 2014
  • 04:34 AM
  • 187 views

Pre-eclampsia exposure and autism

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

A few weeks back, the paper from Cheryl Walker and colleagues [1] reporting that: "Children with ASD [autism spectrum disorder] were twice as likely to have been exposed in utero to preeclampsia as controls with TD [typical development]" provided some column inches in certain media quarters.How dare you insult Hero's Duty, you little guttersnipe!Although not the first time that pre-eclampsia - a hypertensive state characterised by proteinuria occurring during pregnancy and potentially ........ Read more »

  • December 27, 2014
  • 03:52 AM
  • 188 views

Late/moderately preterm kids at risk for a positive autism screen

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

If you're sick of the sight of tinsel and/or turkey (delete as appropriate), I promise no more mention of them in this post. Just a brief introduction to the the paper by Alexa Guy and colleagues [1] (open-access) who concluded that: "LMPT [late and moderately preterm] infants are at significantly increased risk for positive autistic screen."Megamind, incredibly handsome criminal genius and master of all villainy!Based on the [final] analysis of data from some 600 LMPT infant and 760 t........ Read more »

  • December 26, 2014
  • 09:00 AM
  • 225 views

The Chosen Ones

by Rodney Steadman in Gravity's Pull

Recent research out of the University of Nevada shows that choice in exercise order increases motivation.... Read more »

  • December 26, 2014
  • 05:10 AM
  • 346 views

The Science of Addiction: How Drugs Affect the Brain

by Imtiaz Ibne Alam in Medical-Reference - A Pioneer in Medical Blogging

For centuries, the theory behind drug addiction was labored in the fogs of awkward myths and misconceptions. Drug abusers were then depicted as individuals with lack of morality and willpower, not as patients with a chronic brain disease.... Read more »

  • December 24, 2014
  • 04:43 AM
  • 217 views

Gluten-free diet affecting EEG findings?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Acknowledging that a certain 'jolly' person with a beard wearing a red suit will be visiting a few homes across the globe quite soon (the only time of the year that most people would let a stranger enter their home via a chimney) I want to briefly direct your attention to the paper by Parisi and colleagues [1] talking about how in "the presence of unexplained EEG abnormalities and/or other neurological disorders/SDB [sleep disordered breathing] an atypical or silent CD [coeliac di........ Read more »

  • December 23, 2014
  • 02:15 PM
  • 270 views

The science of dietary restriction and it’s benefits (or what to do after the holidays)

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

In a new study, researchers have identified a key molecular mechanism behind the health benefits of dietary restriction — or reduced food intake without malnutrition. Also known as calorie restriction or simply a diet, dietary restriction is best known for its ability to slow aging in laboratory animals. The findings here show that restricting two amino acids, methionine and cysteine, results in increased hydrogen sulfide (H2S) production and protection against ischemia reperfusion injury, or ........ Read more »

Hine, C., Harputlugil, E., Zhang, Y., Ruckenstuhl, C., Lee, B., Brace, L., Longchamp, A., Treviño-Villarreal, J., Mejia, P., Ozaki, C.... (2014) Endogenous Hydrogen Sulfide Production Is Essential for Dietary Restriction Benefits. Cell. DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2014.11.048  

  • December 23, 2014
  • 01:10 PM
  • 300 views

Know your brain: Ventral tegmental area

by neurosci in Neuroscientifically Challenged

Where is the ventral tegmental area?











Ventral tegmental area along with other structures in the brain connected by dopamine pathways.






The ventral tegmental area, or VTA, is in the midbrain, situated adjacent to the substantia nigra. Although it contains several different types of neurons, it is primarily characterized by its dopaminergic neurons, which project from the VTA throughout the brain. The VTA is considered an integral part of a........ Read more »

  • December 23, 2014
  • 05:26 AM
  • 215 views

The bipolar - schizoaffective - schizophrenia spectrum?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"This pattern of results is consistent with the conceptualisation of a spectrum of disorders, ranging from BDP [bipolar disorder] at one end, to SAD [schizoaffective disorder] in the middle, and SCZ [schizophrenia] at the other end." So concluded the paper by Serafino Mancuso and colleagues [1] examining clinical data derived from the Australian Survey of High Impact Psychosis (SHIP).The thing about perfection is that it's unknowable.I'm not going to dwell too ........ Read more »

  • December 22, 2014
  • 02:42 PM
  • 123 views

Everyone is attracted to creativity. But which creative acts are the sexiest?

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

Who finds Bill Gates' creativity sexy?By guest blogger Sam McNerneyEver since the Sirens seduced Odyssey’s crew, Sophocles entertained ancient Athens, and our Paleolithic ancestors decorated cave walls in Lascaux, individuals have been drawn to acts of creativity. Today, the allure of creativity is all the more apparent. After Tim Berners-Lee created the World Wide Web in 1991, we’ve witnessed a proliferation of creative expression on YouTube channels, blogs, and even Twitter. Given the........ Read more »

  • December 22, 2014
  • 06:25 AM
  • 237 views

Statistics Show: Males Do More Stupid Things Than Women

by Chiara Civardi in United Academics

There’s one prestigious honor, the Darwin Award, which is given to people that helped improving the human gene pool. However, nobody is really keen on receiving this noble recognition: Darwin Award winners eliminate themselves (or anyway lose their reproductive abilities) in such stupid ways that ensure there’s an idiot less on Earth.... Read more »

Lendrem BA, Lendrem DW, Gray A, & Isaacs JD. (2014) The Darwin Awards: sex differences in idiotic behaviour. BMJ (Clinical research ed.). PMID: 25500113  

  • December 22, 2014
  • 05:48 AM
  • 223 views

Cytokines activating the kynurenine pathway in schizophrenia?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

I'm a bit of a fan of tryptophan biochemistry on this blog. This quite remarkable aromatic amino acid and it's off-shoot metabolites, which appear to have no end of biological uses, have taken quite a bit of my blogging time down the years. Most recently was the suggestion that a metabolite slotting in between serotonin (5-HT) and melatonin might require quite a bit more investigation when it comes to at least some cases of autism (see here).See ya later, President Fartfeathers.The findings repo........ Read more »

  • December 22, 2014
  • 01:57 AM
  • 274 views

Many people are not completely sure about their math ability

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

Main Point:

Many people are unaware of their mathematics-related abilities, and these abilities have to be considered in their evaluations and life outcomes.

Published in:

Journal of Personal and Social Psychology

Study Further:

Mathematics is one of the most disliked subjects of students. It is probably due to its logical dealing with the quantity, shape, and arrangements, but interesting part of the life is that many people have no clue about their mathematics-related abilities,........ Read more »

  • December 22, 2014
  • 12:32 AM
  • 243 views

Go to Bed Early and Cure Your Negative Ruminations!

by The Neurocritic in The Neurocritic

Source: Alyssa L. Miller, Flickr.For nearly 9 years, this blog has been harping on the blight of overblown press releases, with posts like:Irresponsible Press Release Gives False Hope to People With Tourette's, OCD, and SchizophreniaPress Release: Press Releases Are PrestidigitationNew research provides fresh evidence that bogus press releases may depend largely on our biological make-upSave Us From Misleading Press Releasesetc.So it was heartening to see a team of UK researchers formally evalua........ Read more »

  • December 21, 2014
  • 03:51 AM
  • 194 views

Vitamin D for autism... a double-take?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Yes, I know. Another post on the 'day of rest' but I promise you that this will not become a habit. The reason: the paper by Feiyong Jia and colleagues [1] published in the premier journal Pediatrics. The authors describe a case report of a young child with autism who is observed to have shown improvement in some of the core symptoms of autism following supplementation with the [sunshine] vitamin/hormone of the hour: vitamin D. Further reporting on the paper can be seen here.Altho........ Read more »

Feiyong Jia, Bing Wang, Ling Shan, Zhida Xu, Wouter G. Staal, & Lin Du. (2014) Core Symptoms of Autism Improved After Vitamin D Supplementation. Pediatrics. info:/doi: 10.1542/peds.2014-2121

  • December 20, 2014
  • 01:46 PM
  • 236 views

Antidepressants and the effects on your unborn child

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Think you know what causes depression? Well unfortunately scientists don’t have the exact answer, surprised? That’s not the only problem, there is an ever growing concern that we live in an over medicated society and a newly released study doesn’t paint a better picture. About 15 percent of women in the United States suffer from anxiety disorders and depression during their pregnancies, and many are prescribed antidepressants. However little is known about how early exposure to these medic........ Read more »

Altieri SC, Yang H, O'Brien HJ, Redwine HM, Senturk D, Hensler JG, & Andrews AM. (2014) Perinatal vs. Genetic Programming of Serotonin States Associated with Anxiety. Neuropsychopharmacology. PMID: 25523893  

  • December 20, 2014
  • 07:37 AM
  • 232 views

The Ethics of Joke Science

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

What happens when scientists publish papers that aren't meant to be taken seriously? Is ironic, satirical and joke science all in good fun, or can it be dangerous?



This is the question asked by Drexel University researchers Maryam Ronagh and Lawrence Souder in a new paper is called The Ethics of Ironic Science in Its Search for Spoof.

The British BMJ journal is known for an annual Christmas special issue filled with unusual articles. For example, two years ago they explored the questio... Read more »

Ronagh M, & Souder L. (2014) The Ethics of Ironic Science in Its Search for Spoof. Science and engineering ethics. PMID: 25510233  

join us!

Do you write about peer-reviewed research in your blog? Use ResearchBlogging.org to make it easy for your readers — and others from around the world — to find your serious posts about academic research.

If you don't have a blog, you can still use our site to learn about fascinating developments in cutting-edge research from around the world.

Register Now

Research Blogging is powered by SMG Technology.

To learn more, visit seedmediagroup.com.