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  • January 31, 2016
  • 07:06 AM
  • 105 views

Bad side of selfie and its posting on Instagram

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

Main Point:

Selfie obsession can badly affect the relationship with partner.

Published in:

Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking

Study Further:

“Selfie” is one of the latest things of our era. It is also amusing for many people. In a study, researchers from Florida State University were trying to find the effect and outcomes of selfies and their posting on Instagram. They surveyed 420 Instagram users in the age range of 18 years to 62 years.

Researchers f........ Read more »

  • January 30, 2016
  • 07:47 AM
  • 111 views

Suicide of a person can result in more suicides

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

Main Point:

A person’s suicide can increase the chances of suicide attempt of his or her family member or friend.

Published in:

BMJ Open

Study Further:

Suicide is one of the most harmful things in the life of people left behind. Researchers from the University College London found that people, who have faced the suicide of a family member or friend, have 65% more chances of attempting suicide as compared to those people, who have faced the sudden death of their loved ones du........ Read more »

  • January 30, 2016
  • 04:00 AM
  • 121 views

Autism in phenylketonuria (PKU)

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"Autism has been reported in untreated patients with phenylketonuria."Indeed it has, as the paper by Sameh Khemir and colleagues [1] revisits something of a long known about association whereby the archetypal inborn error of metabolism that is phenylketonuria (PKU) has been linked to the presentation of autism or autistic traits [2].Looking at 18 participants diagnosed with PKU, Khemir et al "report their clinical, biochemical and molecular peculiarities" (authors words not mine) and h........ Read more »

Khemir S, Halayem S, Azzouz H, Siala H, Ferchichi M, Guedria A, Bedoui A, Abdelhak S, Messaoud T, Tebib N.... (2016) Autism in Phenylketonuria Patients: From Clinical Presentation to Molecular Defects. Journal of child neurology. PMID: 26759449  

  • January 29, 2016
  • 11:11 AM
  • 126 views

White light in street gives a feeling of safety

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

Main Point:

Pedestrians feel safer while walking, if the streets are illuminated with white light.

Published in:

Safety Science

Study Further:

Researchers from the University of Granada surveyed 275 pedestrians in “nocturnal urban environment”, i.e. participants of the study were given a test after walking in illuminated streets in a city.

Researchers were trying to know the thoughts of pedestrians about different kinds of public lights on streets, i.e. color of lig........ Read more »

  • January 29, 2016
  • 08:36 AM
  • 140 views

Depression can easily pass down from a mother to her daughter

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

Main Point:

Emotions can easily move down from mother to her daughter, i.e. daughters have more chances of getting from their mother a brain structure that is involved in emotion, especially depression.

Published in:

Journal of Neuroscience

Study Further:

Researchers from University of California – San Francisco (UCSF) studied the brains of 35 families by using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). They found that the corticolimbic system, a structure of the brain circuitry, can........ Read more »

Yamagata, B., Murayama, K., Black, J., Hancock, R., Mimura, M., Yang, T., Reiss, A., & Hoeft, F. (2016) Female-Specific Intergenerational Transmission Patterns of the Human Corticolimbic Circuitry. Journal of Neuroscience, 36(4), 1254-1260. DOI: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.4974-14.2016  

  • January 29, 2016
  • 07:02 AM
  • 120 views

When terrified, liberals end up thinking a lot more like  conservatives

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

It’s a basic tenet of the reptile theory that you want to frighten your jurors to make them vote for your client in deliberation. [The ABA has put out an open-access primer on the reptile theory and you can see that here.] It is also been shown repeatedly that conservatives are more fearful than liberals, […]

Related posts:
The evidence is mounting: The brains of liberals and conservatives differ
Are conservatives happier than liberals? Research says:  No.
Mean-spirited blog comments........ Read more »

  • January 29, 2016
  • 03:54 AM
  • 54 views

How do people with Dark Triad personality traits fare at speed dating?

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

People who score highly in the Dark Triad personality traits – narcissism, psychopathy and Machiavellianism – are vain, selfish, callous and manipulative. They're not the kind of people you want to spend much time with. This raises the obvious question – to put it bluntly, why over evolutionary timescales haven't these people died out? One possibility is that their traits actually confer short-term advantages in the mating game. Dark Triad people are obnoxious once you get to know them, su........ Read more »

Jauk, E., Neubauer, A., Mairunteregger, T., Pemp, S., Sieber, K., & Rauthmann, J. (2016) How Alluring Are Dark Personalities? The Dark Triad and Attractiveness in Speed Dating. European Journal of Personality. DOI: 10.1002/per.2040  

  • January 29, 2016
  • 02:56 AM
  • 129 views

Mortality and autism: comorbidity counts

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

I don't enjoy talking about mortality and autism on this blog but once again I'm drawn to discuss this important topic based on some recent findings published by Diana Schendel and colleagues [1]. I say these are important findings on the basis of how researchers took into account the possible role played by psychiatric and neurological comorbidity occurring alongside autism when it comes to the quite alarming mortality statistics.Drawing on the findings reported in their paper and an interview ........ Read more »

  • January 28, 2016
  • 08:36 AM
  • 134 views

Students from political sciences are, usually, overconfident

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

Main Point:

Students of political sciences show higher level of overconfidence, whereas students from humanities are on the inverse side.

Published in:

PLoS ONE

Study Further:

In a study, researchers from the University of St. Gallen and the University of Zurich in Switzerland surveyed over 700 first-year students. They also asked them to go through various experiments during a session lasting about an hour and a half. In the experiments, there was a simple task of guessing the ye........ Read more »

Schulz, J., & Thöni, C. (2016) Overconfidence and Career Choice. PLOS ONE, 11(1). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0145126  

  • January 28, 2016
  • 06:58 AM
  • 155 views

There are at least 216 foreign words for positive emotional states and concepts that we don't have in English

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

One criticism levelled at positive psychology is that it takes an overly Western-centric view of the lighter side of human experience. Addressing that problem, Tim Lomas at the University of East London has begun a deep investigation into all the non-English words for positive emotions and concepts that don't have a direct translation in English.Publishing his initial findings in the The Journal of Positive Psychology, Lomas' hope is not only that we might learn more about the positive psyc........ Read more »

  • January 28, 2016
  • 02:55 AM
  • 117 views

ICF core sets for autism continued: what do experts think about autism?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Consider this post an extension of a previous discussion thread (see here) continuing the voyage of developing "International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF; and Children and Youth version, ICF(-CY)) Core Sets for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)."This time around it is another paper by Elles de Schipper and colleagues [1] (open-access available here) providing the blogging fodder and specifically the stage two of their four stage project building up those core sets........ Read more »

de Schipper E, Mahdi S, de Vries P, Granlund M, Holtmann M, Karande S, Almodayfer O, Shulman C, Tonge B, Wong VV.... (2016) Functioning and disability in autism spectrum disorder: A worldwide survey of experts. Autism research : official journal of the International Society for Autism Research. PMID: 26749373  

  • January 27, 2016
  • 05:50 PM
  • 134 views

Holding Back: Inhibition

by Joshua Fisher in Text Savvy

I remember years ago being required to write math problems containing unnecessary information so that students would have to choose the information that they needed. But just making kids do something is not the same thing as teaching them something. It is, rather, a total cave to assessment obsession—we just found a way to call assessment "instruction".... Read more »

  • January 27, 2016
  • 05:00 PM
  • 103 views

Getting rid of the Ghost People

by Eva Alisic in Trauma Recovery

Patrick became a child soldier at the age of 13, abducted by Ugandan rebels.

Schultz and Weisaeth (2015) describe his story, his mental health problems, and his treatment, a local cleansing ritual. They conclude that the ritual is safe, effective, and perhaps even more powerful than Western-style therapy. ... Read more »

  • January 27, 2016
  • 02:36 PM
  • 143 views

The music of the mind: throwing light on human consciousness

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

UNSW Australia scientists have shown that complex human brain activity is governed by the same simple universal rule of nature that can explain other phenomena such as the beautiful sound of a finely crafted violin or the spots on a leopard. The UNSW team has identified a link between the distinctive patterns of brain function that occur at rest and the physical structure of people's brains.

... Read more »

  • January 27, 2016
  • 10:43 AM
  • 139 views

21 Study Tips: Steal these Learning Strategies from Master Students

by Winston Sieck in Thinker Academy

Can a bunch of study tips really help you do better in school? It’s annoying, isn’t it? You see them in every class. The students who seem to breeze on through. Coolly killing one test after another. How do they do it? Can you pinch the best study tips from these master students? Yep, you […]
Check out 21 Study Tips: Steal these Learning Strategies from Master Students, an original post on Thinker Academy.
... Read more »

  • January 27, 2016
  • 08:30 AM
  • 117 views

Shelter Dogs Live Up To Expectations (Mostly)

by CAPB in Companion Animal Psychology Blog

Testing behaviour in the shelter is tricky, but most people who adopt a dog would do so again. Animal shelters often assess the behaviour of dogs before rehoming them, but because the tests are not always scientifically validated, Mornement et al (2014) developed the B.A.R.K. protocol. Results of the B.A.R.K. on 74 shelter dogs successfully predicted in-home ratings for fear and friendliness after the dogs had been adopted, but not anxiety, activity level or compliance. A follow-up paper by........ Read more »

  • January 27, 2016
  • 07:02 AM
  • 126 views

Simple Jury Persuasion: Why do people fall for what seems profound but is really nonsensical? 

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

We think these authors are trying to be amusing but they are very, very serious about their work and have even attracted the attention of someone they target in their article (Deepak Chopra). Essentially the authors focus on who falls prey to “profound pseudo-bullshit” and why. And that, is an important thing for us to […]

Related posts:
Simple Jury Persuasion: I’m too smart to fall for that!
Simple Jury Persuasion: “It makes no difference to me but I’m sure it would to a lot o........ Read more »

Pennycook, G, Cheyne, JA, Barr, N, Koehler, DJ, & Fugelsang, JA. (2015) On the reception and detection of pseudo-profound bullshit. Judgment and Decision Making, 10(6), 549-563. DOI: 10.3410/f.725974620.793511899  

  • January 27, 2016
  • 04:44 AM
  • 97 views

Men who stick up for women's rights are subjected to more sexual harassment at work

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

Upon mention of sexual harassment at work, it's natural to think immediately of women as the targets, but actually men experience harassment too. And it's on the increase, at least in the US. In 2013, men filed 17.6 per cent of the thousands of sexual harassment charges recorded in the country that year (up from 16.1 per cent in 2011).A new study in Psychology of Men and Masculinity surveyed 326 men in the US (most were white, 25 were gay or bisexual) about their experiences of sexual harassment........ Read more »

  • January 27, 2016
  • 04:17 AM
  • 145 views

People with good brain have overall good health

by Usman Paracha in SayPeople

Main Point:

Intelligent people have a genetic ability to fight with most of the health-related problems.

Published in:

Molecular Psychiatry

Study Further:

Researchers from the University of Edinburgh have found that genes that are linked to thinking skills and intelligence are also linked to health. This shows that the intelligent people have less chances of becoming sick, getting disease, or die early.

In a new study, researchers worked on the participants of UK Biobank (havin........ Read more »

Hagenaars, S., Harris, S., Davies, G., Hill, W., Liewald, D., Ritchie, S., Marioni, R., Fawns-Ritchie, C., Cullen, B., Malik, R.... (2016) Shared genetic aetiology between cognitive functions and physical and mental health in UK Biobank (N. Molecular Psychiatry. DOI: 10.1038/mp.2015.225  

  • January 27, 2016
  • 03:03 AM
  • 133 views

Feigning ADHD?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Feign: "to pretend to feel or be affected by (something)."I tread very carefully today with this post based on the findings reported by Paul Marshall and colleagues [1] who concluded that: "a significant percentage of those making a suspect effort will be diagnosed with ADHD [attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder] using the most commonly employed assessment methods."Their findings, based on the examination of "how many adult patients would plausibly receive a diagnosis of attention-........ Read more »

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