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  • May 26, 2014
  • 03:01 AM
  • 143 views

Emotional Intelligence Emotion Regulation Ability Helps You [Lawyers] Interact With Others More Effectively

by Dan DeFoe in Psycholawlogy

Our ability to regulate emotion affects our relationships, well-being, and stress.  This ability – emotion regulation – one of the four branches of ability-based emotional intelligence as assessed by the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT) see prior post on Psycholawlogy here, guides our self-regulation and our adaptation to our environment.  Recent research shows [...]
The post Emotional Intelligence Emotion Regulation Ability Helps You [Lawyers] Interact Wit........ Read more »

  • May 25, 2014
  • 03:12 PM
  • 297 views

Land of the Free, Home of the Afraid?

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Let’s take a Loony quiz! Do you believe any of these statements are true? Global warming isn’t real. GMO food is the devil. Organic and all natural are better. Science […]... Read more »

  • May 25, 2014
  • 04:25 AM
  • 172 views

Leaky gut as a later life event in autism?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Leaky gut and autism. Yes, it happens and I've talked about it quite a bit on this blog. If you're bored of me mentioning this potentially important process and how it may tie into at least some parts of the very heterogeneous autisms, feel free to click away now.Salisbury Cathedral @ Wikipedia If not, today's post centres on a short paper by Alexander Penn and colleagues [1] which looked at measured levels of intestinal permeability in infants deemed at high-risk of autism by virtue o........ Read more »

Alexander Penn, Tiffany Lai, Leslie Carver, Sharon Taylor, Geert Schmid-Schnbein, & Karen Dobkins. (2014) Intestinal permeability as measured by lactulose mannitol ratio continues to decrease during infancy after 3 months of age for both control infants and infants at high risk for autism spectrum disorders . The FASEB Journal. info:other/

  • May 24, 2014
  • 09:09 PM
  • 232 views

Ecstasy and oxytocin

by neurosci in Neuroscientifically Challenged










Although the drug methylenedioxymethamphetamine, better known as MDMA or ecstasy, is often lumped into the category of hallucinogens, it has a unique set of effects that make it very distinct from other drugs in this class. Specifically, along with creating a positive mood state and reducing anxiety, MDMA is known for fostering strong feelings of empathy and compassion.In some ways, MDMA appears to act on the brain in a manner similar to other amphetamines. Specifically, i........ Read more »

Kirkpatrick, M., Lee, R., Wardle, M., Jacob, S., & de Wit, H. (2014) Effects of MDMA and Intranasal Oxytocin on Social and Emotional Processing. Neuropsychopharmacology, 39(7), 1654-1663. DOI: 10.1038/npp.2014.12  

  • May 24, 2014
  • 04:49 PM
  • 270 views

Gendering the Pro-Anorexia Paradox: Men in Pro-Ana Spaces

by Andrea in Science of Eating Disorders


When someone says “pro-ana,” what comes to mind? Likely, given the strong reactions pro-anorexia websites provoke, you may be able to conjure up an image of what would take place in such a forum. Thoughts of “thinspiration,” emaciated and waif-like images, and starving tips likely spring to mind, alongside considerations of the dangers of a community that would encourage behaviors that can be very harmful to health.
I’d venture to say that it is unlikely that you have pictured a ........ Read more »

  • May 23, 2014
  • 04:43 PM
  • 26 views

It’s Simple, but it’s Not

by Rodney Steadman in Gravity's Pull

Living healthy is often reduced to silly soundbites and ridiculous fads in the media, but there is research that can point you in the right direction. ... Read more »

Bailin D., Goldman G., & Phartiyal P. (22014) Sugar-coating Science: How the Food Industry Misleads Consumers on Sugar. Center for Science and Demorcracy | Union of Concerned Scientists. info:/

Ekblom-Bak E., Ekblom B., Vikström M., de Faire U., & Hellénius M.L. (2014) The importance of non-exercise physical activity for cardiovascular health and longevity. British journal of sports medicine, 48(3), 233-8. PMID: 24167194  

Pes GM, Tolu F, Poulain M, Errigo A, Masala S, Pietrobelli A, Battistini NC, & Maioli M. (2013) Lifestyle and nutrition related to male longevity in Sardinia: an ecological study. Nutrition, metabolism, and cardiovascular diseases : NMCD, 23(3), 212-9. PMID: 21958760  

Poulain M., Herm A., & Pes G. (2013) The Blue Zones: areas of exceptional longevity around the world. Vienna Yearbook of Population Research, 87-108. info:/10.1553/populationyearbook2013s87

Malik V.S., Willett W.C., & Hu F.B. (2013) Global obesity: trends, risk factors and policy implications. Nature reviews. Endocrinology, 9(1), 13-27. PMID: 23165161  

World Health Organization. (2009) Europe puts health claims to the test. Bulletin of the World Health Organization, 87(9), 651-652. DOI: 10.2471/BLT.09.020909  

  • May 23, 2014
  • 03:17 PM
  • 191 views

Two Cheers for Social Media In Science

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

Zen Faulkes of the Neurodojo and Better Posters blogs (the former being established way back in 2002!) has just published an article in major neuroscience journal Neuron on the rise of blogs and social media as forums for scientific debate: The Vacuum Shouts Back: Postpublication Peer Review on Social Media I get a passing mention: […]The post Two Cheers for Social Media In Science appeared first on Neuroskeptic.... Read more »

  • May 23, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 177 views

Eyewitness identification and change blindness

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

We’ve written about change blindness (also known as inattentional blindness) before and it’s probably best known as including those experiments with the invisible gorillas. My personal favorite is the one where researchers hid their gorilla in brain scans and had radiologists review the slides. (And social science researchers wonder why professionals like radiologists usually just […]

Related posts:
Eyewitness testimony: It’s how you talk and who I think you are
When “I don’t k........ Read more »

  • May 23, 2014
  • 04:23 AM
  • 155 views

GcMAF and autism continued

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"GcMAF treatment was able to normalize the observed differences in the dysregulated gene expression of the endocannabinoid system of the autism group". That is the potentially very important finding from Dario Siniscalco and colleagues* (open-access here) continuing the increasing scientific interest in all-things GcMAF (Gc Macrophage Activating Factor) with autism in mind.Watson and the shark @ Wikipedia A quick recap first: I've talked GcMAF and autism on this blog before (see here a........ Read more »

  • May 22, 2014
  • 11:35 AM
  • 167 views

Getting ZZZs to get more As

by Katharine Blackwell in Contemplating Cognition

My students have sometimes been quick to dismiss some scientific finding as obvious: “Why did someone even need to do a study to show this? It’s just common sense!” Except, common sense isn’t always correct sense. And over the weekend while studying for exams, I think a great many of our students might have gone wrong following “common sense”, and been much better off if they’d heard about some of the tests of the obvious that turned out to be not so obv........ Read more »

  • May 22, 2014
  • 10:40 AM
  • 198 views

Do Public Salaries Increase Performance?

by Jeremiah Stanghini in Jeremiah Stanghini

With the recent news regarding Jill Abramson and the New York Times, I wanted to take a closer look at the academic literature to see if I could find something about public salaries. There’s certainly been a lot written about whether she … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • May 22, 2014
  • 05:03 AM
  • 199 views

Journal Club: Wild mice actually enjoy running on exercise wheels

by GrrlScientist in Maniraptora

SUMMARY: Wild mice frequently and voluntarily run on an exercise wheel if provided access to them in nature, even in the absence of a food reward -- findings that dispel the idea that wheel running is an artefact of captivity, indicative of a neurotic or repetitive stereotyped behaviour that may be associated with poor welfare. ... Read more »

Meijer J. H., & Robbers Y. (2014) Wheel running in the wild. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 281(1786), 20140210-20140210. DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2014.0210  

  • May 21, 2014
  • 08:04 PM
  • 229 views

History of neuroscience: Fritsch and Hitzig and the motor cortex

by neurosci in Neuroscientifically Challenged







The motor cortex (in red)






Neuroscience now views the cerebral cortex as a region of the brain that is essential for sensation, movement, and the heightened level of cognition we associate with humans as compared other animals. In the 1700s, however, many scientists considered the cortex to be a functionally insignificant outer shell of the brain. This corresponds to its original meaning when translated from Latin, which is "bark" (as in tree bark).By the 18........ Read more »

Gross, C. (2007) The Discovery of Motor Cortex and its Background. Journal of the History of the Neurosciences, 16(3), 320-331. DOI: 10.1080/09647040600630160  

  • May 21, 2014
  • 07:37 PM
  • 278 views

Preventing dog bites when you don't have a hero cat

by Cobb & Hecht in Do You Believe In Dog?

(source)Hey Julie! So much going on I need to take three deep breaths to calm down! Firstly - we have a winner! Actually - thanks to the awesome crew at SPARCS, we have two! Very excited to meet Marsha P and Kristi M at #SPARCS2014 and want to thank all the excellent people who responded to our giveaway shoutout on Facebook, Twitter and Google+. We hope those of your who weren't successful will consider still coming along or joining us on the livestream broadcast. Secondly - I loved learning abo........ Read more »

  • May 21, 2014
  • 11:08 AM
  • 247 views

Wild mice actually enjoy running on exercise wheels | @GrrlScientist

by GrrlScientist in GrrlScientist

Wild mice frequently and voluntarily run on an exercise wheel if provided access to them in nature, even in the absence of a food reward -- findings that dispel the idea that wheel running is an artefact of captivity, indicative of a neurotic or repetitive stereotyped behaviour that may be associated with poor welfare. ... Read more »

Meijer J. H., & Robbers Y. (2014) Wheel running in the wild. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 281(1786), 20140210-20140210. DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2014.0210  

  • May 21, 2014
  • 08:30 AM
  • 241 views

Did Dogs, Cats and Cows Predict the M9 Earthquake in Japan in 2011?

by CAPB in Companion Animal Psychology Blog

Is it possible that animals had advance warning of the Tohoku earthquake?Photo: Paul Atkinson / ShutterstockThere have long been reports of animals behaving strangely before large quakes, including an account of snakes, weasels and rats leaving home prior to an earthquake in Greece in 373BC. But there is still a lack of scientific evidence.  A new study in Japan investigates pet owners’ reports of cat and dog behaviour, and changes in dairy milk production, before the magnitude 9 earthqua........ Read more »

Yamauchi, H., Uchiyama, H., Ohtani, N., & Ohta, M. (4) Unusual animal behaviour preceding the 2011 earthquake off the Pacific coast of Tohoku, Japan: A way to predict the approach of large earthquakes. Animals, 131-145. info:/

  • May 21, 2014
  • 05:37 AM
  • 86 views

Can cognitive training boost self-control?

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

I’m someone who when sat in front of a fast food menu will always make a beeline for the most artery-clogging burger and a large fries. At the same time, I’m fascinated by those around me who will happily order “regular” or “small” servings (or even the dreaded “healthy” alternative). How do they resist temptation? What distinguishes these intriguing individuals from the rest of us – and, by the way, where can I get some more of that prized self-control?I’m not alone. Underst........ Read more »

  • May 21, 2014
  • 04:25 AM
  • 199 views

Vaccines not associated with autism: a meta-analysis

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

I'm gonna warn you that this is probably the longest of my ramblings so far covering one of the most controversial topics linked to autism in recent years... so it might be best if I provide you with some music to start with (Pink Floyd and Breathe) and suggest that you get yourself comfortable.The singer @ Wikipedia So then..."Findings of this meta-analysis suggest that vaccinations are not associated with the development of autism or autism spectrum disorder".That was the conclusion ........ Read more »

  • May 20, 2014
  • 08:03 AM
  • 207 views

Why Women are Better CEOs, Presidents, and Prime Ministers

by Jeremiah Stanghini in Jeremiah Stanghini

New research shows that women are far better at handling stress than men. I suppose that’s not a newsflash as most people already think that’s true, but consider the way in which this study frames it [Emphasis added]: We consistently … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • May 20, 2014
  • 07:00 AM
  • 86 views

A replication tour de force

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

In his famous 1974 lecture, Cargo Cult Science, Richard Feynman recalls his experience of suggesting to a psychology student that she should try to repeat a previous experiment before attempting a novel one:“She was very delighted with this new idea, and went to her professor. And his reply was, no, you cannot do that, because the experiment has already been done and you would be wasting time. This was in about 1947 or so, and it seems to have been the general policy then to not try to repeat ........ Read more »

Klein, R., Ratliff, K., Vianello, M., Adams, Jr., R., Bahník, �., Bernstein, M., Bocian, K., Brandt, M., Brooks, B., Brumbaugh, C.... (2014) Data from Investigating Variation in Replicability: A “Many Labs” Replication Project. Journal of Open Psychology Data, 2(1). DOI: 10.5334/jopd.ad  

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