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  • November 11, 2014
  • 05:29 AM
  • 98 views

Who are the most eminent psychologists of the modern era?

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

A new paper identifies Albert Bandura as themost eminent psychologist of the modern era.Twelve years ago the behaviourist B.F. Skinner topped a list of the 100 most eminent psychologists of the twentieth century, followed by Jean Piaget and Sigmund Freud. Now a team led by Ed Diener has used their own criteria to compile a list of the 200 most eminent psychologists of the modern era (i.e. people whose careers occurred primarily after 1956).Here is the top 10: Albert Bandura in first place, ........ Read more »

Diener, E., Oishi, S., & Park, J. (2014) An incomplete list of eminent psychologists of the modern era. Archives of Scientific Psychology, 2(1), 20-31. DOI: 10.1037/arc0000006  

  • November 11, 2014
  • 04:50 AM
  • 336 views

Psychiatric comorbidity in post H1N1 vaccination narcolespy?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

I can imagine that the paper by Atilla Szakács and colleagues [1] is likely to draw some rather differing opinions about potential importance based on their subject matter and methods/participant numbers looking at the frequency of psychiatric comorbidity among those with narcolepsy including narcolepsy post H1N1 vaccination. The fact that autism - "pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (i.e., atypical autism)" - is mentioned as one of the comorbidity in the post-vaccination ........ Read more »

  • November 10, 2014
  • 08:59 PM
  • 99 views

Our unclear understanding of ADHD

by neurosci in Neuroscientifically Challenged

Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD, has engendered a great deal of debate over the past several decades. ADHD is a psychiatric disorder that involves symptoms of inattention (e.g. being easily distracted, having difficulty focusing) or symptoms of hyperactivity (e.g. being fidgety or restless), or a combination of both types of symptoms. The controversy surrounding ADHD became a bit louder in the 1990s, when the number of children being prescribed stimulant drugs like methylphenid........ Read more »

  • November 10, 2014
  • 09:51 AM
  • 97 views

When we lie to children, are we teaching them to be dishonest?

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

Cookie Monster - one ofthe characters featuredin this research.Most parents lie to their children, often as a way to control their behaviour. A new study asks whether lying to the little ones increases the likelihood that they too will lie. The authors, Chelsea Hays and Leslie Carver, say theirs is the first attempt to investigate this possibility.Nearly two hundred children aged three to seven were each put through a similar scenario, one at a time. First, they were invited to go through to the........ Read more »

  • November 10, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 80 views

Simple Jury Persuasion: The “halo of scientific validity” effect

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

We’ve written about the lack of evidence for the much-feared “CSI Effect”. But here’s an interesting study about the simple “appearance of science” as opposed to the bells and whistles of high-tech “CSI”-like evidence. All it takes is the use of “scientese” (scientific sounding words)–not to be confused with “lawyerese” (which we wrote about here […]

Related posts:
Simple Jury Persuasion: Educating jurors about science may have no effect
Simple Jury Persuasi........ Read more »

  • November 10, 2014
  • 03:01 AM
  • 84 views

Metabolomics and autism: the continuing search for biomarkers

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

I'm always a happy bunny when some of my own research findings receive something like independent replication. So it was when I read the monster paper from Paul West and colleagues [1] (open-access) reporting results based on not one, not two, not three, not even four, but five mass spectrometric methods looking for potential biomarkers for autism. Metabolomics in action (see here for an introduction to this topic).Rosina @ Wikipedia The particular reason for my excitement was the........ Read more »

  • November 9, 2014
  • 12:48 PM
  • 122 views

If being sad is “bad”, then why is there sad music?

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

We tell children not to look so sad. We tell adults to wipe that sad look off their face and smile. We even worry that if you are sad too long, you might need medical attention. Yet, for most of us, when life gets you down, you put on some sad music. So if sadness is such a negative, why do we spend our money and time wallowing in these sad tunes?... Read more »

  • November 8, 2014
  • 12:55 PM
  • 115 views

When it comes to sleep recommendations, what about the children?

by Gabriel in Lunatic Laboratories

Sleep is a hot topic lately, are we getting too much, too little, how much is enough? However, most of these questions are for adults, so what about children? Well as it turns out a new study used activity monitors to track how sleep habits changed in younger and older teens as they grew during a two-year period. Key findings from this study has also lent t0 new support to recent recommendations by the American Academy of Pediatrics that middle and high schools avoid starting earlier than 8:30 a........ Read more »

  • November 8, 2014
  • 04:51 AM
  • 90 views

UK Millennium Cohort Study: School and the disabled child

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Quite recently the BBC News online ran with the headline: "Disabled children's behaviour 'deteriorates at school'". The story revolved around the findings reported by Rebecca Fauth and colleagues [1] (open-access) looking at "the extent to which the associations between disability and behaviour are linked to children’s developmental stage and thus may be ‘grown out of’ as children enter school and move out of the early years". I should add that, at the time of writing, the Fauth paper is d........ Read more »

Connelly R, & Platt L. (2014) Cohort Profile: UK Millennium Cohort Study (MCS). International journal of epidemiology. PMID: 24550246  

  • November 7, 2014
  • 07:39 PM
  • 124 views

Friends with Benefits

by Abena Edugyan in Your Active Edge

Two studies that look at motivation and physical activity. ... Read more »

Janssen, I., Dugan, S., Karavolos, K., Lynch, E., & Powell, L. (2013) Correlates of 15-Year Maintenance of Physical Activity in Middle-Aged Women. International Journal of Behavioral Medicine., 21(3), 511-518. DOI: 10.1007/s12529-013-9324-z  

  • November 7, 2014
  • 04:50 PM
  • 43 views

It hurts! Atheists and Christians don’t feel each others pain, but with a twist.

by Tom Rees in Epiphenom

For many people, their religion is like a badge of social identity. You feel an affinity with people who share a religion – not surprising given that you will share many cultural and social touch points. But will you feel their pain? If shown a picture of a Christian grimacing, will you mentally flinch? What about [Read More...]

... Read more »

  • November 7, 2014
  • 09:01 AM
  • 117 views

You can tell a lot from looking at someone’s face…

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

Our mock jurors (and many others as well) tend to believe the eyes are the “window to the soul” and that by simply looking at the eyes of another, they can intuit truthfulness and character. But it can be even easier! Just look at the face and you can actually assess introversion/extroversion, competence/incompetence, dominance/submission, and […]

Related posts:
I can tell from your face that you are suicidal
Never trust a man with a wide face
Wearing your religion on your face


... Read more »

Olivola, C., Funk, F., & Todorov, A. (2014) Social attributions from faces bias human choices. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 18(11), 566-570. DOI: 10.1016/j.tics.2014.09.007  

  • November 7, 2014
  • 08:04 AM
  • 57 views

When we get depressed, we lose our ability to go with our gut instincts

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

People who are depressed often complain that they find it difficult to make decisions. A new study provides an explanation. Carina Remmers and her colleagues tested 29 patients diagnosed with major depression and 27 healthy controls and they found that the people with depression had an impaired ability to go with their gut instincts, or what we might call intuition.Intuition is not an easy skill to measure. The researchers' approach was to present participants with triads of words (e.g. SALT DEE........ Read more »

Remmers C, Topolinski S, Dietrich DE, & Michalak J. (2014) Impaired intuition in patients with major depressive disorder. The British journal of clinical psychology / the British Psychological Society. PMID: 25307321  

  • November 7, 2014
  • 04:11 AM
  • 135 views

Treating depression: exercise or anti-inflammatory meds?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Reiterating my primary caveat on this blog about not giving anything that looks, sounds or smells like medical and/or clinical advice, I'm bringing three papers to the research blogging table today, all published in the JAMA journal family and all talking about depression / depressive symptoms.See my hat... @ Wikipedia First up is the paper by Ole Köhler and colleagues [1] reviewing "the antidepressant and possible adverse effects of anti-inflammatory interventions". Some media i........ Read more »

Ole Köhler, Michael E. Benros, Merete Nordentoft, Michael E. Farkouh, Rupa L. Iyengar, Ole Mors, & Jesper Krogh. (2014) Effect of Anti-inflammatory Treatment on Depression, Depressive Symptoms, and Adverse Effects. JAMA Psychiatry. info:/doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2014.1611

Snehal M. Pinto Pereira, Marie-Claude Geoffroy, & Christine Power. (2014) Depressive Symptoms and Physical Activity During 3 Decades in Adult Life. JAMA Psychiatry. info:/doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2014.1240

Toseeb, U., Brage, S., Corder, K., Dunn, V., Jones, P., Owens, M., St Clair, M., van Sluijs, E., & Goodyer, I. (2014) Exercise and Depressive Symptoms in Adolescents. JAMA Pediatrics. DOI: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2014.1794  

  • November 6, 2014
  • 09:21 PM
  • 104 views

Pareidolia Killed the Paranormal Star

by Rodney Steadman in Gravity's Pull

How pareidolia and priming influences electronic voice phenomena or EVP.... Read more »

  • November 6, 2014
  • 09:30 AM
  • 100 views

Infants Can Tell If You’re a Reliable Informant

by amikulak in Daily Observations

It’s hard to know how babies think, since they’re still getting a handle on language skills.  One strategy that researchers use to gain some insight is eye tracking, which allows […]... Read more »

Tummeltshammer, K., Wu, R., Sobel, D., & Kirkham, N. (2014) Infants Track the Reliability of Potential Informants. Psychological Science, 25(9), 1730-1738. DOI: 10.1177/0956797614540178  

  • November 6, 2014
  • 07:13 AM
  • 98 views

Countries with more gender equality score more Olympic medals - among women and men

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

There are huge benefits to be gained when women and men are given equal opportunities. For example, companies with at least one woman on their board are more successful. In countries with less stereotyped views about women's abilities, girls tend to perform better at science. Now a team led by Jennifer Berdahl has extended this line of research to the realm of sport. In countries with greater gender equality, they find, both women and men tend to perform better at the Olympics.The researchers lo........ Read more »

  • November 6, 2014
  • 04:30 AM
  • 84 views

Neurotensin, autism and tail-chasing Bull Terrriers?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

I'm not kidding.The paper by Tsilioni and colleagues [1] (open-access) did indeed look at serum levels of neurotensin and corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) in a cohort of children diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) alongside levels in tail-chasing Bull Terrier dogs as compared to unaffected [non tail-chasing] Bull Terriers (BTs) and Labrador Retriever dogs. You may well smirk or even laugh at such research but, as per the recent [preliminary] broccoli chemical - autis........ Read more »

  • November 6, 2014
  • 04:25 AM
  • 117 views

Memory training boosts IQ

by Richard Kunert in Brain's Idea

Is the IQ set in stone once we hit adulthood? ‘Yes it is’ used to be the received wisdom. A new meta-analysis challenges this view and gives hope to all of us who feel that mother nature should have endowed us with more IQ points. But is the training worth it? Intelligence increases in adults […]... Read more »

  • November 5, 2014
  • 12:34 PM
  • 105 views

What is the most instantly recognisable song?

by Henkjan Honing in Music Matters

Everyone knows a hook when they hear one, but scientists don’t know why. By playing the Hooked on Music game you are exploring the science of songs and helping us to unlock what makes music catchy.

Last weekend the preliminary outcome of the online game was announced in Manchester, UK at the MOSI, answering the question: What is the most instantly recognisable song? Interestingly, numerous media started to report on this. A small media hype?... Read more »

J.A. Burgoyne, D. Bountouridis, J. van Balen, & H. Honing. (2013) Hooked: A Game for Discovering What Makes Music Catchy. Proceedings of the 14th International Society for Music Information Retrieval Conference , 245-250. info:/

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