Post List

Psychology posts

(Modify Search »)

  • March 30, 2014
  • 06:33 AM
  • 98 views

The right inferior frontal cortex - The brain’s cognitive brake

by Robert Seymour in NeuroFractal

Whilst go/no-go tasks and stop-tasks have given researchers a lot of information about “pure” inhibition, this is not how people typically stop themselves performing actions in real life. In the past few years a slightly more ecologically valid paradigm has emerged in which participants anticipate they might have to inhibit a response, followed by the normal Go/No-Go signal. Participant’s responses are very slightly slower on go trials if they anticipate having to stop. This ha........ Read more »

  • March 30, 2014
  • 04:58 AM
  • 58 views

Mental health consequences of childhood cancer

by Eva Alisic in Trauma Recovery

Childhood cancer is no longer the death sentence it once was and survival rates are currently around 80%. How are survivors affected by their experience and how does it impact on their family? Lifetime prevalence of cancer-related PTSD has been estimated at 20-35% in survivors.
New research challenges these estimates, drawing attention to the 'focusing illusion'... Read more »

  • March 28, 2014
  • 08:06 PM
  • 116 views

Inflaming inflammation and psychiatry

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

The systematic review published by Mitchell & Goldstein [1] kinda says it all when it comes to our current view of the topic of inflammation and psychiatry, and in particular inflammation and neuropsychiatric conditions such as autism, schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD): "There is preliminary evidence for elevated markers of inflammation in this population".All at sea (JMW Turner) @ Wikipedia I've talked quite a bit on this blog about how, a........ Read more »

  • March 28, 2014
  • 10:56 AM
  • 39 views

Parenthood, Trial or Tribulation? Part 2

by Psych Your Mind in Psych Your Mind

On New Year’s Day I became a parent, sparking my curiosity in the research on parenting and well-being and inspiring a four-part series on parenthood and happiness. This is the second post. Check out the first post here.Are parents happier than non-parents? Researchers have generally set about trying to answer this deceptively simple question in three ways:Are people with children happier than those without children?This is the most common approach to research on parenthood and well-being. In ........ Read more »

  • March 28, 2014
  • 10:17 AM
  • 86 views

Wellbeing is shaped by your day's little highlights, not merely its mishaps

by Alex Fradera in BPS Occupational Digest

Wellbeing research has tended to model work-life as a default state punctuated by negative events such as conflicts, mistakes, or unwelcome change. In this way, it follows the broader model of psychological health research that focuses on harmful interruption to normal functioning , a model that Martin Seligman and Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi were contesting in 2000 when they launched the Positive Psychology movement. In a new paper, Joyce Bono and colleagues further this tradition by drawing attent........ Read more »

  • March 28, 2014
  • 09:58 AM
  • 105 views

Scientists Convince People Their Hands Are Rocks

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish

No matter how much of a critical thinker you consider yourself, your brain is pretty gullible. With a few minutes and a couple of props, your brain can be convinced that one of your limbs is made of rubber or invisible, or that your whole body is the size of a Barbie doll’s. All these illusions […]The post Scientists Convince People Their Hands Are Rocks appeared first on Inkfish.... Read more »

Senna, I., Maravita, A., Bolognini, N., & Parise, C. (2014) The Marble-Hand Illusion. PLoS ONE, 9(3). DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0091688  

  • March 28, 2014
  • 09:57 AM
  • 28 views

Patching the Leaky Pipeline of Women in STEM

by amikulak in Daily Observations

March is designated Women’s History Month in the United States, recognizing “generations of women whose commitment to nature and the planet have proved invaluable to society.” And yet, as we […]... Read more »

  • March 28, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 48 views

Simple Jury Persuasion: “It makes no difference to me but I’m sure it would to a lot of other people.”

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

The study of bias fascinates us. We can easily spot prejudice in others but are oblivious to our own biases. We often ask a question at the end of a research project about community values and whether our (uniformly unbiased and considerate) mock jurors think others in the area would be biased against a party […]

Related posts:
Simple Jury Persuasion: Oooh! Seeing that makes me so angry!!!
Simple Jury Persuasion: Font Choice and Bias
Simple Jury Persuasion: Activate the ‘intuitive prose........ Read more »

  • March 27, 2014
  • 12:21 PM
  • 100 views

The new CDC autism prevalence rate

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Whilst quite a lot of media space is currently being devoted to talking about the study by Rich Stoner and colleagues [1] and sweeping generalisations like the BBC headline: Autism 'begins long before birth' with seemingly only little appreciation of the small-scale nature of the study and little details linked to samples being post-mortem tissues, other important autism-related news is also out there.CDC US autism prevalence estimates @ Autism Speaks I'm ........ Read more »

Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring Network Surveillance Year 2010 Principal Investigators. (2014) Prevalence of Autism Spectrum Disorder Among Children Aged 8 Years — Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring Network, 11 Sites, United States, 2010. Morbidity . info:/

  • March 27, 2014
  • 11:46 AM
  • 93 views

Kids Come to Like Their Own Before They Dislike “Outsiders”

by amikulak in Daily Observations

Social groups form along all sorts of lines — from nationality to age to shared interests, and everything in between. We come to identify with our groups, whichever those might […]... Read more »

  • March 27, 2014
  • 10:59 AM
  • 101 views

The Slippery Question of Control in OCD

by Rebecca Schwarzlose in Garden of the Mind

OCD is something of a paradox when it comes to the concept of control. The illness has two characteristic features: obsessions based on fears or regrets that occupy a sufferer’s thoughts and make him or her anxious, and compulsions, or repetitive and unnecessary actions that may or may not relieve the anxiety. For decades, psychiatrists and psychologists have theorized that control lies at the heart of this cycle. . . ... Read more »

  • March 26, 2014
  • 12:27 PM
  • 88 views

Fractal organization in MMOs

by neuroecology in Neuroecology

One of my favorite pet topics is using MMOs (online games) to understand questions of social structure and economics. Benedikt Fuchs looked at social structure in the game Pardus: But exactly what kinds of structures form and to what extent these groupings depend on the environment is still the subject of much debate. So an interesting […]... Read more »

Fuchs B, Sornette D, & Thurner S. (2014) Fractal multi-level organisation of human groups in a virtual world. arXiv. info:/

  • March 26, 2014
  • 09:53 AM
  • 61 views

Busted Bracket? Science Suggests Strategy to Improve March Madness Picks

by amikulak in Daily Observations

It’s official: No one on this planet will walk away with Warren Buffett’s $1 billion dollar prize for filling out a perfect March Madness bracket. Hopes for the money were […]... Read more »

  • March 26, 2014
  • 09:30 AM
  • 20 views

Is I/O Psychology Ruining Human Resources?

by Richard Landers in NeoAcademic

In a recent issue of Human Resource Management Journal, Godard[1] provides a provocatively-titled opinion piece: “The psychologisation of employment relations?”  The central arguments of this paper are that 1) human resources management (HRM) is interdisciplinary, 2) industrial relations has historically been an important part of HRM, 3) organizational behavior has taken over HRM, pushing out industrial […]Related articles from NeoAcademic:Free Gamification of Human Resources........ Read more »

Godard, J. (2014) The psychologisation of employment relations?. Human Resource Management Journal, 24(1), 1-18. DOI: 10.1111/1748-8583.12030  

  • March 26, 2014
  • 08:30 AM
  • 92 views

Animals, Pets and Vermin

by CAPB in Companion Animal Psychology Blog

What do animals mean to you and what role do they play in your life? These and related questions were recently asked of ordinary people by the Mass Observation Project in the UK, and the results, in a paper by Alison Sealey and Nickie Charles, are fascinating.Photo: pjmorley / ShutterstockSince 1937, the Mass Observation Projecthas been collecting information from ordinary people about life in Britain. Set up with the idea of creating “an anthropology of ourselves,” data collection con........ Read more »

Sealey, A., & Charles, N. (2013) "What Do Animals Mean to You?": Naming and Relating to Nonhuman Animals. Anthrozoos: A Multidisciplinary Journal of The Interactions of People , 26(4), 485-503. DOI: 10.2752/175303713X13795775535652  

  • March 26, 2014
  • 04:54 AM
  • 96 views

Vision impairment and ADHD?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Science often has the ability to surprise.So it was when I first read the paper by Dawn Decarlo and colleagues* (open-access here) which suggested that: "children with vision impairment may be more likely to be diagnosed with ADHD [attention deficit hyperactivity disorder] than children in the general population". I should point out that this observation should not be totally unexpected given some media for other studies by the authors (see here).Lady in a green jacket @ Wikipedia &nbs........ Read more »

Decarlo DK, Bowman E, Monroe C, Kline R, McGwin G Jr, & Owsley C. (2014) Prevalence of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder among children with vision impairment. Journal of AAPOS : the official publication of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus / American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus, 18(1), 10-4. PMID: 24568975  

  • March 25, 2014
  • 07:12 AM
  • 91 views

Never the earner, always the bride: How male breadwinners view women in the workplace

by Alex Fradera in BPS Occupational Digest

Across a series of studies, a new article demonstrates that married men who have a more traditional 'breadwinner role' at home tend to have more negative views on women in the workplace. Across their studies, Sreedhari Desai, Dolly Chugh and Arthur Brief defined traditional marriages as those where the wife was not employed, contrasted with couples that were dual-earning.  Firstly they employed data from US national surveys. In the first data set - 282 married men in 1996 - those in more tr........ Read more »

  • March 25, 2014
  • 12:02 AM
  • 91 views

“I am Working-Class”: Self-Identification as a Measure of Social Class in Educational Research

by Mark Rubin in Mark Rubin's Social Psychology Research Blog

Governments around the world are trying to open up higher education to working-class people. For example, in January this year, the White House released a report titled: "Increasing college opportunity for low-income students: Promising models and a call to action." In the context of this general push towards widening participation in higher education, my colleagues and I have been developing a research project that aims to investigate social class differences in social integration among student........ Read more »

  • March 24, 2014
  • 07:02 AM
  • 103 views

Think conspiracy theorists live on the fringes? Think again!

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

Amazingly, a study published in a highly respected medical journal (as opposed to, say, a Bigfoot site) found that 49% of those living in the United States believe at least one medical conspiracy theory. That’s only where it starts–18% believe in three or more. Wow.  The researchers wondered if US residents believe the public health […]

Related posts:
Conspiracy theorists and survey design
Conspiracy theories that haven’t come up in pretrial research (yet)
Osama bin Laden is de........ Read more »

  • March 24, 2014
  • 05:30 AM
  • 101 views

A specific female ASD phenotype is emerging...

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

The title of this brief post is a quote taken from the abstract of the paper by Frazier and colleagues [1] who, following an analysis of participants included in the Simons Simplex Collection, concluded that autism research and practice might well consider looking at differences in the presentation of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) between the sexes.The Lady of Shalott @ Wikipedia Including nearly 2500 people with autism including over 2100 males and 304 females, examining ........ Read more »

Frazier TW, Georgiades S, Bishop SL, & Hardan AY. (2014) Behavioral and cognitive characteristics of females and males with autism in the simons simplex collection. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 53(3), 329-340000. PMID: 24565360  

join us!

Do you write about peer-reviewed research in your blog? Use ResearchBlogging.org to make it easy for your readers — and others from around the world — to find your serious posts about academic research.

If you don't have a blog, you can still use our site to learn about fascinating developments in cutting-edge research from around the world.

Register Now

Research Blogging is powered by SMG Technology.

To learn more, visit seedmediagroup.com.