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  • April 13, 2016
  • 10:00 AM
  • 169 views

How to Choose the Right Puppy in Four Easy Steps

by CAPB in Companion Animal Psychology Blog

The vital questions to ask before you get your puppy-dog. Normal 0 false false false EN-CA X-NONE X-NONE ... Read more »

Dupont, S., Butaye, P., Claerebout, E., Theuns, S., Duchateau, L., Van de Maele, I., & Daminet, S. (2013) Enteropathogens in pups from pet shops and breeding facilities. Journal of Small Animal Practice, 54(9), 475-480. DOI: 10.1111/jsap.12119  

Morrow, M., Ottobre, J., Ottobre, A., Neville, P., St-Pierre, N., Dreschel, N., & Pate, J. (2015) Breed-dependent differences in the onset of fear-related avoidance behavior in puppies. Journal of Veterinary Behavior: Clinical Applications and Research, 10(4), 286-294. DOI: 10.1016/j.jveb.2015.03.002  

Schumaker, B., Miller, M., Grosdidier, P., Cavender, J., Montgomery, D., Cornish, T., Farr, R., Driscoll, M., Maness, L., Gray, T.... (2012) Canine distemper outbreak in pet store puppies linked to a high-volume dog breeder. Journal of Veterinary Diagnostic Investigation, 24(6), 1094-1098. DOI: 10.1177/1040638712460531  

  • April 13, 2016
  • 07:02 AM
  • 49 views

Bias against mixed race people depends on where you  live

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

Here’s a somewhat predictable but still disturbing finding: If you live in an area where you are not exposed to other races—those of mixed race are confusing to you and that confusion leads to bias against anyone of mixed race. At least confusion is better than outrage—which is what greeted the makers of Cheerios cereal […]

Related posts:
Who is multiracial? Apparently, it depends on how you ask… 
Playing the race card: When it works and why it doesn’t
So we cannot talk about........ Read more »

  • April 13, 2016
  • 06:42 AM
  • 182 views

What does an ambivalent mood do to your problem-solving skills?

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

Psychologists have got a pretty good picture of how we’re influenced by the big emotional states. Feeling positive encourages an explorative cognitive style that is risk-tolerant and well suited to the open aspects of creativity, whereas negative emotions make us sensitive to threat and prone to vigilant, focused thinking. But what happens when our emotional states are a mix of the two – when we’re in an ambivalent mood? Appropriately, research to date has been inconsistent, with some work........ Read more »

  • April 13, 2016
  • 03:25 AM
  • 175 views

Vitamin D deficiency and psychosis

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

In amongst my various ramblings about how vitamin D - the sunshine vitamin/hormone - might show more than a few connections to conditions/labels outside of just the English disease (see here), I've covered some science on a possible connection with psychosis (see here) and schizophrenia (see here). There are still gaps in terms of the hows and whys of vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency when it comes to this area of psychiatry, but I believe there is enough science in this area to initially w........ Read more »

Lally, J., Gardner-Sood, P., Firdosi, M., Iyegbe, C., Stubbs, B., Greenwood, K., Murray, R., Smith, S., Howes, O., & Gaughran, F. (2016) Clinical correlates of vitamin D deficiency in established psychosis. BMC Psychiatry, 16(1). DOI: 10.1186/s12888-016-0780-2  

  • April 12, 2016
  • 07:18 PM
  • 208 views

The scientific brain: How the brain repurposes itself to learn scientific concepts

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

The human brain was initially used for basic survival tasks, such as staying safe and hunting and gathering. Yet, 200,000 years later, the same human brain is able to learn abstract concepts, like momentum, energy, and gravity, which have only been formally defined in the last few centuries. New research has now uncovered how the brain is able to acquire brand new types of ideas.
... Read more »

Robert A. Mason, & Marcel Adam Just. (2016) Neural Representations of Physics Concepts . Psychological Science. info:other/Pre-print

  • April 12, 2016
  • 07:40 AM
  • 154 views

The most effective leaders clash with their company culture

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

Anyone will tell you that the most successful organisations have leaders who match the company culture. A CEO fixated on getting things done should lead somewhere driven by outcomes, a “mission culture”, whereas a people-focused leader suits a place focused on involvement and participation. This way everything is neat, tidy and aligned, with messages presented consistently, providing staff with reliable guides as to how to behave. But this is not what the data says in a new study published i........ Read more »

  • April 12, 2016
  • 07:13 AM
  • 146 views

Hanging out with virtual reality spiders helps arachnophobes see real spiders as smaller and less scary

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

By guest blogger Melissa HogenboomA little fear can be a good thing but when it develops into a phobia, it can become debilitating. One way therapists treat fear disorders is using a technique called exposure therapy. As its name suggests, it involves gradually exposing a person to the very thing they are afraid of.The problem is that in the comfort of a therapist's office, recreating the fearful event is not always straightforward. This means patients may not be able to realistically confront w........ Read more »

Shiban, Y., Fruth, M., Pauli, P., Kinateder, M., Reichenberger, J., & Mühlberger, A. (2016) Treatment effect on biases in size estimation in spider phobia. Biological Psychology. DOI: 10.1016/j.biopsycho.2016.03.005  

  • April 12, 2016
  • 02:51 AM
  • 160 views

Evidence of blurring on the autism spectrum edges

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

A quote to begin: "multiple types of genetic risk for ASDs [autism spectrum disorders] influence a continuum of behavioral and developmental traits, the severe tail of which can result in diagnosis with an ASD or other neuropsychiatric disorder."That was the bottom line of the findings reported by Elise Robinson and colleagues [1] looking at data from "several large ASD consortium and population-based resources" (N~38,000) including the fabulous resource that is ALSPAC. Specifically an........ Read more »

Robinson EB, St Pourcain B, Anttila V, Kosmicki JA, Bulik-Sullivan B, Grove J, Maller J, Samocha KE, Sanders SJ, Ripke S.... (2016) Genetic risk for autism spectrum disorders and neuropsychiatric variation in the general population. Nature genetics. PMID: 26998691  

  • April 11, 2016
  • 02:19 AM
  • 160 views

Levels of paranoia are higher in autism: systematic review

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Paranoia, defined as the unfounded or exaggerated idea that something or someone is deliberately trying to psychologically, physically or financially harm you, is not an uncommon transient sentiment among the general population at one time or another. On a more pathological level, paranoid schizophrenia perhaps represents the archetypal label where paranoia assumes an altogether more persistent and 'life-changing' effect; also potentially escalating into more extreme behaviour/s.The idea th........ Read more »

  • April 10, 2016
  • 06:30 PM
  • 169 views

Spaced Practice

by Joshua Fisher in Text Savvy

Spaced practice, also called distributed practice, refers to the practice—after initial learning—of leaving gaps in time between sessions devoted to reviewing previously learned material. This stands in contrast to its much less effective counterpart, massed practice, which "crams" all of the review together in time.... Read more »

  • April 9, 2016
  • 10:00 PM
  • 167 views

Interleaving

by Joshua Fisher in Text Savvy

Many of the misconceptions we deal with in mathematics education in particular can be seen as the result of dealing with objects of 'low discriminability' (objects that are hard to tell apart). In many cases, these objects really are hard to tell apart, and in others we simply make them hard through our sequencing.... Read more »

  • April 9, 2016
  • 03:59 AM
  • 196 views

Is empathising rather than systemising linked to maths achievement?

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"Contrary to our hypothesis, we found no relationship between systemizing and math achievement after controlling for domain general abilities and no relationship between the systemizing brain type (greater discrepancy between systemizing and empathizing) and math achievement."That quote taken from the study published by Emily Escovar and colleagues [1] (open-access available here) provides some blogging fodder today. Based on some ideas proposed in autism research circles that "mathematics ........ Read more »

  • April 8, 2016
  • 04:35 AM
  • 99 views

More time in day nursery before age two is associated with higher cognitive scores at age four

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

Many working parents experience guilt about sending their young children off to day nursery, especially in light of research published in the 2000s that suggested that too much early childcare is associated with later behavioural problems. However, a new study in the International Journal of Behavioural Development paints a more positive picture – the more time children spent in day nursery before the age of two (defined as group-based childcare outside the home), the better their cognitive pe........ Read more »

  • April 8, 2016
  • 03:03 AM
  • 181 views

Time to screen for vitamin D and calcium levels in autism

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

"The data highlight a gap in calcium and vitamin D supplement prescribing practices among providers caring for children with ASD [autism spectrum disorder] as well as a gap in the practice of checking 25(OH)D levels."So said research published by Shylaja Srinivasan and colleagues [1] (open-access) with findings tied into an important issue in autism research and clinical practice: potential inequalities when it comes to the provision of suitable healthcare and accessing appropriat........ Read more »

  • April 7, 2016
  • 07:45 AM
  • 224 views

How does the next generation of clinical psychologists think about mental disorders?

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

UK trainee clinical psychologists favour social and cognitive approaches to mental health rather than biological To stereotype the mental health professions, psychiatrists tend to see mental health problems as being predominantly biological in nature, while clinical psychologists see them as caused more by social circumstances. This is a generalisation, of course, because individuals in each camp hold a variety of perspectives. But surveys do usually reveal average differences in perspectiv........ Read more »

  • April 7, 2016
  • 04:18 AM
  • 200 views

On genes, environment, broccoli and autism (again)

by Paul Whiteley in Questioning Answers

Picture: Carl Warner: http://www.carlwarner.com/I'm serving up two peer-reviewed papers for your reading delight today which draw attention to the ideas that (a) the 'causes' of autism are likely complex and as heterogeneous as the label itself, (b) gene x environment interactions affecting risk of autism are starting to get some good scientific research airtime and (c) don't 'dis the broccoli [chemical] autism connection just yet...The first paper by Brandon Pearson and colleagues [1] (ope........ Read more »

  • April 6, 2016
  • 12:03 PM
  • 238 views

Words We Say to Dogs (and Other Things Scientists Learned Watching People Play with Pets)

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish



"Who wants to generate some DATA??" are probably not words you've ever said while taking your dog's leash and tennis ball from the closet. But thanks to videos of people playing with their dogs, scientists now know what words you are likely to use. They also discovered how women's tussling and tug-of-war are different from men's—and what the professionals do better.

The scientists are Alexandra Horowitz and Julie Hecht of Barnard College's Dog Cognition Lab. They asked members of the p........ Read more »

  • April 6, 2016
  • 10:00 AM
  • 199 views

Less Stress at the Vet for Dogs and Cats

by CAPB in Companion Animal Psychology Blog

Essential tips for better vet visits.You stealthily trapped your cat in the lounge, but at the first sight of the carrier she ran to hide under the sofa – and she’s not coming out. You move the sofa and grab her as she flees, then get scratched in the process of forcing her into the carrier. Or you’re in the waiting room at the vet’s and your dog keeps getting up and trying to leave. When you are called to the consulting room, he parks his rear end on the floor and refuses to move.It doe........ Read more »

Belew, A., Barlett, T., & Brown, S. (1999) Evaluation of the White-Coat Effect in Cats. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine, 13(2), 134-142. DOI: 10.1111/j.1939-1676.1999.tb01141.x  

Lockhart, J., Wilson, K., & Lanman, C. (2013) The effects of operant training on blood collection for domestic cats. Applied Animal Behaviour Science, 143(2-4), 128-134. DOI: 10.1016/j.applanim.2012.10.011  

Mariti, C., Raspanti, E., Zilocchi, M., Carlone, B., & Gazzano, A. (2015) The assessment of dog welfare in the waiting room of a veterinary clinic. Animal Welfare, 24(3), 299-305. DOI: 10.7120/09627286.24.3.299  

  • April 6, 2016
  • 07:02 AM
  • 212 views

“The Chocolate Cake Model”: Too much of a  narcissist is a nauseating thing

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Much like the chocolate cake staring at you from the dessert tray in that fine restaurant, the narcissist initially seems irresistible—but like the cake, when you indulge in a relationship with the narcissist, you will probably end up sick to your stomach. It’s called the Chocolate Cake Model of narcissism. And it’s  how today’s researchers […]

Related posts:
So…are you a narcissist? [The Ivy League  edition]
“I am so tired of people mistaking me for a model!” [#humblebr........ Read more »

Ong CW, Roberts R, Arthur CA, Woodman T, & Akehurst S. (2016) The Leader Ship Is Sinking: A Temporal Investigation of Narcissistic Leadership. Journal of Personality, 84(2), 237-47. PMID: 25487857  

  • April 6, 2016
  • 04:09 AM
  • 174 views

It's important to respect the different ways that young women feel after mastectomy

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

One woman said she was proud of herscars – the "war wounds of life".In the UK, nearly 10,000 young women are diagnosed with breast cancer every year and the treatment for many is mastectomy – the surgical removal of one or more of their breasts. It's easy to assume that the effect on their body image will be negative, and UK guidelines currently state that all mastectomy patients should be told about options for reconstructive surgery. However, a key message to emerge from a new survey of yo........ Read more »

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