Post List

Psychology posts

(Modify Search »)

  • September 2, 2010
  • 07:10 AM
  • 855 views

The woman whose new memories are erased each night

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

Psychologists have documented what they believe to be a clinical first - the case of an amnesic woman whose memory for new material is erased each night that she goes to sleep (movie fans will recognise this as a plot device in the 2004 film 50 First Dates). Referred to as case FL, the woman developed these symptoms after she hit her head in a car accident in 2005, aged 48. Brain scans and neurological exams revealed no signs of brain damage, thus suggesting the woman is exhibiting what's known ........ Read more »

Smith, C., Frascino, J., Kripke, D., McHugh, P., Treisman, G., & Squire, L. (2010) Losing memories overnight: A unique form of human amnesia. Neuropsychologia, 48(10), 2833-2840. DOI: 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2010.05.025  

  • September 1, 2010
  • 03:17 PM
  • 1,037 views

Self-Righteousness and Kink: Perfect Together?

by David Berreby in Mind Matters


Props to my colleague Lindsay Beyerstein for this great catch yesterday: Tea Party favorite Sharron Angle's campaign received a donation from someone who listed her employer as "husband" and her occupation as "slave." Maybe it's just a joke (boring). Or maybe this couple is in one of those Christian "submitted wife" relationships (unlikely, given that "slave" isn't the sort of rhetoric that culture promotes). But maybe this is an "out" dominant/submissive couple. That shouldn't be a ........ Read more »

Schnall S, Benton J, & Harvey S. (2008) With a clean conscience: cleanliness reduces the severity of moral judgments. Psychological science : a journal of the American Psychological Society / APS, 19(12), 1219-22. PMID: 19121126  

  • September 1, 2010
  • 02:13 PM
  • 998 views

The Stress Symphony a Prelude to Neurogensis et Stress

by neurobites in Neurobites

Hi there! Been a long time eh? Not sure what happened there, but I blame Harry. Somehow, somewhere he was involved. So let’s just jump right into it Stress. Your reason for not calling your mother, a graduate student’s excuse for overeating, not sleeping, forgetting to hand in an abstract, walking into walls and lying [...]... Read more »

Bruce S. McEwen. (2007) Physiology and Neurobiology of Stress and Adaptation: Central Role of the Brain. Physiological Reviews, 873-904. info:/

  • August 31, 2010
  • 10:18 PM
  • 1,505 views

The Link Between Positive Psychology and Cancer Survival

by Walter Jessen in Highlight HEALTH

The seemingly common idea that a positive outlook will help someone in poor health is currently under scientific investigation. A special supplement of the Annals of Behavioural Medicine directly addressed this topic and a recent article in the Lancet explored the relationship between positive psychology and cancer pathology.... Read more »

Ondicova K, & Mravec B. (2010) Role of nervous system in cancer aetiopathogenesis. The lancet oncology, 11(6), 596-601. PMID: 20522385  

  • August 31, 2010
  • 06:49 PM
  • 646 views

Are you high or low functioning? Examples from autism research

by Michelle Dawson in The Autism Crisis

If you are autistic and ever venture or are pushed into public, a near-certainty is that you will publicly be ranked and classified by total strangers. For example, you will be assigned to the "high end" or the "low end" of the autistic spectrum, according to whether you are claimed to have a good or bad outcome (I've been claimed to have both). Non-political observers may notice how ethically and scientifically problematic this is, but there are few discussions, formal or informal, in which aut........ Read more »

Akshoomoff N, Lord C, Lincoln AJ, Courchesne RY, Carper RA, Townsend J, & Courchesne E. (2004) Outcome classification of preschool children with autism spectrum disorders using MRI brain measures. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 43(3), 349-57. PMID: 15076269  

Farley MA, McMahon WM, Fombonne E, Jenson WR, Miller J, Gardner M, Block H, Pingree CB, Ritvo ER, Ritvo RA.... (2009) Twenty-year outcome for individuals with autism and average or near-average cognitive abilities. Autism research : official journal of the International Society for Autism Research, 2(2), 109-18. PMID: 19455645  

  • August 31, 2010
  • 06:15 PM
  • 393 views

… Sm;)e and whole Frontal Gyrus sm;)es with you

by Rift in Psycasm

[Wherein our hero smiles, and the whole Frontal Gyrus (and parts of the Occiptal Gyrus) smile with him.] Given that I’m leaving the country tomorrow night and I’m cramming some major assignment pre-deadline, I have to keep this post light. Here’s a mind-map a colleague and I put together. It was tiny piece of assessment, [...]... Read more »

  • August 31, 2010
  • 03:58 PM
  • 1,253 views

The Clinical Neuroscience iPad Library

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

Carrying around a library of pdf files has now become easy with the introduction of the iPad and net book computers.  It is now possible to keep a library of key references that can be accessed at the patient bedside for reference use.  This brings up the question of what pdf files are most valuable for clinicians.   I have spent some time thinking about this and elected to come up with a dozen suggestions.  The criteria for selection included:Valuable for clinicians caring ........ Read more »

Davies P, & Koppel J. (2009) Mechanism-based treatments for Alzheimer's disease. Dialogues in clinical neuroscience, 11(2), 159-69. PMID: 19585951  

  • August 31, 2010
  • 03:35 PM
  • 878 views

Measuring changes during graded exposure & acceptance treatment

by Bronwyn Thompson in Healthskills: Skills for Healthy Living

I have been pondering about the best way to monitor ‘Matt’s progress during graded exposure therapy for his avoidance of activities involving back movement. I introduced you to Matt yesterday. He’s a ‘man’s man’, a real bloke who, for the past four years since he had surgery for a prolapsed disc, has avoided things like … Read more... Read more »

  • August 31, 2010
  • 12:17 PM
  • 1,222 views

Wolves Are Smart, but Dogs Look Back

by Jason Goldman in The Thoughtful Animal



Dogs are pretty smart. They can have huge vocabularies, they can infer meaning in the growls of other dogs, and they can effortlessly figure out if other dogs want to play or fight with them. But their intelligence might be limited to the social domain; indeed, while they outperform chimpanzees in social tasks, chimpanzees outperform them in many other tasks. And they might have developed their impressive social skills as merely an accident of natural and artificial selection.

Previous resear........ Read more »

Miklósi A, Kubinyi E, Topál J, Gácsi M, Virányi Z, & Csányi V. (2003) A simple reason for a big difference: wolves do not look back at humans, but dogs do. Current biology : CB, 13(9), 763-6. PMID: 12725735  

  • August 31, 2010
  • 12:08 PM
  • 419 views

We recognize siblings based solely on facial similarity

by Psychology 379 bloggers in Cognition & the Arts

Originally posted on Cognitive Daily. This is a guest post by Christy Tucker, one of Greta’s top student writers from Spring of 2007. Take a look at the following paintings. How alike are they? How can you tell–which clues help you determine similarity? Now, which of these girls are related? If only two of these [...]... Read more »

  • August 31, 2010
  • 12:07 PM
  • 452 views

The Magic Touch: When vision lets you down

by Psychology 379 bloggers in Cognition & the Arts

Originally posted on Cognitive Daily. This is a guest post by Martina Mustroph, one of Greta’s top student writers for Spring 2007. When you’re typing, your senses of touch, hearing, and sight align. You feel, see, and hear your fingers touch the keyboard. Now imagine that you are outdoors and you feel a drop of [...]... Read more »

  • August 31, 2010
  • 12:04 PM
  • 444 views

Other-race faces: Why do they seem different?

by Psychology 379 bloggers in Cognition & the Arts

Originally posted on Cognitive Daily. This is a guest post by Rivka Ihejirika, one of Greta’s top student writers for Spring 2007 Do you find it harder to recognize the face of someone from a race other than your own? Does it take you longer to recall the face of someone from an unfamiliar race? [...]... Read more »

Bar-Haim Y, Ziv T, Lamy D, & Hodes RM. (2006) Nature and nurture in own-race face processing. Psychological science : a journal of the American Psychological Society / APS, 17(2), 159-63. PMID: 16466424  

  • August 31, 2010
  • 12:02 PM
  • 470 views

Synesthesia more prevalent than originally thought

by Psychology 379 bloggers in Cognition & the Arts

Originally posted on Cognitive Daily. This is a guest post by Jonathan Leathers, one of Greta’s top student writers for Spring 2007. Take a look at this word: MONDAY What color do you see? Red? Blue? While you may see nothing unusual, some people report being able to perceive colors associated with different days of [...]... Read more »

Simner J, Mulvenna C, Sagiv N, Tsakanikos E, Witherby SA, Fraser C, Scott K, & Ward J. (2006) Synaesthesia: the prevalence of atypical cross-modal experiences. Perception, 35(8), 1024-33. PMID: 17076063  

  • August 31, 2010
  • 11:56 AM
  • 1,489 views

Human GPS: Some of us are better equipped than others

by Psychology 379 bloggers in Cognition & the Arts

Originally posted on Cognitive Daily. This is a guest post by Dan Griffin, one of Greta’s top student writers for Spring 2007 How well do you think you can navigate through these woods? How about when your field of view is significantly reduced? When external information such as sight is decreased, our ability to make [...]... Read more »

Fortenbaugh FC, Hicks JC, Hao L, & Turano KA. (2006) High-speed navigators: Using more than what meets the eye. Journal of vision, 6(5), 565-79. PMID: 16881789  

  • August 31, 2010
  • 11:49 AM
  • 424 views

This side up: Perceiving visual orientation

by Psychology 379 bloggers in Cognition & the Arts

Originally posted on Cognitive Daily. This is a guest post by Aaron Couch, one of Greta’s top student writers for Spring 2007 When looking out a window, or watching a movie in a theater, the image you see is typically presented as right-side-up. Let’s say though, that you’re lying on your side in bed and [...]... Read more »

Howard IP, Hu G, Saxe R, & James EZ. (2005) Visual orientation in a mirror world tilted 90 degrees. Perception, 34(1), 7-15. PMID: 15773603  

  • August 31, 2010
  • 11:14 AM
  • 789 views

Rewriting Masculine Gender Scripts...

by Ultimo167 in Strong Silent Types

Gast and Peak (2010) think that 'masculine gender scripts' seriously frustrate men from seeking help for their health problems. ... Read more »

  • August 31, 2010
  • 05:00 AM
  • 812 views

How good are we at estimating other people's drunkenness?

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest

Sloshed, trollied, hammered, plastered. We've done a sterling job of inventing words for the inebriated state, but when it comes to judging from their behaviour how much a person has drunk, we could do (a lot) better. That's according to a review of the literature by US psychologist Steve Rubenzer.

We all have our trusted indices for judging other people's drunkenness. Perhaps it's when the eyeballs start floating about as if under the control of a clumsy puppeteer. Or maybe the effusive 'you k........ Read more »

Rubenzer, S. (2010) Judging intoxication. Behavioral Sciences . DOI: 10.1002/bsl.935  

  • August 30, 2010
  • 06:33 PM
  • 835 views

"Moving Through Time" and embodied cognition

by Andrew Wilson in Notes from Two Scientific Psychologists

The term 'embodied cognition' gets used in many different ways in psychology. One problematic way is to look for subtle effects of cognition on behaviour that somehow mirror what the researcher believes is the structure in the cognitive act. Case in point: "Moving Through Time".... Read more »

Miles, L., Nind, L., Macrae, C. (2010) Moving Through Time. Psychological Science, 21(2), 222-223. DOI: 10.1177/0956797609359333  

  • August 30, 2010
  • 01:01 PM
  • 550 views

Serotonin, Psychedelics and Depression

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic

Note: This post is part of a Nature Blog Focus on hallucinogenic drugs in medicine and mental health, inspired by a recent Nature Reviews Neuroscience paper, The neurobiology of psychedelic drugs: implications for the treatment of mood disorders, by Franz Vollenweider & Michael Kometer. That article will be available, open-access, until September 23. For more information on this Blog Focus, including a Table of Contents, please visit The Great Beyond.Neurophilosophy is covering the history o........ Read more »

  • August 30, 2010
  • 12:58 PM
  • 1,009 views

Ketamine for Depression: Yay or Neigh?

by The Neurocritic in The Neurocritic

Venn diagram of psychoactive drugs [click for larger image]This post is part of a Nature Blog Focus on hallucinogenic drugs in medicine and mental health, inspired by a recent Nature Reviews Neuroscience paper, The neurobiology of psychedelic drugs: implications for the treatment of mood disorders, by Franz Vollenweider & Michael Kometer. This article will be available, open-access, until September 23. For more information on this Blog Focus, including a Table of Contents, please visit Th........ Read more »

join us!

Do you write about peer-reviewed research in your blog? Use ResearchBlogging.org to make it easy for your readers — and others from around the world — to find your serious posts about academic research.

If you don't have a blog, you can still use our site to learn about fascinating developments in cutting-edge research from around the world.

Register Now

Research Blogging is powered by SMG Technology.

To learn more, visit seedmediagroup.com.