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  • October 31, 2011
  • 04:15 PM
  • 801 views

Things that might’ve happened to you during Halloween weekend

by NerdyOne in Try Nerdy

Happy Halloween, Nerds! With Halloween falling on a Monday this year, my guess is that many of you did your Halloween partying some time over the past few days. Maybe you had an awesome costume that you spent months planning, or maybe you threw on a black turtleneck at the last minute and called yourself Steve Jobs (too soon?). Either way, I think there’s a high probability that you enjoyed some candy, and perhaps an alcoholic beverage or two (three, four, five…). Am I right? (Unles........ Read more »

  • October 31, 2011
  • 03:10 PM
  • 766 views

What do Halloween and Social Psychology have in common? Deindividuation, of course

by Psych Your Mind in Psych Your Mind

As the children take to the streets tonight in search of a
trick-or-treat, you might be wondering the best way to protect your house from
some heavy candy-looting. In 1976, Ed
Diener and his colleagues asked a similar question, though they were more
interested in the conditions that prompted trick-or-treaters to overindulge and
take more than they should. Halloween is a holiday which encourages people to
dress up in costumes and roam the streets in large groups - the perfect recipe
for de........ Read more »

Diener, E., Fraser, S., Beaman, A., & Kelem, R. (1976) Effects of deindividuation variables on stealing among Halloween trick-or-treaters. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 33(2), 178-183. DOI: 10.1037/0022-3514.33.2.178  

  • October 31, 2011
  • 03:02 PM
  • 863 views

Real Life Werewolves? Dog Bites and Full Moons

by Jason Goldman in The Thoughtful Animal

Happy Halloween! I decided to revise and repost this piece from November 1, 2010, on dog bites, full moons, and confirmation bias. Click the archives icon to see the original post. Our story begins in March 2000, when Dr. Simon Chapman and colleagues from the University of Sydney published a paper in which they assessed [...]









... Read more »

Chapman S, & Morrell S. (2000) Barking mad? another lunatic hypothesis bites the dust. BMJ (Clinical research ed.), 321(7276), 1561-3. PMID: 11124174  

  • October 31, 2011
  • 11:23 AM
  • 833 views

Stuck on your ideas: fixation in group brainstorms

by Alex Fradera in BPS Occupational Digest

Brainstorming, when people gather to generate ideas together, is great in theory: many perspectives mesh to generate diverse outputs. In practice, evidence shows that brainstorming groups often perform more poorly than an equivalent number of soloists (often called a 'nominal' group). Some reasons are social, such as a pressure not to offer wild ideas in public; these can be mitigated by changing norms or tweaking process, e.g. sharing ideas anonymously using computers. A recent article focuses ........ Read more »

  • October 31, 2011
  • 09:17 AM
  • 1,262 views

Harlow’s pit of despair for baby monkeys

by United Academics in United Academics

Psychology in the ’50s was not exactly a the goat-wool socks level it is nowadays. Back then issues such as conformity, obedience and power were examined. Scientist Harry Harlow, hippie avant le lettre, would have none of it. He believed in something else: the power of love.... Read more »

  • October 31, 2011
  • 08:27 AM
  • 879 views

When Are People Willing to Deceive Others?

by Eric Horowitz in peer-reviewed by my neurons

One of the more interesting psychological elements of the financial crisis is how the public characterizes people like Bernie Madoff or the Wall Street “geniuses” who sold billions worth of retranched junk CLOs labeled as AAA bonds. People often describe them as “bad” or “evil”, but I think this tends to downplay influential environmental factors. [...]... Read more »

Shalvi, S., Handgraaf, M., & De Dreu, C. (2011) People avoid situations that enable them to deceive others. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 47(6), 1096-1106. DOI: 10.1016/j.jesp.2011.04.015  

  • October 31, 2011
  • 07:02 AM
  • 1,365 views

Is that a psychopath trying to kill you? Are you listening?

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

It would be nice to know how to identify a psychopath. For instance, if they all wore Hannibal Lecter face masks, it’d be much easier. Mostly, they aren’t so cooperative until it’s a bit too late. But there is hope. New research compares how psychopathic murderers and “regular murderers” talk.  [Okay-- show of hands, please-- [...]


Related posts:Neurolaw Update: Who’s in charge here—me or my brain?
Okay, wait! Which one of you was I listening to?
Crime and meanness: We know whos........ Read more »

Hancock, JT, Woodworth, MT, & Porter, S. (2011) Hungry like the wolf: A word-pattern analysis of the language of psychopaths. Legal and Criminological Psychology. info:/

  • October 31, 2011
  • 03:45 AM
  • 965 views

Buried Alive!

by The Neurocritic in The Neurocritic

The pathological fear of being buried alive is called taphophobia1 [from the Greek taphos, or grave]. Being buried alive seems like a fate worse than death, the stuff of nightmares and horror movies and Edgar Allan Poe short stories. What could be pathological about such a fear? When taken to extremes, it can become a morbid, all-consuming obsession. In 1881, psychiatrist Enrico Morselli wrote about "two hitherto undescribed forms of Insanity" (English translation, 2001):As the result of some ob........ Read more »

  • October 29, 2011
  • 02:51 AM
  • 869 views

Good Politicians Are Bad at Running the Country

by Eric Horowitz in peer-reviewed by my neurons

It you want to be more than a state level politicians, you need to be really good at fundraising, public speaking, and smiling into a camera. Unfortunately, those abilities don’t make you better at running the country, and that mismatch between the skills needed to get the job and the skills needed to do the [...]... Read more »

Nevicka B, Ten Velden FS, De Hoogh AH, & Van Vianen AE. (2011) Reality at odds with perceptions: narcissistic leaders and group performance. Psychological science, 22(10), 1259-64. PMID: 21931153  

  • October 28, 2011
  • 08:48 PM
  • 433 views

Is marriage losing importance around the world? The changing face of marriage in Asia

by eHarmony Labs in eHarmony Labs Blog

From all the way around the world, marriage is changing and becoming less important. But for different reasons in Asian than Western countries. Here are a few interesting research findings about marriage in Asia.... Read more »

  • October 28, 2011
  • 04:20 PM
  • 1,777 views

Why Don't Woodpeckers Get Concussions?

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish

To help protect our big, fragile brains from trauma during sports, why not turn to another animal that voluntarily smashes its skull into solid objects? The woodpecker hammers its beak into tree trunks twelve thousand times a day at at fifteen miles an hour. In so doing, it drills out nests, finds tasty bugs, and does not (as far as one can tell) give itself brain damage. What's its secret?

Lizhen Wang at Beihang University in Beijing led a study to find out what makes the woodpecker so resilie........ Read more »

  • October 28, 2011
  • 01:19 PM
  • 805 views

Improving memory - (retrieval) practice makes perfect

by Psych Your Mind in Psych Your Mind

Today we would like to present you with the another (terrific) guest blogger. Joseph Williams is a graduate student in the cognitive psychology program at UC-Berkeley. Enjoy!



source

You’re about to read a 200-word science passage on sea otters so that you can successfully answer questions about it in a week’s time. What strategies would you use to study it? Which of these options would you choose? (a) reading it four times, (b) drawing out a concept map of all the key ideas, or (c) rea........ Read more »

  • October 28, 2011
  • 08:31 AM
  • 1,121 views

It’s healthy to believe

by United Academics in United Academics

If you suffer from a chronic illness it might be wise to say a little prayer from time to time, scientists from the University of Missouri report in a new study.... Read more »

Reid-Arndt, S.A., Smith, M., Yoon, D.P., & Johnstone, B. (2011) Gender Differences in Spiritual Experiences, Religious Practices, and Congregational Support for Individuals with Significant Health Conditions. Journal of Religion, Disability, and Health. info:/

  • October 28, 2011
  • 07:42 AM
  • 907 views

People Are More Likley to Lie When Communicating Online

by Eric Horowitz in peer-reviewed by my neurons

Did that “young successful entrepreneur” you met on e-Harmony turn out to be a 40-year-old American Idol memorabilia salesman? Sorry, science can’t explain your inability to properly screen people. However, for those who often come across less intentional online exaggerations of the truth, new research does shows that communicating online increases the propensity to be [...]... Read more »

  • October 28, 2011
  • 07:30 AM
  • 1,229 views

It’s healthy to believe

by Gijs van der Klei in UA

If you suffer from a chronic illness it might be wise to say a little prayer from time to time, scientists from the University of Missouri report in a new study. Using a survey, they found that believers or people who are spiritually oriented that suffer from a chronic disease, identify themselves as physically and [...]... Read more »

Reid-Arndt, S.A., Smith, M., Yoon, D.P., & Johnstone, B. (2011) Gender Differences in Spiritual Experiences, Religious Practices, and Congregational Support for Individuals with Significant Health Conditions. Journal of Religion, Disability, and Health. info:/

  • October 28, 2011
  • 07:02 AM
  • 830 views

Simple Jury Persuasion: “I transgressed. Please forgive me.”

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

Oh, would that it were so easy. The issue of apology and litigation has been written and talked about for years. It’s a good thing. It’s a bad thing. There are no shortage of opinions. But the salient issue is the repair of trust. And now, we have some international studies on how the audience perceives [...]


Related posts:Simple Jury Persuasion: Human flaws bind us all
Simple Jury Persuasion: Keep them from going with the immoral flow!
Simple Jury Persuasion: Use pre-factual thinking to ........ Read more »

Kurt T. Dirks, Peter H. Kim, Donald L. Ferrin, & Cecily D. Cooper. (2011) Understanding the effects of substantive responses on trust following a transgression. . Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 87-103. info:/

  • October 27, 2011
  • 05:23 PM
  • 989 views

Your Homunculus Is A Liar

by Cris Campbell in Genealogy of Religion

The person who lives inside your head may seem rational and honest, but who is fooling who? If you are fortunate there is only one voice and if you are sober the voice should be sensible. Or so we would like to think. Two recent studies suggest otherwise. As it turns out, our homunculi are [...]... Read more »

von Hippel, W., & Trivers, R. (2011) The evolution and psychology of self-deception. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 34(01), 1-16. DOI: 10.1017/S0140525X10001354  

Sharot, T., Korn, C., & Dolan, R. (2011) How unrealistic optimism is maintained in the face of reality. Nature Neuroscience, 14(11), 1475-1479. DOI: 10.1038/nn.2949  

  • October 27, 2011
  • 11:50 AM
  • 486 views

Yes, Virginia, There is a CSI Effect: Account for It in Your Science Case

by Persuasion Strategies in Persuasive Litigator

By Dr. Ken Broda-Bahm: The news media pounced on it, but the scholars said it didn't exist. The "CSI Effect," or the tendency for high technology crime dramas to fuel a juror expectation for sophisticated investigations and definite answers, entered the popular and media imagination as a powerful effect that could stymie prosecution (by creating unrealistic evidentiary burdens) or hamper the defense (by conveying the illusion of certainty). However, even as anecdotes abound, the research has fai........ Read more »

Smith, Lisa L. . (2011) Identifying and measuring juror pre-trial bias for forensic evidence: development and validation of the Forensic Evidence Evaluation Bias Scale. Psychology, Crime . info:/10.1080/1068316X.2011.561800

  • October 27, 2011
  • 09:27 AM
  • 855 views

Women peak too soon during sex

by United Academics in United Academics

Most people believe the premature orgasm to be a typical male problem. Women on the other hand are often expected to have difficulties reaching their peak. However, a new study shows that women too can come too fast, sometimes even as often as men. The study was conducted by researcher Serafim Carvalho and his colleagues at the Hospital Magalhães Lemos in Portugal.... Read more »

S. Carvalho, A. Moreira, M. Rosado, D. Correia, D. Maia, & P. Pimentel. (2011) Female premature orgasm: Does this exist?. Sexologies. info:/

  • October 27, 2011
  • 09:11 AM
  • 785 views

Women peak too soon during sex

by Gijs van der Klei in UA

Most people believe the premature orgasm to be a typical male problem. Women on the other hand are often expected to have difficulties reaching their peak. However, a new study shows that women too can come too fast, sometimes even as often as men. The study was conducted by researcher Serafim Carvalho and his colleagues [...]... Read more »

S. Carvalho, A. Moreira, M. Rosado, D. Correia, D. Maia, & P. Pimentel. (2011) Female premature orgasm: Does this exist?. Sexologies. info:/

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