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  • December 23, 2011
  • 01:23 PM
  • 1,146 views

Kids Learn to Speak by Not Listening

by Elizabeth Preston in Inkfish

Getting dressed in the dark is generally considered a bad idea. When presenting ourselves to the outside world, we like to have some visual feedback so we know what other people are seeing. Likewise, as young children learning to talk, we rely on auditory feedback--we need to hear ourselves speak. We continue to use this feedback, and adjust our talking accordingly, even as fully fluent adults. But at a certain stage of development, we may learn by not listening to ourselves at all.

Researchers........ Read more »

MacDonald, E., Johnson, E., Forsythe, J., Plante, P., & Munhall, K. (2011) Children's Development of Self-Regulation in Speech Production. Current Biology. DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2011.11.052  

  • December 23, 2011
  • 12:00 PM
  • 1,380 views

People sexually imprint on parents?

by sahelanthropus in EvoAnth

An analysis of a recent article suggesting people sexually imprint on their parents, seeking out spouses similar to them. ... Read more »

  • December 23, 2011
  • 07:02 AM
  • 775 views

Simple Jury Persuasion: The innuendo effect

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

“I know that’s what he said, but this is what he really meant…!” From early sibling conflicts and on into adulthood, we know the power of innuendo. Now we have academic research findings that corroborate that childhood experience (especially for women). Researchers were curious about how hearing only positive information might still be construed negatively by [...]
No related posts.... Read more »

Kervyn, N., Bergsieker, H., & Fiske, S. (2012) The innuendo effect: Hearing the positive but inferring the negative. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 77-85. info:/

  • December 22, 2011
  • 04:52 PM
  • 736 views

How our collective memory of 1066 could be souring Anglo-French relations

by BPS Research Digest in BPS Research Digest



Anglo-Saxon troops confront the invaders

No doubt you've noticed that the Entente Cordiale has been looking a little strained lately. That's mostly due to contemporary European politics and economics. Isn't it? We can't blame 1066. Can we?

In fact, British attitudes towards the French today probably aren't helped by memories and myths surrounding the Norman Conquest. This may seem like an odd claim, but a timely and intriguing new study focuses on the Norman Conquest of B........ Read more »

  • December 22, 2011
  • 11:39 AM
  • 546 views

Don't Be Faceless

by Persuasion Strategies in Persuasive Litigator

Speaking of faces, it turns out that Facebook is planning to sue Mark Zuckerberg. No, not that Mark Zuckerberg, the iconic founder of the world's social media homepage, but an Israeli businessman, formerly named Rotem Guez, who legally changed his name to Mark Zuckerberg in order to support a business that can only make sense in today's ephemeral market: selling "likes" to companies who, you know, want to feel more "liked" in their online presence. Facebook itself might even fit in that categ........ Read more »

Waytz, Adam; Young, Liane. (2011) The Group-Member Mind Tradeoff: Attributing Mind to Groups versus Group Members. Psychological Science. info:/

  • December 22, 2011
  • 10:30 AM
  • 909 views

Cricket Fight Club: Winning Increases Aggression

by Jason Goldman in The Thoughtful Animal

It’s better than an ant farm. It’s more exciting than a flea circus. Welcome to Cricket Fight Club. The first rule of Cricket Fight Club is: you do not talk about Cricket Fight Club. The second rule of Cricket Fight Club is: you do not talk about Cricket Fight Club. In aggressive conflicts between individuals [...]









... Read more »

  • December 22, 2011
  • 05:20 AM
  • 808 views

An Objective Measure of Consciousness...?

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic

Could a puff of air in the eye offer a way to evaluate whether someone is conscious or not?Yes it could, say Cambridge's Tristan Bekinschtein and colleagues in a new paper about Sea slugs, subliminal pictures, and vegetative state patients.It's all about classical conditioning of the kind made famous by Pavlov. This is learning caused by the pairing of two stimuli, one of them unpleasant. So if I were to ring a little bell before, say, pepper spraying you, and I did that repeatedly, you would pr........ Read more »

  • December 22, 2011
  • 12:14 AM
  • 846 views

78% of North Koreans Think I’m Right

by Eric Horowitz in peer-reviewed by my neurons

Do you know anybody who’s a Rick Santorum supporter? Is he/she obnoxiously confident the polls will move in Santorum’s direction once his message spreads? That soon nothing will stop him from ensuring society once again has values? If you do, don’t look down on them because they have a comically unrealistic sense of the political landscape, simply look down on them because they’ve fallen victim to the psychological tendency to assume people you know nothing about agree with you.... Read more »

Koudenburg, N., Postmes, T., & Gordijn, E. (2011) If They Were to Vote, They Would Vote for Us. Psychological Science, 22(12), 1506-1510. DOI: 10.1177/0956797611420164  

  • December 21, 2011
  • 11:04 PM
  • 8,013 views

Why Do We Say “I’m Not Sick” When We’re Really Sick?

by Krystal D'Costa in Anthropology in Practice

It’s everyone’s favorite time of year: cold and flu season! I dutifully got my flu shot in October, so when my throat started to tickle a few weeks ago, I dismissed it as a passing bug. Bad idea: It turned into an epic cold that nearly shut me down. (I may have also shared this [...]









... Read more »

Segall, A. (1976) The Sick Role Concept: Understanding Illness Behavior. Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 17(2), 162. DOI: 10.2307/2136342  

Vuckovic N. (1999) Fast relief: buying time with medications. Medical Anthropology Quarterly, 13(1), 51-68. PMID: 10322601  

Wolinsky, F., & Wolinsky, S. (1981) Expecting Sick-Role Legitimation and Getting It. Journal of Health and Social Behavior, 22(3), 229. DOI: 10.2307/2136518  

  • December 21, 2011
  • 09:12 PM
  • 1,051 views

Ironic: Anti-Prejudice Experiments Show that Our Efforts are Making Things Worse

by DJ Busby in Astronasty

A brilliant and game changing set of experiments on anti-prejudice efforts has been released in the Journal Psychological Science. The hypothesis, which proved to stand up, said that self-motivated reasoning provides a greater influence against prejudice than a "controlled" approach, pressure exerted from outside sources.... Read more »

  • December 21, 2011
  • 01:12 PM
  • 1,180 views

Rich People Hate Debt, Poor People Hate Not Having Stuff

by Eric Horowitz in peer-reviewed by my neurons

Nearly everybody has taken some blame for the slow economy — Democrats, Republicans, Goldman Sachs, Freddie Mac, Easy Mac, EasyJet, Benny and the Jets, etc.  Human psychology is also a big culprit, and a new study by two Princeton researchers on perceptions of wealth adds another reason why our brains are to blame. The researchers asked subjects [...]... Read more »

  • December 21, 2011
  • 08:00 AM
  • 1,067 views

Which reads faster, Chinese or English?

by Tim De Chant in Per Square Mile

If there’s one thing that can dazzle my Western eyes, it’s the main drag of any Taiwanese town. On my recent trip to Taiwan, I saw billboards and signs for local shops that dripped from buildings with so many hues Benjamin Moore would blush. Once my mind had adjusted to the mishmash of colors, I [...]... Read more »

Sun, F, & Feng, D. (2010) Eye movements in reading Chinese and English text. Reading Chinese Script: A cognitive analysis, Eds. Jian Wang, Albrecht W. Inhoff, Hsuan-Chih Chen., 189-205. info:other/9780805824780

  • December 21, 2011
  • 08:00 AM
  • 472 views

℗ Which reads faster, Chinese or English?

by Tim De Chant in Per Square Mile

If there’s one thing that can dazzle my Western eyes, it’s the main drag of any Taiwanese town. On my recent trip to Taiwan, I saw billboards and signs for local shops that dripped from buildings with so many hues Benjamin Moore would blush. Once my mind had adjusted to the mishmash of colors, I [...]... Read more »

Sun, F, & Feng, D. (2010) Eye movements in reading Chinese and English text. Reading Chinese Script: A cognitive analysis, Eds. Jian Wang, Albrecht W. Inhoff, Hsuan-Chih Chen., 189-205. info:other/9780805824780

  • December 21, 2011
  • 07:02 AM
  • 972 views

If your jurors are happy, will they blame the victim less?

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

This is research that flies in the face of the common wisdom that angry jurors award more damages. It is a long-standing tenet of the research literature that when bad things happen to good people we tend to paradoxically blame the victim. It helps us feel safer to believe the harmed party “must have” done [...]
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A long tall Texan (and an auto repair shop tale)
... Read more »

Goldenberg, L., & Forgas, J. (2012) Can happy mood reduce the just world bias? Affective influences on blaming the victim. . Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 239-243. info:/

  • December 21, 2011
  • 03:39 AM
  • 1,043 views

Modern Day Freudian Slips

by Psych Your Mind in Psych Your Mind

George H. W. Bush once made the following classic Freudian slip in a public speech: "For seven and a half years I've worked alongside President Reagan, and I'm proud to have been his partner. We've had triumphs. We've made some mistakes. We've had some sex -- setbacks." When the audience erupts in laughter, you can't help but feel a little bad for the guy, who appears to have a minor heart-attack if you watch his chest closely (see the video here). Rather than revealing that Bush unconsciously w........ Read more »

  • December 20, 2011
  • 03:35 PM
  • 1,331 views

Creation Myths: Not Just Stories

by Cris Campbell in Genealogy of Religion

Over the past few weeks I’ve been thinking about creation myths. By calling them “myths” it allows us to overlook, dismiss, or ignore them. This is a mistake. We should think hard about what these myths do and how they work. They are not just quaint relics of a pre-scientific past. They are not just [...]... Read more »

Lewin, Roger. (1988) Man's Place in Nature. The Missouri Review, 11(3), 16-32. info:/

  • December 20, 2011
  • 03:30 PM
  • 460 views

How your attractiveness affects your perception of others

by eHarmony Labs in eHarmony Labs Blog

Have you ever been to a bar or other social hangout and been approached by someone who just doesn’t get the hint that you’re not interested? Conversely, have you felt that that you were doing everything you can to send an “ask-me-for-my-number” signal to no avail? Why do we have such difficulty in accurately reading sexual cues from others? ... Read more »

  • December 20, 2011
  • 10:44 AM
  • 844 views

What Attracts Us to Power?

by Eric Horowitz in peer-reviewed by my neurons

Uncle Ben may have seemed like an over-zealous advice-giving old kook when he harped to Spiderman that ”with great power comes great responsibility,” but now there is some science hinting at the wisdom of his words. According to a new study, people are much more attracted to power when they construe it as opportunity rather than [...]... Read more »

  • December 20, 2011
  • 07:48 AM
  • 721 views

Does a man's facial dimensions influence his leadership performance?

by Alex Fradera in BPS Occupational Digest

You might notice thatmany studies we cover rely on survey rating data. This reflects thefield's research focus and its desire for 'ecological validity' -examining real-world contexts rather than simplified laboratoryset-ups. Nonetheless, as someone with a heterodox psychologybackground, I find it heartening when studies choose more imaginativemeasures.Here's a great example,entirely rating-free: a study that evaluates whether male CEOappearance affects company performance by actually measuring C........ Read more »

  • December 20, 2011
  • 01:04 AM
  • 1,271 views

Who Benefits from Serious Gaming?

by Dr Shock in Dr Shock MD PhD

Buffer Multimodality or using a combination of visual, auditory, haptic,and other sensory modalities in the presentation of knowledge in serious gaming improves learning outcome. Interactivity or the communication between player and the digital gaming system in serious gaming also improves learning outcome. But these are two design elements and not psychological attributes of users of [...]
No related posts.... Read more »

Lee, Y., Heeter, C., Magerko, B., & Medler, B. (2011) Gaming Mindsets: Implicit Theories in Serious Game Learning. Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, 2147483647. DOI: 10.1089/cyber.2011.0328  

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