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  • January 12, 2011
  • 06:50 PM
  • 1,032 views

Dialects in Tweets

by Richard in A Replicated Typo 2.0

A recent study published in the proceedings of the Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing Conference (EMNLP) in October and presented in the LSA conference last week found evidence of geographical lexical variation in Twitter posts. (For news stories on it, see here and here.) Eisenstein, O’Connor, Smith and Xing took a batch of Twitter posts from a . . . → Read More: Dialects in Tweets... Read more »

Jacob Eisenstein, Brendan O'Connor, Noah A. Smith, & Eric P. Xing. (2010) A Latent Variable Model for Geographic Lexical Variation. . Proceedings of EMNLP. info:/

  • January 12, 2011
  • 03:25 PM
  • 1,024 views

Body Mass Index and Physical Attractiveness: Evidence From a Combination Image-Alteration/List Experiment

by Christopher Winship in SMR Blog

Conley, D., & McCabe, B. (2011). Body Mass Index and Physical Attractiveness: Evidence From a Combination Image-Alteration/List Experiment, Sociological Methods & Research, 40 (1), 6-31 DOI: 10.1177/0049124110390762 Featured article: Available to download free of charge via Sage Publications until 6/1/2011. Abstract & References, View Supplemental Data Dalton Conley, New York University, New York, NY, USA, conley@nyu.edu Filed under: post [...]... Read more »

  • January 12, 2011
  • 03:15 PM
  • 1,145 views

Nonparametric Tests of Panel Conditioning and Attrition Bias in Panel Surveys

by Christopher Winship in SMR Blog

Das, M., Toepoel, V., & van Soest, A. (2011). Nonparametric Tests of Panel Conditioning and Attrition Bias in Panel Surveys, Sociological Methods & Research, 40 (1), 32-56 DOI: 10.1177/0049124110390765, view abstract. Filed under: post Tagged: attrition bias, measurement error, panel conditioning, panel surveys... Read more »

  • January 12, 2011
  • 03:06 PM
  • 626 views

Two Algorithms for Relaxed Structural Balance Partitioning: Linking Theory, Models, and Data to Understand Social Network Phenomena

by Christopher Winship in SMR Blog

Brusco, M., Doreian, P., Mrvar, A., & Steinley, D. (2010). Two Algorithms for Relaxed Structural Balance Partitioning: Linking Theory, Models, and Data to Understand Social Network Phenomena, Sociological Methods & Research, 40 (1), 57-87 DOI: 10.1177/0049124110384947, view abstract. Filed under: post Tagged: algorithms, blockmodeling, relaxed structural balance, signed networks... Read more »

  • January 12, 2011
  • 03:04 PM
  • 664 views

The Effects of Asking Filter Questions in Interleafed Versus Grouped Format

by Christopher Winship in SMR Blog

Kreuter, F., McCulloch, S., Presser, S., & Tourangeau, R. (2011). The Effects of Asking Filter Questions in Interleafed Versus Grouped Format Sociological Methods & Research, 40 (1), 88-104 DOI: 10.1177/0049124110392342, view abstract. Filed under: post Tagged: filter questions, questionnaire design, respondent behavior, response burden... Read more »

Kreuter, F., McCulloch, S., Presser, S., & Tourangeau, R. (2011) The Effects of Asking Filter Questions in Interleafed Versus Grouped Format. Sociological Methods , 40(1), 88-104. DOI: 10.1177/0049124110392342  

  • January 12, 2011
  • 03:01 PM
  • 626 views

Estimating Propensity Adjustments for Volunteer Web Surveys

by Christopher Winship in SMR Blog

Valliant, R., & Dever, J. (2011). Estimating Propensity Adjustments for Volunteer Web Surveys Sociological Methods & Research, 40 (1), 105-137 DOI: 10.1177/0049124110392533, view abstract. Filed under: post Tagged: calibration estimator, logistic regression, nonignorable selection, propensity model, reference survey, web survey... Read more »

  • January 12, 2011
  • 02:48 PM
  • 643 views

Multiple Sources of Nonobservation Error in Telephone Surveys: Coverage and Nonresponse

by Christopher Winship in SMR Blog

Peytchev, A., Carley-Baxter, L., & Black, M. (2011). Multiple Sources of Nonobservation Error in Telephone Surveys: Coverage and Nonresponse Sociological Methods & Research, 40 (1), 138-168 DOI: 10.1177/0049124110392547, view abstract. Filed under: post Tagged: cell phone, coverage bias, dual frame, nonresponse bias, two phase, weighting adjustments... Read more »

  • January 12, 2011
  • 02:24 PM
  • 889 views

Sensitive Questions in Online Surveys: Experimental Results for the Randomized Response Technique (RRT) and the Unmatched Count Technique (UCT)

by Christopher Winship in SMR Blog

Coutts, E., & Jann, B. (2011). Sensitive Questions in Online Surveys: Experimental Results for the Randomized Response Technique (RRT) and the Unmatched Count Technique (UCT) Sociological Methods & Research, 40 (1), 169-193 DOI: 10.1177/0049124110390768, view abstract. Filed under: post Tagged: item count technique, methodological experiment, online survey, randomized response technique, sensitive questions, unmatched count technique... Read more »

  • January 12, 2011
  • 07:02 AM
  • 759 views

Voir Dire Tip: Are you ‘transported’ by a good story?

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

As a kid, I loved a good story, especially scary or suspenseful ones. And I still do. It’s just that now I tend to listen to them on my iPod while driving or flying across the country.  As a trial consultant, it’s part of the job to help craft a case narrative into a really good [...]


Related posts:The story of the numbers behind the story
You’re not too old for a story (but you might be too young!)
Voir dire lesson: “I don’t believe everything I hear”
... Read more »

Mazzocco, PJ, Green, MC, Sasota, JA, & Jones, NW. (2010) This story is not for everyone: Transportability and Narrative Persuasion. . Social Psychological and Personality Science, 1(4), 361-368. info:/

  • January 12, 2011
  • 06:44 AM
  • 1,338 views

The speed of cities, part II

by Jason Collins in Evolving Economics

As I described in my last post, there is a strong relationship between the size of cities and the residents’ speed of walking. The larger the city, the quicker its residents scamper from A to B. A number of studies have confirmed this relationship and have broadened the relationship to the speed of other activities [...]... Read more »

Levine, R., & Norenzayan, A. (1999) The Pace of Life in 31 Countries. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 30(2), 178-205. DOI: 10.1177/0022022199030002003  

  • January 12, 2011
  • 02:00 AM
  • 521 views

Links between alcohol consumption, our perception of others and increased levels of aggression

by SAGE Insight in SAGE Insight

Effects of acute alcohol consumption on the perception of eye gaze direction From Journal of Psychopharmacology This article explores the link between alcohol and increased aggression by assessing differences in how people look at others. The study uses a gaze perception task to monitor the response of participants to stimulus faces to gauge if they [...]... Read more »

Penton-Voak, I., Cooper, R., Roberts, R., Attwood, A., & Munafo, M. (2010) Effects of acute alcohol consumption on the perception of eye gaze direction. Journal of Psychopharmacology. DOI: 10.1177/0269881110385599  

  • January 11, 2011
  • 03:40 PM
  • 1,323 views

The Statistical Mechanics of Money

by Joseph Smidt in The Eternal Universe

Yesterday I listened to a talk by Victor Yakovenko of the University of Maryland about the physics of money and it was quite interesting. I think that after this talk I am finally beginning to understand economics while at the same time I suspect that most economists don't.

In his talk he said that back in 2000 he published a paper on how to apply statistical mechanics to free market economics.... Read more »

XI, N., DING, N., & WANG, Y. (2005) How required reserve ratio affects distribution and velocity of money☆. Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, 357(3-4), 543-555. DOI: 10.1016/j.physa.2005.04.014  

  • January 11, 2011
  • 12:20 PM
  • 813 views

What Was Lost in the Fire: A Conservation Memorial

by Eric Michael Johnson in The Primate Diaries

The latest stop in the #PDEx tour is being hosted by Reconciliation Ecology:The modern conservation movement began at dawn on December 8, 1850, above the north fork of California's San Joaquin river. Soft orange light had just begun to spill over the craggy peaks of the eastern Ahwahnee mountains causing the jagged minarets to ignite like still burning embers from the Indian campfires below. All remained still inside the wigwams of the Ahwahneechee camp. But an attuned ear would have noticed ........ Read more »

  • January 11, 2011
  • 12:20 PM
  • 712 views

What Was Lost in the Fire: A Conservation Memorial

by Eric Michael Johnson in The Primate Diaries in Exile

The latest stop in the #PDEx tour is being hosted by Reconciliation Ecology:The modern conservation movement began at dawn on December 8, 1850, above the north fork of California's San Joaquin river. Soft orange light had just begun to spill over the craggy peaks of the eastern Ahwahnee mountains causing the jagged minarets to ignite like still burning embers from the Indian campfires below. All remained still inside the wigwams of the Ahwahneechee camp. But an attuned ear would have noticed ........ Read more »

  • January 11, 2011
  • 08:00 AM
  • 965 views

The Pedagogy of Obesity Reality Shows

by Arya M. Sharma in Dr. Sharma's Obesity Notes

One of the consequences of the obesity epidemic is the proliferation of “reality based” media aiming to lay bare and expose the unhealthy behaviours that lead to obesity and tout “solutions” primarily aimed at changing individual lifestyles.
Notable examples of this ‘”entertainment” genre include television programmes such as Jamie’s School Dinners and Jamie’s Ministry of Food, [...]... Read more »

  • January 11, 2011
  • 07:00 AM
  • 997 views

What music do you listen to when you’re feeling sad?

by David Bradley in Sciencetext

They tell you when you’re feeling blue to put on a sad song. But, new research published in the International Journal of Arts and Technology suggests that the music we choose to listen to is guided more by familiarity than whether we are in a happy or sad mood and whether or not a particular [...]Post from: David Bradley's Sciencetext Tech TalkWhat music do you listen to when you’re feeling sad?
... Read more »

Jiyoun Kim. (2011) Affective states, familiarity and music selection: power of familiarity. Int. J. Arts and Technology, 4(1), 74-89. info:/

  • January 11, 2011
  • 02:00 AM
  • 567 views

Introducing the ‘gay gene’: media and scientific representations

by SAGE Insight in SAGE Insight

From Public Understanding of Science  There is an established link between genetics and male homosexuality, popularly dubbed the ‘gay gene’. This article examines the reporting of the ‘gay gene’ in the British press compared with scientific journals to illustrate the conflicts between science and the media, it attempts to suggest steps to improve the relationship [...]... Read more »

  • January 10, 2011
  • 12:40 PM
  • 1,452 views

Count Your Plaintiffs Before Certification Hatches: Class Size Matters in Some Unexpected Ways

by Dr. Ken Broda-Bahm in Persuasive Litigator

By: Dr. Ken Broda-Bahm - When dealing with the number of plaintiffs in a class action, mass tort, or other large scale litigation, is "Super-Size Me" the plaintiff's best choice? At a legal level, the U.S. Supreme Court will get a chance to weigh in, after the decision last week to determine whether as many as 1.5 million female Wal-Mart workers claiming gender discrimination can be certified as a class (Dukes v. Wal-Mart). The common belief is that a large number of plaintiffs serves to maximiz........ Read more »

Loran F. Nordgren and Mary-Hunter Morris McDonnell. (2010) The Scope-Severity Paradox: Why Doing More Harm Is Judged to be Less Harmful. Social Psychological and. info:/

  • January 10, 2011
  • 11:02 AM
  • 746 views

Care and equality in volunteer tourism: the perspective of locals

by Émilie Crossley in Journeys through the psychosocial

Advocates of volunteer tourism are keen to stress that the relationship between hosts and guests it engenders is one of responsibility, equality and reciprocity. It is a model of tourism that supposedly brings benefits to all parties involved, especially to host communities in developing countries, and which stands in firm opposition to the insensitive and [...]... Read more »

Sin, H.L. (2010) Who are we responsible to? Locals’ tales of volunteer tourism. Geoforum, 983-992. info:/

  • January 10, 2011
  • 08:15 AM
  • 1,456 views

Delusions, odd and common: Living in the prodrome, part 2

by Daniel Lende in Neuroanthropology PLoS

Author Rachel Aviv talked at length with a number of young people who had been identified as being ‘prodromal’ for schizophrenia, experiencing periodic delusions and at risk of converting to full-blown schizophrenia, following some of the at-risk individuals for a year.  In December’s Harper’s, Aviv offered a sensitive, insightful account of their day-to-day struggles to maintain insight, recognizing which of their experiences are not real: Which way madness lies: Can psychosis be preve........ Read more »

Bauer, S., Schanda, H., Karakula, H., Olajossy-Hilkesberger, L., Rudaleviciene, P., Okribelashvili, N., Chaudhry, H., Idemudia, S., Gscheider, S., & Ritter, K. (2010) Culture and the prevalence of hallucinations in schizophrenia. Comprehensive Psychiatry. DOI: 10.1016/j.comppsych.2010.06.008  

Corcoran, C., Davidson, L., Sills-Shahar, R., Nickou, C., Malaspina, D., Miller, T., & McGlashan, T. (2003) A Qualitative Research Study of the Evolution of Symptoms in Individuals Identified as Prodromal to Psychosis. Psychiatric Quarterly, 74(4), 313-332. DOI: 10.1023/A:1026083309607  

Koenig HG. (2009) Research on religion, spirituality, and mental health: a review. Canadian journal of psychiatry. Revue canadienne de psychiatrie, 54(5), 283-91. PMID: 19497160  

Roth, T., Lubin, F., Sodhi, M., & Kleinman, J. (2009) Epigenetic mechanisms in schizophrenia. Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) - General Subjects, 1790(9), 869-877. DOI: 10.1016/j.bbagen.2009.06.009  

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