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  • May 23, 2011
  • 01:18 PM
  • 1,309 views

Power Corrupts? Research Says, "Not Always..."

by Psych Your Mind in Psych Your Mind





Did power lead to Arnold's infidelity? source
"Power tends to corrupt, and absolute power corrupts absolutely." Lord Acton (1887)

We have many ideas about leaders in our society-- those individuals who have the capacity to influence the rewards and punishments of the rest of us. One of the more prominent opinions is expressed in the above quote. That is, powerful people are arrogant, selfish, greedy, immoral, and deceitful. Some research tends to support this perspective:

For........ Read more »

Côté S, Kraus MW, Cheng BH, Oveis C, van der Löwe I, Lian H, & Keltner D. (2011) Social power facilitates the effect of prosocial orientation on empathic accuracy. Journal of personality and social psychology. PMID: 21463075  

  • May 23, 2011
  • 11:52 AM
  • 1,038 views

Be Relatively Cautious With Absolutist Jurors

by Persuasion Strategies in Persuasive Litigator

By: Dr. Ken Broda-Bahm - When I heard that the world would be ending on May 21, 2011, I knew that I would be set either way: If the world didn't end, I would have a good blog topic, and if it did, well then, no more worrying about blog topics. So, here we are, still unraptured, on Monday, May 23rd, and the jury-relevant lesson has to do with the extremes of human certainty, and the question of what litigators need to do with those who are absolutist in their thinking and prefer a "black and wh........ Read more »

  • May 23, 2011
  • 09:03 AM
  • 1,347 views

Neuroethics: The Brain and Political Beliefs

by William Yates, M.D. in Brain Posts

Article first published as Brain Science and Political Belief on Technorati.Brain science is providing some important insights into the mechanisms involved in a variety of beliefs including political, religious and moral beliefs. Dr. Jordan Grafman, Ph.D. currently with the Kessler Foundation has led some of the key research initiatives in this area of brain research. He recently presented at the May, 2011 Warren Frontiers in Neuroscience lecture series in Tulsa, Oklahoma. I previ........ Read more »

  • May 23, 2011
  • 07:02 AM
  • 1,302 views

Birthers, deathers, and did you hear about Jimmy Hoffa?

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

Conspiracy theorists have been with us for perhaps, forever. Most recently we’ve been reading about birthers and deathers. But the idea of conspiracy theories goes beyond fringe elements. According to a recent issue of Rasmussen Reports, 53% of us believe elections are rigged to help incumbents in Congress. Sometimes, those espousing conspiracy theories are actually harmed when [...]


Related posts:I can’t hear you!
“I can look into his eyes and just tell he is lying”
Detecting De........ Read more »

  • May 23, 2011
  • 04:19 AM
  • 1,621 views

Starve the judges

by Jason Collins in Evolving Economics

The media and blogosphere has dedicated plenty of column and blog inches to a recently published study by Danziger and colleagues on how parole rates by Israeli judges vary through the day. From the abstract: We record the judges’ two daily food breaks, which result in segmenting the deliberations of the day into three distinct “decision [...]... Read more »

Danziger, S., Levav, J., & Avnaim-Pesso, L. (2011) Extraneous factors in judicial decisions. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 108(17), 6889-6892. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1018033108  

  • May 21, 2011
  • 10:13 PM
  • 1,275 views

Life, Death, and Silver Bullets

by Paige Brown in From The Lab Bench

A Science Fiction story about the Age of the Superbug

There was something about her... a pale, reddish complexion, so rare these days... all the other desks in the dull classroom where occupied by students who faded together in their blue and gray hues... who snuck furtive glances at the ruddy newcomer, in her bright blue overalls and frizzy, untamed hair.
... Read more »

Patterson, J. (2010) Rising plague. Journal of Clinical Investigation, 120(3), 649-649. DOI: 10.1172/JCI42104  

  • May 21, 2011
  • 01:00 PM
  • 1,272 views

The Final Frontier: The Northern Sea Route

by Jan Husdal in husdal.com

Sought after by polar explorers and long awaited by the shipping community: The Northern Sea Route. Year by year the Arctic summer ice cap is melting and the race will be soon be on to take part in what is perhaps the last and final adventure in the development of maritime logistics and global shipping lanes.... Read more »

  • May 20, 2011
  • 10:01 AM
  • 1,509 views

Who Runs The World? Not Girls.

by Melanie Tannenbaum in PsySociety

This week, pop superstar Beyonce launched the music video for her newest single: Run The World (Girls). The song itself practically screams Female Empowerment Anthem with its repeating chorus of “Who runs the world? Girls!“ Empowering? Absolutely! Fun song to … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • May 20, 2011
  • 07:02 AM
  • 1,543 views

Simple Jury Persuasion: Graphics, Statistics and the ‘weight of the evidence’

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

A recent infographic created by the folks at Medical Billing and Coding is a terrific example of the persuasiveness of visual evidence. We are fans of visual evidence and have written about the appeal several times. Your graphic doesn’t have to be starchy and technical and, in fact, it’s better if it isn’t. The complete [...]


Related posts:Simple Jury Persuasion: The ‘attitude alignment’ effect & persuasion
Simple Jury Persuasion: KISS–Keeping it simple, simple…
Simple J........ Read more »

  • May 19, 2011
  • 11:03 PM
  • 2,514 views

I can haz rapshur? Endgame effects.

by Jon Wilkins in Lost in Transcription

So, you've probably heard that the world is ending this Saturday (or, as Tom Scocca explains, sometime between Friday evening and Sunday morning, depending on how the rapture interacts with the time zones). You may already have signed up on Facebook to attend the pre-rapture orgy and/or the post-rapture looting.

Earlier, I posted my discovery that you can be taken up by the rapture even if you're actively engaging in gay sex when it happens, which is pretty awesome.

But now I want to talk........ Read more »

  • May 19, 2011
  • 09:07 PM
  • 951 views

Homophily and Contagion Are Generically Confounded in Observational Social Network Studies

by Christopher Winship in SMR Blog

Shalizi, C., & Thomas, A. (2011). <a href=”Shalizi, C., & Thomas, A. (2011). Homophily and Contagion Are Generically Confounded in Observational Social Network Studies Sociological Methods & Research, 40 (2), 211-239 DOI: 10.1177/0049124111404820“>Homophily and Contagion Are Generically Confounded in Observational Social Network Studies Sociological Methods & Research, 40 (2), 211-239 DOI: 10.1177/0049124111404820  Featured article: Available [...]... Read more »

  • May 19, 2011
  • 09:07 PM
  • 698 views

Sensitivity Analysis for Contagion Effects in Social Networks

by Christopher Winship in SMR Blog

VanderWeele, T. (2011). Sensitivity Analysis for Contagion Effects in Social Networks Sociological Methods & Research, 40 (2), 240-255 DOI: 10.1177/0049124111404821  Featured article: Available to download free of charge via Sage Publications until November 15, 2011. Abstract & References Tyler J. VanderWeele, Harvard University, Boston, MA, USA, tvanderw@hsph.harvard.edu Filed under: full-text article, post Tagged: contagion effects, environmental confounding, [...]... Read more »

  • May 19, 2011
  • 09:06 PM
  • 476 views

An Extended Model Comparison Framework for Covariance and Mean Structure Models, Accommodating Multiple Groups and Latent Mixtures

by Christopher Winship in SMR Blog

Levy, R., & Hancock, G. (2011). An Extended Model Comparison Framework for Covariance and Mean Structure Models, Accommodating Multiple Groups and Latent Mixtures Sociological Methods & Research, 40 (2), 256-278 DOI: 10.1177/0049124111404819  Abstract  Roy Levy, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, USA, roy.levy@asu.edu Filed under: post Tagged: bootsrap, mixture model, model comparisons, multiple-group model, structural equation [...]... Read more »

  • May 19, 2011
  • 09:05 PM
  • 508 views

Measurement Equivalence of Ordinal Items: A Comparison of Factor Analytic, Item Response Theory, and Latent Class Approaches

by Christopher Winship in SMR Blog

Kankaras, M., Vermunt, J., & Moors, G. (2011). Measurement Equivalence of Ordinal Items: A Comparison of Factor Analytic, Item Response Theory, and Latent Class Approaches Sociological Methods & Research, 40 (2), 279-310 DOI: 10.1177/0049124111405301  Abstract Miloš Kankaraš, Tilburg University, Tilburg, The Netherlands, m.kankaras@uvt.nl Filed under: post Tagged: inequivalence, modeling assumptions, ordinal items, simulation data... Read more »

  • May 19, 2011
  • 09:04 PM
  • 551 views

Multiple Auxiliary Variables in Nonresponse Adjustment

by Christopher Winship in SMR Blog

Kreuter, F., & Olson, K. (2011). Multiple Auxiliary Variables in Nonresponse Adjustment Sociological Methods & Research, 40 (2), 311-332 DOI: 10.1177/0049124111400042  Abstract Frauke Kreuter, University of Maryland, College Park, USA and Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany, fkreuter@survey.umd.edu Filed under: post Tagged: mean square error, nonresponse bias adjustment, response propensity models, survey participation... Read more »

  • May 19, 2011
  • 09:04 PM
  • 514 views

When Change Matters: An Analysis of Survey Interaction in Dependent Interviewing on the British Household Panel Study

by Christopher Winship in SMR Blog

Uhrig, S., & Sala, E. (2011). When Change Matters: An Analysis of Survey Interaction in Dependent Interviewing on the British Household Panel Study Sociological Methods & Research, 40 (2), 333-366 DOI: 10.1177/0049124111404816  Abstract SC Noah Uhrig, University of Essex, United Kingdom, scnuhrig@essex.ac.uk Filed under: post Tagged: BHPS, dependent interviewing, interviewer—respondent interaction... Read more »

  • May 19, 2011
  • 09:03 PM
  • 528 views

Group-based Trajectory Modeling Extended to Account for Nonrandom Participant Attrition

by Christopher Winship in SMR Blog

Haviland, A., Jones, B., & Nagin, D. (2011). Group-based Trajectory Modeling Extended to Account for Nonrandom Participant Attrition Sociological Methods & Research, 40 (2), 367-390 DOI: 10.1177/0049124111400041  Abstract  Daniel S. Nagin, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA, USA, dn03@andrew.cmu.edu Filed under: post Tagged: attrition bias, finite mixture models, longitudinal data, trajectory groups... Read more »

  • May 19, 2011
  • 09:03 PM
  • 668 views

Assessing the Robustness of Crisp-set and Fuzzy-set QCA Results

by Christopher Winship in SMR Blog

Skaaning, S. (2011). Assessing the Robustness of Crisp-set and Fuzzy-set QCA Results Sociological Methods & Research DOI: 10.1177/0049124111404818  Abstract  Svend-Erik Skaaning, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark, Skaaning@ps.au.dk Filed under: post Tagged: configurational comparative methods, crisp-set, Fuzzy-set, QCA results, robustness tests... Read more »

  • May 19, 2011
  • 08:22 PM
  • 1,606 views

Glocalization à la Suisse

by Ingrid Piller in Language on the Move

When I lived in Basel, a city in the German-speaking part of Switzerland, I often found myself performing an involuntary field experiment in language attitudes. As likely to speak English as German in public, I was regularly confronted with strangers’ … Continue reading →... Read more »

Moser, Urs . (2010) Entwicklung der Sprachkompetenzen in der Erst- und Zweitsprache von Migrantenkindern. Do you speak Swiss? Verlag Neue Zuercher Zeitung, 105-107. info:/

  • May 19, 2011
  • 11:25 AM
  • 567 views

Beware of the Jury's "Filter Bubble"

by Persuasion Strategies in Persuasive Litigator

The phrase "filter bubble" refers to an internet phenomena, as well as to some basic psychology on how we receive and process information. It suggests the individual separation (that is the 'bubble' part) that occurs when the information that we read and think about is pre-screened (that is the 'filter' part) with and without our knowledge, in the name of customization. Yes, that is what the intenet now does: from news sites to search engines, we aren't reading from a common text, but are ins........ Read more »

Eli Pariser. (2011) The Filter Bubble: What the Internet Is Hiding from You . Penguin Press HC. info:/

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