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  • January 14, 2011
  • 04:58 PM
  • 1,100 views

The inevitable rise of Amish machines

by Razib Khan in Gene Expression

About 20 years ago I lived for a year in a rural area where Amish were a common feature of country roads and farmers’ markets. My parents, being Muslims, would sometimes buy chickens from the local Amish and slaughter them according to halal. We had a relationship with a particular family. They were nice people, [...]... Read more »

Rowthorn R. (2011) Religion, fertility and genes: a dual inheritance model. Proceedings. Biological sciences / The Royal Society. PMID: 21227968  

  • January 14, 2011
  • 08:03 AM
  • 1,186 views

Simple Jury Persuasion: Keep them from going with the immoral flow!

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

This isn’t a ‘feel good’ post about research into how we are driven to do good. Instead, it’s a post about how we don’t mind doing bad if it’s easier than doing (the more difficult) good. Those folks who advertise with the ‘easy’ button know a good thing when they see it. And it’s an [...]


Related posts:Simple Jury Persuasion: Christian religious concepts increase racial prejudice
Simple Jury Persuasion: You may want to disagree with this post
Simple Jury Persuasion: On caffe........ Read more »

Teper, R., & Inzlicht, M. (2010) Active transgressions and moral elusions: Action framing influences moral behavior. Social Psychological and Personality Science. info:/

Johnson, E. (2003) MEDICINE: Do Defaults Save Lives?. Science, 302(5649), 1338-1339. DOI: 10.1126/science.1091721  

  • January 14, 2011
  • 06:47 AM
  • 891 views

Agricultural biodiversity crucial to the agricultural “revolution”

by Jeremy in Agricultural Biodiversity Weblog

I’ve started dabbling in the marshy shallows around the deep pool of my ignorance of the modern history of agriculture, and one thing has become even more obvious. Mixed farming — mixed species of crop as well as mixed kingdoms of plants and animals — was without a doubt the sine qua non of both [...]... Read more »

  • January 13, 2011
  • 10:00 AM
  • 4,082 views

Help Jurors Detect (or Protect) Holes in Expert Analysis

by Dr. Kevin Boully in Persuasive Litigator

by: Dr. Kevin Boully Infamous rock singer Courtney Love is in trouble again. Unless you’re her lawyer (or one of her forgiving fans)1, you are probably wondering what Love’s troubles have to do with your persuasive advocacy. Fair question. The Hole lead singer’s 2009 Twitter tirade against fashion designer Dawn Simorangkir made her a defendant in a defamation lawsuit that may be headed for trial in early February.2 Most importantly, Ms. Simorangkir has reportedly retained a social media ........ Read more »

  • January 13, 2011
  • 07:52 AM
  • 1,066 views

Dog Exhibits Mutual Exclusivity Bias

by Sean Roberts in A Replicated Typo 2.0

Pilley & Reid (2010) describe the incredible Chaser: A border collie who knows over 1,000 words. But does he really have a mutual exclusivity bias?... Read more »

  • January 13, 2011
  • 07:49 AM
  • 990 views

Dog exhibits mutual exclusivity bias

by Sean Roberts in A Replicated Typo 2.0


Tweet


Pilley & Reid (2010) describe an experiment where a border collie was trained to learn proper nouns for objects.  After 3 years of training, the dog had learned over 1,000 proper names and showed no sign of slowing.  Experiments were run to test whether the dog understood the difference between nouns and commands and whether the . . . → Read More: Dog exhibits mutual exclusivity bias... Read more »

  • January 13, 2011
  • 02:00 AM
  • 653 views

When a “home” becomes a “house”: care and caring in the flood recovery process

by SAGE Insight in SAGE Insight

From Space and Culture             As Australia has become the latest victim of severe flooding, we are mindful of the potentially devastating consequences. This article looks back to the 2007 floods in North East England, to consider the care needs that are revealed, disrupted, and produced by the dependencies and vulnerabilities associated with flood recovery. It also uses diaries [...]... Read more »

  • January 12, 2011
  • 06:50 PM
  • 1,033 views

Dialects in Tweets

by Richard in A Replicated Typo 2.0

A recent study published in the proceedings of the Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing Conference (EMNLP) in October and presented in the LSA conference last week found evidence of geographical lexical variation in Twitter posts. (For news stories on it, see here and here.) Eisenstein, O’Connor, Smith and Xing took a batch of Twitter posts from a . . . → Read More: Dialects in Tweets... Read more »

Jacob Eisenstein, Brendan O'Connor, Noah A. Smith, & Eric P. Xing. (2010) A Latent Variable Model for Geographic Lexical Variation. . Proceedings of EMNLP. info:/

  • January 12, 2011
  • 03:25 PM
  • 1,025 views

Body Mass Index and Physical Attractiveness: Evidence From a Combination Image-Alteration/List Experiment

by Christopher Winship in SMR Blog

Conley, D., & McCabe, B. (2011). Body Mass Index and Physical Attractiveness: Evidence From a Combination Image-Alteration/List Experiment, Sociological Methods & Research, 40 (1), 6-31 DOI: 10.1177/0049124110390762 Featured article: Available to download free of charge via Sage Publications until 6/1/2011. Abstract & References, View Supplemental Data Dalton Conley, New York University, New York, NY, USA, conley@nyu.edu Filed under: post [...]... Read more »

  • January 12, 2011
  • 03:15 PM
  • 1,147 views

Nonparametric Tests of Panel Conditioning and Attrition Bias in Panel Surveys

by Christopher Winship in SMR Blog

Das, M., Toepoel, V., & van Soest, A. (2011). Nonparametric Tests of Panel Conditioning and Attrition Bias in Panel Surveys, Sociological Methods & Research, 40 (1), 32-56 DOI: 10.1177/0049124110390765, view abstract. Filed under: post Tagged: attrition bias, measurement error, panel conditioning, panel surveys... Read more »

  • January 12, 2011
  • 03:06 PM
  • 627 views

Two Algorithms for Relaxed Structural Balance Partitioning: Linking Theory, Models, and Data to Understand Social Network Phenomena

by Christopher Winship in SMR Blog

Brusco, M., Doreian, P., Mrvar, A., & Steinley, D. (2010). Two Algorithms for Relaxed Structural Balance Partitioning: Linking Theory, Models, and Data to Understand Social Network Phenomena, Sociological Methods & Research, 40 (1), 57-87 DOI: 10.1177/0049124110384947, view abstract. Filed under: post Tagged: algorithms, blockmodeling, relaxed structural balance, signed networks... Read more »

  • January 12, 2011
  • 03:04 PM
  • 666 views

The Effects of Asking Filter Questions in Interleafed Versus Grouped Format

by Christopher Winship in SMR Blog

Kreuter, F., McCulloch, S., Presser, S., & Tourangeau, R. (2011). The Effects of Asking Filter Questions in Interleafed Versus Grouped Format Sociological Methods & Research, 40 (1), 88-104 DOI: 10.1177/0049124110392342, view abstract. Filed under: post Tagged: filter questions, questionnaire design, respondent behavior, response burden... Read more »

Kreuter, F., McCulloch, S., Presser, S., & Tourangeau, R. (2011) The Effects of Asking Filter Questions in Interleafed Versus Grouped Format. Sociological Methods , 40(1), 88-104. DOI: 10.1177/0049124110392342  

  • January 12, 2011
  • 03:01 PM
  • 626 views

Estimating Propensity Adjustments for Volunteer Web Surveys

by Christopher Winship in SMR Blog

Valliant, R., & Dever, J. (2011). Estimating Propensity Adjustments for Volunteer Web Surveys Sociological Methods & Research, 40 (1), 105-137 DOI: 10.1177/0049124110392533, view abstract. Filed under: post Tagged: calibration estimator, logistic regression, nonignorable selection, propensity model, reference survey, web survey... Read more »

  • January 12, 2011
  • 02:48 PM
  • 646 views

Multiple Sources of Nonobservation Error in Telephone Surveys: Coverage and Nonresponse

by Christopher Winship in SMR Blog

Peytchev, A., Carley-Baxter, L., & Black, M. (2011). Multiple Sources of Nonobservation Error in Telephone Surveys: Coverage and Nonresponse Sociological Methods & Research, 40 (1), 138-168 DOI: 10.1177/0049124110392547, view abstract. Filed under: post Tagged: cell phone, coverage bias, dual frame, nonresponse bias, two phase, weighting adjustments... Read more »

  • January 12, 2011
  • 02:24 PM
  • 894 views

Sensitive Questions in Online Surveys: Experimental Results for the Randomized Response Technique (RRT) and the Unmatched Count Technique (UCT)

by Christopher Winship in SMR Blog

Coutts, E., & Jann, B. (2011). Sensitive Questions in Online Surveys: Experimental Results for the Randomized Response Technique (RRT) and the Unmatched Count Technique (UCT) Sociological Methods & Research, 40 (1), 169-193 DOI: 10.1177/0049124110390768, view abstract. Filed under: post Tagged: item count technique, methodological experiment, online survey, randomized response technique, sensitive questions, unmatched count technique... Read more »

  • January 12, 2011
  • 07:02 AM
  • 764 views

Voir Dire Tip: Are you ‘transported’ by a good story?

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

As a kid, I loved a good story, especially scary or suspenseful ones. And I still do. It’s just that now I tend to listen to them on my iPod while driving or flying across the country.  As a trial consultant, it’s part of the job to help craft a case narrative into a really good [...]


Related posts:The story of the numbers behind the story
You’re not too old for a story (but you might be too young!)
Voir dire lesson: “I don’t believe everything I hear”
... Read more »

Mazzocco, PJ, Green, MC, Sasota, JA, & Jones, NW. (2010) This story is not for everyone: Transportability and Narrative Persuasion. . Social Psychological and Personality Science, 1(4), 361-368. info:/

  • January 12, 2011
  • 06:44 AM
  • 1,342 views

The speed of cities, part II

by Jason Collins in Evolving Economics

As I described in my last post, there is a strong relationship between the size of cities and the residents’ speed of walking. The larger the city, the quicker its residents scamper from A to B. A number of studies have confirmed this relationship and have broadened the relationship to the speed of other activities [...]... Read more »

Levine, R., & Norenzayan, A. (1999) The Pace of Life in 31 Countries. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 30(2), 178-205. DOI: 10.1177/0022022199030002003  

  • January 12, 2011
  • 02:00 AM
  • 525 views

Links between alcohol consumption, our perception of others and increased levels of aggression

by SAGE Insight in SAGE Insight

Effects of acute alcohol consumption on the perception of eye gaze direction From Journal of Psychopharmacology This article explores the link between alcohol and increased aggression by assessing differences in how people look at others. The study uses a gaze perception task to monitor the response of participants to stimulus faces to gauge if they [...]... Read more »

Penton-Voak, I., Cooper, R., Roberts, R., Attwood, A., & Munafo, M. (2010) Effects of acute alcohol consumption on the perception of eye gaze direction. Journal of Psychopharmacology. DOI: 10.1177/0269881110385599  

  • January 11, 2011
  • 03:40 PM
  • 1,323 views

The Statistical Mechanics of Money

by Joseph Smidt in The Eternal Universe

Yesterday I listened to a talk by Victor Yakovenko of the University of Maryland about the physics of money and it was quite interesting. I think that after this talk I am finally beginning to understand economics while at the same time I suspect that most economists don't.

In his talk he said that back in 2000 he published a paper on how to apply statistical mechanics to free market economics.... Read more »

XI, N., DING, N., & WANG, Y. (2005) How required reserve ratio affects distribution and velocity of money☆. Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, 357(3-4), 543-555. DOI: 10.1016/j.physa.2005.04.014  

  • January 11, 2011
  • 12:20 PM
  • 817 views

What Was Lost in the Fire: A Conservation Memorial

by Eric Michael Johnson in The Primate Diaries

The latest stop in the #PDEx tour is being hosted by Reconciliation Ecology:The modern conservation movement began at dawn on December 8, 1850, above the north fork of California's San Joaquin river. Soft orange light had just begun to spill over the craggy peaks of the eastern Ahwahnee mountains causing the jagged minarets to ignite like still burning embers from the Indian campfires below. All remained still inside the wigwams of the Ahwahneechee camp. But an attuned ear would have noticed ........ Read more »

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