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  • February 9, 2011
  • 07:02 AM
  • 1,822 views

We pray with closed eyes

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

We’ve talked about the “look inside yourself” strategy in case presentation before.  It’s a deceptively simple strategy to minimize bias and to help jurors get in touch with their moral center rather than operating blindly on pre-existing assumptions. Okay, so part of it may be in the delivery by our client Richard– who has a [...]

Related posts:“I can look into his eyes and just tell he is lying”

Imagine and decrease bias

The Jury Expert for May........ Read more »

  • February 9, 2011
  • 02:00 AM
  • 802 views

Ignore Facebook, Twitter, Flickr and the rest, to your detriment: the importance of social media

by SAGE Insight in SAGE Insight

Be where the conversations are: the critical importance of social media From Business Information Review It has become clear that the website is no longer the most important single online source of information. It is now vital that we pay attention to social media conversations.  People and companies have a presence in a wider variety [...]... Read more »

  • February 8, 2011
  • 05:00 PM
  • 813 views

The Social Network and Anorexia

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic

Could social networks be more important than the media in the spread of eating disorders?There's a story about eating disorders roughly like this: eating disorders (ED) are about wanting to be thin. The idea that thinness is desireable is something that's spread by Western media, especially visual media i.e. TV and magazines. Therefore, Western media exposure causes eating disorders.It's a nice simple theory. And it seems to fit with the fact that eating disorders, hitherto very rare, start to a........ Read more »

Becker, A., Fay, K., Agnew-Blais, J., Khan, A., Striegel-Moore, R., & Gilman, S. (2011) Social network media exposure and adolescent eating pathology in Fiji. The British Journal of Psychiatry, 198(1), 43-50. DOI: 10.1192/bjp.bp.110.078675  

  • February 8, 2011
  • 03:21 PM
  • 1,844 views

If You Can't Say Something Nice ...

by Krystal D'Costa in Anthropology in Practice


Fuhgettaboutit!
Who you tawkin' to?
Yuh caen't pahk yuh cah heah.
Who drank da last o'da cawfee?
Whatsa matta wid you?
Ah, the sounds of New York City! I can identify a New Yorker in conversation in a heartbeat. And it's likely that the rest of the country can as well. Residents of New York City and western Long Island (or Lung Guylan as I am apt to pronounce it—a good friend of mine from the Midwest once told me that I was the only person she knew who could produce such a hard /g/ in front ........ Read more »

  • February 8, 2011
  • 09:05 AM
  • 1,396 views

Is dilution the solution to information pollution?

by Jeremy Yoder in Denim and Tweed

Chris Smith, my good friend and longtime collaborator on all things relating to Joshua trees, pulled into the gas station well after dark. He was on his way back to our field site in the Nevada desert, and this was the last stop before cell phone signals disappeared for good and you had watch the highway ahead for free-range cattle.

It was also the last stop for fresh water, gasoline, and propane. Chris fueled up the van, then went inside for help refilling the spare propane tank. The unshaven,........ Read more »

  • February 8, 2011
  • 08:33 AM
  • 1,482 views

Healthy Men Bottle Up Their Emotions

by Ultimo167 in Strong Silent Types

The crisis of masculinity dictates that men must all be hurtling toward hell at a rate of knots, with nothing in clear sight to redeem us. However, could it be that padded out panic is as manufactured as frozen peas? Possibly. For sure though, much that is said about how men do emotions and do help for emotions that get too much borrows loosely from the truth. The truth, itself, is remarkably more diverse and complex. ... Read more »

Levant, R, Wimer, D, & Williams, C. (2011) An Evaluation of the Health Behavior Inventory-20 (HBI-20) and Its Relationship to Masculinity and Attitudes Towards Seeking Psychological Help Among College Men. Psychology of Men . info:/

  • February 8, 2011
  • 07:12 AM
  • 1,331 views

Banking as an ecosystem

by Jason Collins in Evolving Economics

Most of my interest in the use of biology in economics concerns humans being subject to the forces of selection like any other biological organism. With this starting point, it is natural to pull across many of the tools, models and methods of analysis that evolutionary biologists use. Sometimes those models and tools are of [...]... Read more »

Haldane, A., & May, R. (2011) Systemic risk in banking ecosystems. Nature, 469(7330), 351-355. DOI: 10.1038/nature09659  

  • February 8, 2011
  • 05:38 AM
  • 886 views

Employability – attitudes & orientations

by David Winter in Careers - in Theory

In the last post I discussed the definitions of employability that had been created by a variety of groups (employers, policy makers and academics). Did you spot the glaring omission? On the whole, students and graduates don’t tend to go in for definitions of employability; they are too busy trying to live it. However, Martin [...]... Read more »

  • February 7, 2011
  • 09:25 PM
  • 901 views

Choice vs Gender Discrimination in Math-Intensive Science

by Michael Long in Phased

Choice, not direct discrimination, explains the current low representation of women in tenure-track, math-intensive, research-based faculty positions.... Read more »

Stephen J. Ceci, & Wendy M. Williams. (2011) Understanding current causes of women’s underrepresentation in science. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. info:/10.1073/pnas.1014871108

  • February 7, 2011
  • 07:02 AM
  • 1,126 views

Does your capital client “look deathworthy”?

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

If your client is African American, jurors will demonstrate to you that the answer is much more likely to be yes. And the more stereotypically black (with darker skin and wider nose)—the more likely the death penalty will be assigned. Hard to stomach? Yes. Hard to believe? We didn’t think so. But it is pretty [...]


Related posts:Does ‘death qualification’ systematically bias our juries?
I read the entire newspaper every day
“I can look into his eyes and just tell he is lying”
... Read more »

Eberhardt JL, Davies PG, Purdie-Vaughns VJ, & Johnson SL. (2006) Looking deathworthy: perceived stereotypicality of Black defendants predicts capital-sentencing outcomes. Psychological science : a journal of the American Psychological Society / APS, 17(5), 383-6. PMID: 16683924  

  • February 7, 2011
  • 12:53 AM
  • 1,345 views

Choosing chronic pain questionnaires

by Bronwyn Thompson in Healthskills: Skills for Healthy Living

Choosing a set of questionnaires for an assessment battery can be a task fraught with all kinds of traps, because if there is one thing bound to get clinical tongues flapping, it’s the idea that their favourite questionnaire will be left out of the mix! And to complicate matters for us Southern Hemispherians, most of … Read more... Read more »

DWORKIN, R., TURK, D., WYRWICH, K., BEATON, D., CLEELAND, C., FARRAR, J., HAYTHORNTHWAITE, J., JENSEN, M., KERNS, R., & ADER, D. (2008) Interpreting the Clinical Importance of Treatment Outcomes in Chronic Pain Clinical Trials: IMMPACT Recommendations. The Journal of Pain, 9(2), 105-121. DOI: 10.1016/j.jpain.2007.09.005  

  • February 6, 2011
  • 04:32 PM
  • 1,078 views

Droughts and the decline and rise of urban civilizations

by Michael Smith in Wide Urban World

Paleoclimatic data from a new tree-ring sequence in central Mexico have implications for the fall and rise of cities and urban societies before the Spanish conquest.... Read more »

Stahle, David W., José Villanueva-Díaz, Dorian J. Burnette, Julián Cerano Paredes, Richard Heim, Jr., Falko K. Fye, Rodolfo A. Soto, Matthew D. Therrell, Malcolm K. Cleaveland, and D. K. Stahle. (2011) Major Mesoamerican Droughts of the Past Millennium. Geophysical Research Letters. info:/

  • February 4, 2011
  • 05:04 PM
  • 1,429 views

IQ Test for bacteria

by Jonathan Eisen in The Tree of Life





Social IQ of bacteria
Another quick one here.  Interesting paper out in BMC Genomics: Genome sequence of the pattern forming Paenibacillus vortex bacterium reveals potential for thriving in complex environments

The paper is from Eshel-Ben Jacob and colleagues from many institutions around the world.

Here is a summary of the article (from the paper)

BackgroundThe pattern-forming bacterium Paenibacillus vortex is notable for its advanced social behavior, which is reflected in deve........ Read more »

  • February 4, 2011
  • 04:59 PM
  • 1,007 views

Casual sex is not so bad after all

by Tom Rees in Epiphenom



Some women from Mars
A while ago I read a paper arguing that religion 'protected' teens against sex. It was your usual analysis - finding that religious teens are less likely to have sex outside of marriage - but the tacit presumption intrigued me. Is sex really that harmful?

Well, no one study is going to answer that, but here's one from Jesse Owen and colleagues at the University of Louisville helps shed some light on it.

Their study has the advantage over most in this field in that it's l........ Read more »

  • February 4, 2011
  • 04:03 PM
  • 834 views

Touching Death

by Eric Michael Johnson in The Primate Diaries in Exile

The latest stop in the #PDEx tour is being hosted by The Prancing Papio:There is something intensely animal about our relationship with the dead. As an atheist I don’t feel particular reverence or awe at the site of a cadaver. It mostly just creeps me out. But even religious believers, those who should be comfortable with the idea that a dead body retains no trace of the person they once knew, also seem to have trouble letting go of what St. Paul called “confidence in the flesh.” In funera........ Read more »

Cronin, K., van Leeuwen, E., Mulenga, I., & Bodamer, M. (2011) Behavioral response of a chimpanzee mother toward her dead infant. American Journal of Primatology. DOI: 10.1002/ajp.20927  

  • February 4, 2011
  • 04:03 PM
  • 846 views

Touching Death

by Eric Michael Johnson in The Primate Diaries

The latest stop in the #PDEx tour is being hosted by The Prancing Papio:There is something intensely animal about our relationship with the dead. As an atheist I don’t feel particular reverence or awe at the site of a cadaver. It mostly just creeps me out. But even religious believers, those who should be comfortable with the idea that a dead body retains no trace of the person they once knew, also seem to have trouble letting go of what St. Paul called “confidence in the flesh.” In funera........ Read more »

Cronin, K., van Leeuwen, E., Mulenga, I., & Bodamer, M. (2011) Behavioral response of a chimpanzee mother toward her dead infant. American Journal of Primatology. DOI: 10.1002/ajp.20927  

  • February 4, 2011
  • 01:24 PM
  • 1,431 views

Early Complex Societies & Early Organized Religions

by Cris Campbell in Genealogy of Religion

Historians have long known that the shelf life of complex societies throughout human history has been rather limited. Archaeologists are aware of this also. But how to explain it?
In a recent (open access) paper, “Cycling in the Complexity of Early Societies,” Sergey Gavrilets and colleagues mathematically modeled early complex societies using a number of variables [...]... Read more »

Gavrilets, Sergey, Anderson, David G., & Turchin, Peter. (2010) Cycling in the Complexity of Early Societies. Cliodynamics: The Journal of Theoretical and Mathematical History, 1(1), 59-80. info:/http://escholarship.org/uc/item/5536t55r

  • February 4, 2011
  • 12:18 PM
  • 1,568 views

Culturomics does not exist

by Bjørn Østman in Pleiotropy

'Culturomics' does not exist. As far as I'm concerned, if it isn't on Wikipedia, it doesn't exist. However, it is listed on Wikipedia's Word of the year for 2010 under the designation 'Least likely to succeed'. As an amusing side note, it also says this: Most Unnecessary: refudiate (Blend of refute and repudiate used by Sarah Palin on Twitter. The laughs.... Read more »

Michel, J., Shen, Y., Aiden, A., Veres, A., Gray, M., , ., Pickett, J., Hoiberg, D., Clancy, D., Norvig, P.... (2010) Quantitative Analysis of Culture Using Millions of Digitized Books. Science, 331(6014), 176-182. DOI: 10.1126/science.1199644  

  • February 4, 2011
  • 07:02 AM
  • 1,587 views

Simple Jury Persuasion: Stand up straight but avoid gesturing with your hands in front of the jury!

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

Just in time for the New Year—we have breaking news in research about how to achieve success and stay on message. First, Mom was right (again)! Stand up straight! And stop talking so much with your hands! It’s distracting. While Mom was right about that first one (stand up straight!) she was wrong about the reasons [...]


Related posts:Simple Jury Persuasion: You may want to disagree with this post
Simple Jury Persuasion: Be Powerful in the Courtroom
Simple Jury Persuasion: Avoid ‘oo........ Read more »

Susan Goldin-Meadow, & Sian L. Beilock. (2010) Action’s Influence on Thought: The Case of Gesture. . Perspectives on Psychological Science, 5(6). info:/

Huang L, Galinsky AD, Gruenfeld DH, & Guillory LE. (2011) Powerful postures versus powerful roles: which is the proximate correlate of thought and behavior?. Psychological science : a journal of the American Psychological Society / APS, 22(1), 95-102. PMID: 21149853  

  • February 3, 2011
  • 05:42 AM
  • 1,333 views

Human (amphibious model): living in and on the water

by gregdowney in Neuroanthropology

At the beginning of the film clip, Bajau fisherman Sulbin sits on the side of a boat on the coast of Borneo, gulping air, handling his speargun.  And then, he drops into the water.  The footage suddenly changes and becomes arresting: silent, dreamy, slow, and so blue.  Sulbin strokes deliberately and descends until he strides along the bottom of the ocean, holding his breath, and hunts for fish through handmade goggles.
Finally, after a couple of minutes, he spears a fish and heads for the su........ Read more »

Bavis, R., Powell, F., Bradford, A., Hsia, C., Peltonen, J., Soliz, J., Zeis, B., Fergusson, E., Fu, Z., Gassmann, M.... (2007) Respiratory plasticity in response to changes in oxygen supply and demand. Integrative and Comparative Biology, 47(4), 532-551. DOI: 10.1093/icb/icm070  

Ferretti, G. (2001) Extreme human breath-hold diving. European Journal of Applied Physiology, 84(4), 254-271. DOI: 10.1007/s004210000377  

Ferretti G, & Costa M. (2003) Diversity in and adaptation to breath-hold diving in humans. Comparative biochemistry and physiology. Part A, Molecular , 136(1), 205-13. PMID: 14527641  

Gislén A, Dacke M, Kröger RH, Abrahamsson M, Nilsson DE, & Warrant EJ. (2003) Superior underwater vision in a human population of sea gypsies. Current biology : CB, 13(10), 833-6. PMID: 12747831  

Gislén A, Warrant EJ, Dacke M, & Kröger RH. (2006) Visual training improves underwater vision in children. Vision research, 46(20), 3443-50. PMID: 16806388  

Parkes, M. (2005) Breath-holding and its breakpoint. Experimental Physiology, 91(1), 1-15. DOI: 10.1113/expphysiol.2005.031625  

Schagatay E, van Kampen M, Emanuelsson S, & Holm B. (2000) Effects of physical and apnea training on apneic time and the diving response in humans. European journal of applied physiology, 82(3), 161-9. PMID: 10929209  

SCHOLANDER PF, HAMMEL HT, LEMESSURIER H, HEMMINGSEN E, & GAREY W. (1962) Circulatory adjustment in pearl divers. Journal of applied physiology, 184-90. PMID: 13909130  

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