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  • October 18, 2010
  • 02:37 PM
  • 785 views

Working and chronic pain

by Bronwyn Thompson in Healthskills: Skills for Healthy Living

If there is one aspect of chronic pain management that has received more attention than returning to work, I don’t know it! In 1995 when I started working at my current workplace, work was almost a dirty word. I was accused at one time of being a ‘Siberian workcamp’ Commandante because some people thought it … Read more... Read more »

Costa-Black, K., Loisel, P., Anema, J., & Pransky, G. (2010) Back pain and work. Best Practice , 24(2), 227-240. DOI: 10.1016/j.berh.2009.11.007  

  • October 18, 2010
  • 10:04 AM
  • 545 views

Two DonorsChoose projects you must support: Girls are good at math, and Technology tools while pregnant

by Kate Clancy in Context & Variation

A plea to fund DonorsChoose projects that highlights research on sexism in mathematics instruction.... Read more »

Alessandri SM, & Lewis M. (1993) Parental evaluation and its relation to shame and pride in young children. Sex Roles, 335-343. info:/

Fennema, E., Peterson, P., Carpenter, T., & Lubinski, C. (1990) Teachers attributions and beliefs about girls, boys, and mathematics. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 21(1), 55-69. DOI: 10.1007/BF00311015  

  • October 18, 2010
  • 09:49 AM
  • 471 views

Alienated Youth More Likely to Lash Out

by APS Daily Observations in Daily Observations

Being rejected by their peers hurts all kids, but they vary in the way they react. Some kids deal with rejection by lashing out, which, taken to the extreme, can ... Read more »

Reijntjes, A., Thomaes, S., Bushman, B.J., Boelen, P.A., de Castro, B.O., & Telch, M.J. (2010) The outcast-lash-out effect in youth: alienation increases aggression following peer rejection. Psychological science : a journal of the Association for Psychological Science/ APS. PMID: 20739674  

  • October 18, 2010
  • 02:28 AM
  • 511 views

Otto Selz: The Pioneer of Cognitive Thought Decades Before the Cognitive Revolution

by John Wayland in The Darwin Tribune

Otto Selz isn't a name many psychology students will ever come across often. Unfortunately, it seems with such big names of the 20th Century, such as Freud, Skinner etc taking centre stage, that many other prominent psychologists don't make it into the textbooks. This isn't to suggest their contribution was any less meaningful. On the contrary, today's article focuses on Otto Selz's work and life in the hope that many psychology students will discover a name they might not come across in cl........ Read more »

  • October 17, 2010
  • 06:01 PM
  • 1,021 views

Six levels of risk management

by Jan Husdal in husdal.com

In "Risk management in a dynamic society: a modelling problem" author Jens Rasmussen argues that risk management includes several levels ranging from legislators, over managers and work planners, to system operators. [ ... ]... Read more »

  • October 16, 2010
  • 07:08 PM
  • 675 views

Making Fun of Gays is Such Fun...!

by Ultimo167 in Strong Silent Types

It would seem that overt acts of homophobic violence on campus might be in decline, replaced by a more insidious form of 'antigay' violence. In this study by Jewell and Morrison (2010), they ponder why it is that straight Canadian university students can hold, if not necessarily express, their homophobic attitudes.... Read more »

  • October 16, 2010
  • 05:22 PM
  • 603 views

Understanding segregation in American Churches.

by Tom Rees in Epiphenom

Cliff Huang has created some amazing graphics depicting racial segregation in US cities. What I found fascinating was quite how sharp many of the boundaries are. They're often sharper than you would expect if the causes were simply economic.

That's because there's a powerful social phenomenom at work here, which is simply that people prefer to be with their own 'kind'. If you identify with a particular community, and that community is defined ethnically, then living outside of it can be very un........ Read more »

  • October 16, 2010
  • 05:21 AM
  • 2,027 views

The @#$% 2010 Ig Nobel Peace Prize: Pain files 1

by gregdowney in Neuroanthropology


The 2010 Ig Nobel Prizes were awarded recently by the Annals of Improbable Science, and a paper I read a while ago and wanted to comment on won the Ig Nobel for Peace! (By the way, comment on, not because I thought it was Ig Nobel-esque, but because it was actually relevant to my work — what does that say about my research!?)! Congratulations to Richard Stephens, John Atkins, and Andrew Kingston for the prize, awarded for their paper, ‘Swearing as a Response to Pain,’ in Neur........ Read more »

  • October 15, 2010
  • 10:47 PM
  • 502 views

Saving more than species at Nagoya

by Noam Ross in Noam Ross

There's been a whole lot of interesting stuff coming out this week related the Conference of the Parties (COP 10) for the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) going on in Nagoya, Japan right now.   CBD's goal was to slow the loss of biodiversity loss by 2010, but that goal was not achieved, and nations are hammering out how to revive the CBD with new goals for 2020.
At a prepatory meeting in May, governments agreed on 20 more specific draft targets, which aim to be “SMART” -........ Read more »

Perrings, C., Naeem, S., Ahrestani, F., Bunker, D., Burkill, P., Canziani, G., Elmqvist, T., Ferrati, R., Fuhrman, J., Jaksic, F.... (2010) Ecosystem Services for 2020. Science, 330(6002), 323-324. DOI: 10.1126/science.1196431  

  • October 15, 2010
  • 05:47 PM
  • 545 views

Why Do Americans Have Yards?

by teofilo in Gambler's House

Today is Blog Action Day, and the topic is water.  I did a post for this last year when the topic was climate change, so I figured I’d do it again.  Water is obviously a huge issue, especially in the arid Southwest, so there are a lot of directions I could go with this.  I [...]... Read more »

  • October 14, 2010
  • 09:03 AM
  • 586 views

Time Is Money. Or Is It?

by APS Daily Observations in Daily Observations

Which makes you happier—thinking about time or money? A new study published in Psychological Science finds that people who are made to think about time plan to spend more of ... Read more »

Mogilner, C. (2010) The pursuit of happiness: time, money, and social connection. Psychological science : a journal of the Association for Psychological Science/ APS. PMID: 20732902  

  • October 14, 2010
  • 05:25 AM
  • 437 views

War crimes and the ruin of law

by SAGE Insight in SAGE Insight

From Millennium – Journal of International Studies The Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) has acted as a prototype for international criminal justice in the aftermath of violent conflict and stated that ‘those who perpetrate horrific war crimes, genocide, and crimes against humanity will not go unpunished’. It poses the question if such differentiation [...]... Read more »

Dauphinee, E. (2008) War Crimes and the Ruin of Law. Millennium - Journal of International Studies, 37(1), 49-67. DOI: 10.1177/0305829808093730  

  • October 13, 2010
  • 10:59 PM
  • 537 views

The ultimate cause of social disparity in preventative health behavior may be rooted in environmental harm

by Phil Camill in Global Change: Intersection of Nature and Culture

In a fascinating new article in PLOS One (open access), Daniel Nettle asks why we see social gradients in preventative health behaviors:
People of lower socioeconomic position have been found to smoke more, exercise less, have poorer diets, comply less well with therapy, use medical services less, adopt fewer safety measures, ignore health advice more, and [...]... Read more »

  • October 13, 2010
  • 11:55 AM
  • 722 views

Defending the Sensible: Charles Darwin and the Anti-Vivisection Controversy

by Eric Michael Johnson in The Primate Diaries

The latest stop in the #PDEx tour is being hosted at The Dispersal of Darwin:According to the British Medical Journal it resembled a crucifixion. The dogs were strapped to boards, backs down, and with their legs cinched outwards. In the stifling August heat their heavy panting was made only more intense by a suffocating fear. The accused was described as wearing a white apron “that was afterwards covered with blood” as he approached one of the struggling animals. His mouth was tied shut but ........ Read more »

Feller, D. (2009) Dog fight: Darwin as animal advocate in the antivivisection controversy of 1875. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, 40(4), 265-271. DOI: 10.1016/j.shpsc.2009.09.004  

  • October 13, 2010
  • 11:55 AM
  • 602 views

Defending the Sensible: Charles Darwin and the Anti-Vivisection Controversy

by Eric Michael Johnson in The Primate Diaries in Exile

The latest stop in the #PDEx tour is being hosted at The Dispersal of Darwin:According to the British Medical Journal it resembled a crucifixion. The dogs were strapped to boards, backs down, and with their legs cinched outwards. In the stifling August heat their heavy panting was made only more intense by a suffocating fear. The accused was described as wearing a white apron “that was afterwards covered with blood” as he approached one of the struggling animals. His mouth was tied shut but ........ Read more »

Feller, D. (2009) Dog fight: Darwin as animal advocate in the antivivisection controversy of 1875. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, 40(4), 265-271. DOI: 10.1016/j.shpsc.2009.09.004  

  • October 13, 2010
  • 05:20 AM
  • 551 views

Male—female pay disparities in Federal employment

by SAGE Insight in SAGE Insight

A major difference? Fields of study and male—female pay differences in federal employment From The American Review of Public Administration Why do men still earn more than equally experienced and educated women in the federal service? This article examines how male–female differences in work experience and education affect pay disparities among college graduates in the federal [...]... Read more »

  • October 13, 2010
  • 03:20 AM
  • 522 views

The History of Smoking Bans & Anti-Smoking Sentiment

by John Wayland in The Darwin Tribune

In the opinion of this Editor, it seems that the smoking bans in force in various nations upon the globe, as well as anti-smoking lobbyists, are a modern occurance which have only popped up in the last few decades as research began to show the harmful effects of smoking, namely lung cancer.It was a suprise therefore to discover that there has been a long history of smoking bans, and anti-smoking sentiment. This article will attempt to explore some of the history of the smoking ban and anti-smoki........ Read more »

  • October 12, 2010
  • 06:01 PM
  • 568 views

New analysis of population trends and their impact on global greenhouse gas emissions

by Phil Camill in Global Change: Intersection of Nature and Culture


In 40 years, there will be about 3 billion additional people living on the Earth (~9.5 billion total) compared with today.   With all of these new folks, it’s easy to think about the added demands of energy, food, and water required to sustain their lifestyles.  And in terms of climate warming, it’s hard to escape [...]... Read more »

O'Neill, B., Dalton, M., Fuchs, R., Jiang, L., Pachauri, S., & Zigova, K. (2010) Global demographic trends and future carbon emissions. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 107(41), 17521-17526. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1004581107  

  • October 12, 2010
  • 09:25 AM
  • 516 views

Can Video Games Train Your Brain?

by APS Daily Observations in Daily Observations

On September 30, the Marian Koshland Science Museum in Washington, DC, held an interactive lecture which posed the question: “Can you train your neural pathways to stay active and strong ... Read more »

  • October 12, 2010
  • 05:30 AM
  • 310 views

Pakistan’s nuclear weapons program and implications for US national security

by SAGE Insight in SAGE Insight

From International Relations Pakistan’s nuclear weapons program causes concern for a variety of reasons and in particular generates threats to US national security. This article outlines how the deep animosity between Pakistan and India has been a key driving force behind the nuclear program. They have fought three major wars against each other: India is [...]... Read more »

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