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  • June 11, 2011
  • 01:20 PM
  • 747 views

Pharmaceuticals And Violence

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic

A French study reveals which medications are most often associated with violence and aggression: Prescribed drugs and violence.The authors trawled the French records of drug side effects from 1985 to 2008. By law, doctors in France must report any adverse event which is either serious, or unexpected, to the authorities.They found a total of 540 reports mentioning "violence", but only 56 of these were clear-cut incidents of physical aggression towards others. Suicide and self-harm were not includ........ Read more »

Rouve N, Bagheri H, Telmon N, Pathak A, Franchitto N, Schmitt L, Rougé D, Lapeyre-Mestre M, Montastruc JL, & the French Association of Regional PharmacoVigilance Centres. (2011) Prescribed drugs and violence: a case/noncase study in the French PharmacoVigilance Database. European journal of clinical pharmacology. PMID: 21655992  

  • June 10, 2011
  • 03:00 PM
  • 1,307 views

Too Many Laws

by Paul Statt in Paul Statt Communications

Research on health effects of distracted driving laws demonstrates that George Soros is right: " thinking has a manipulative function as well as a cognitive one"... Read more »

Ibrahim, J., Anderson, E., Burris, S., & Wagenaar, A. (2011) State Laws Restricting Driver Use of Mobile Communications Devices. American Journal of Preventive Medicine, 40(6), 659-665. DOI: 10.1016/j.amepre.2011.02.024  

  • June 10, 2011
  • 01:41 PM
  • 1,115 views

Weiners and War Chiefs

by Cris Campbell in Genealogy of Religion

By most accounts, Anthony Weiner thinks highly of himself. Filled with bravado, Weiner considers himself to be a political warrior. Regaling one 17 year old girl with stories about congressional battles, he likened himself to Superman: “I came back strong. Large. In charge. Tights and cape shit.” Weiner even took cape-less photos of his pecs [...]... Read more »

  • June 10, 2011
  • 11:15 AM
  • 878 views

You probably think this post is about you…

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

Carly Simon wailed this song back in the 1970’s. Listening to it now, it’s still catchy and seductive. Likely because now I know what it really means to interact with narcissists. We’ve written before about preparation of the narcissistic witness and cross examination of the same types. We often assume the narcissist is unaware of how [...]


Related posts:Tattoos: When should you clean up your witness?
Maybe you better sweat the small stuff…
“The glasses create a kind of unspoken........ Read more »

  • June 10, 2011
  • 05:51 AM
  • 1,093 views

Evolution and obesity

by Jason Collins in Evolving Economics

As I indicated in my recent post on Rob Brooks’s Sex, Genes & Rock ‘n’ Roll, Brooks devotes some time to the issue of obesity (his book is slowly appearing for sale on international sites – such as Amazon UK). Rob has also blogged about obesity and published a paper with Steve Simpson and David [...]... Read more »

  • June 10, 2011
  • 03:19 AM
  • 998 views

Friday Fun: My "Favorite" Comments From Anonymous Reviewers

by Psych Your Mind in Psych Your Mind

This Friday I thought it might be nice to provide a window into the manuscript review process in psychology. In short, after a researcher (1) designs a handful of studies (typically without much success), (2) finally discovers a finding that is interesting (months to years later), and (3) survives what is (typically) a hyper-critical vetting from among his/her research peers within the home University, it is now time to take on the empirical review process!

The review process is pretty simple f........ Read more »

Kassirer JP, & Campion EW. (1994) Peer review. Crude and understudied, but indispensable. JAMA : the journal of the American Medical Association, 272(2), 96-7. PMID: 8015140  

  • June 9, 2011
  • 05:14 PM
  • 1,340 views

The Leper Warrior: Persistence of Racial Terminology in Biological Anthropology

by Kristina Killgrove in Powered By Osteons

A few months ago, the news media carried a story about "Bones of Leper Warrior found in Medieval Cemetery" in central Italy.  The publication by Mauro Rubini and Paola Zaio was in early view at the time and was just published in the July issue of the Journal of Archaeological Science (see citation below). I noticed that Katy Meyers blogged about it today over at Bones Don't Lie, but I'm afraid I can't be as charitable as she is in pointing out the flaws.



8th c Avar Warrior
(credit: Wiki........ Read more »

M. Rubini, & P. Zaio. (2011) Warriors from the East. Skeletal evidence of warfare from a Lombard-Avar cemetery in central Italy (Campochiaro, Molise, 6th-8th century AD). Journal of Archaeological Science, 38(7), 1551-1559. info:/http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jas.2011.02.020

K. Killgrove. (2009) Rethinking taxonomies: skeletal variation on the North Carolina coastal plain. Southeastern Archaeology, 28(1), 87-100. info:other/

  • June 8, 2011
  • 09:44 PM
  • 1,608 views

Gould's Straw Man

by Kristina Killgrove in Powered By Osteons

Stephen Jay Gould famously argued in his best-known work, The Mismeasure of Man, that Samuel Morton unconsciously manipulated his data on cranial capacity in different populations to fit his own preconceived, racist notions about human variation.  Gould undertook a reanalysis of Morton's data and leveled a variety of accusations against Morton: he incorrectly measured skulls, made mathematical errors, picked and chose his sample populations, and didn't report all of the data he collected.  I w........ Read more »

J.E. Lewis, D. DeGusta, M.R. Meyer, J.M. Monge, A.E. Mann, & R.L. Holloway. (2011) The Mismeasure of Science: Stephen Jay Gould versus Samuel George Morton on Skulls and Bias. PLoS Biology, 9(6). info:/10.1371/journal.pbio.1001071

  • June 8, 2011
  • 07:21 PM
  • 612 views

Tell Your Patent Invention Story In a Way That is Worth Copyrighting

by Persuasion Strategies in Persuasive Litigator

By Dr. Ken Broda-Bahm - Last month, Uniloc USA lost a multiyear battle against Microsoft to preserve a $388 million jury award against the software giant, and will now be retrying the patent infringement case on damages alone. One thing Uniloc has in its corner for retrial is a compelling invention story: a plucky Australian inventor working since the early 90's to figure out how to prevent the ubiquitous practice of copying software to multiple machines, only to see his novel solution incorpora........ Read more »

Christopher Anthony Cotropia . (2008) Copying in Patent Law . North Carolina Law Review, 1421. info:/

  • June 8, 2011
  • 04:27 PM
  • 1,507 views

Crazy Corn Children & Ritual Form

by Cris Campbell in Genealogy of Religion

In 1977, Stephen King published his short story “Children of the Corn” in Penthouse. Seven years later, movie audiences across the nation were horrified by the ritual doings of small town Nebraska kids who worshiped something malevolent in the corn.
It surely was no coincidence that later in the year, Nebraska experienced a sharp drop in [...]... Read more »

  • June 8, 2011
  • 10:34 AM
  • 1,131 views

Interested in doing a postdoc in music cognition?

by Henkjan Honing in Music Matters

Postdoc in Music Cognition Vacancy... Read more »

  • June 8, 2011
  • 07:02 AM
  • 1,419 views

Foot in mouth? Rate of speech, verb choice, and calling women “guys”

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

Everything you say is evidence for judgment.  But we are steadfast in our desire to help you keep track of how to say it and what not to say. So here are three new sources to help you watch your mouth. Rate of speech You know the stereotype of the ‘smooth talker’. We tend to [...]


Related posts:Okay, wait! Which one of you was I listening to?
Women are soft (and sweet) and men are hard (and tough)
Men prefer boxes and women prefer ellipses?
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  • June 7, 2011
  • 07:30 PM
  • 1,050 views

Colin Firth's first scientific paper

by Eva Amsen in Expression Patterns

Colin Firth is having a pretty good year. First he won an Oscar for the King's Speech, and now he also has a paper out in Current Biology! When guest editing Radio 4's Today programme in December, he suggested that...... Read more »

Ryota Kanai, Tom Feilden, Colin Firth, Geraint Rees. (2011) Political Orientations Are Correlated with Brain Structure in Young Adults. Current Biology, 21(8), 677-680. info:/10.1016/j.cub.2011.03.017

  • June 7, 2011
  • 06:02 PM
  • 1,335 views

Envying Evolution: What Can The X-Men Teach Us About Stereotypes?

by Melanie Tannenbaum in PsySociety

This weekend marked the opening of X-Men: First Class, prequel to (and assumed reboot of) the wildly successful X-Men movie franchise. For those who are unfamiliar with the X-Men series, the stories revolve around groups of ‘mutants,’ super-powered beings who … Continue reading →... Read more »

  • June 7, 2011
  • 05:36 PM
  • 1,498 views

Religion as a tool for social control

by Tom Rees in Epiphenom

According to a new study just published in Science, societies can be spread along a spectrum of how tight their social control is:

... tight nations are more likely to have autocratic governing systems that suppress dissent, to have media institutions (broadcast, paper, Internet) with restricted content and more laws and controls, and to have criminal justice systems with higher monitoring, more severe punishment (e.g., the death penalty), and greater deterrence and control of crime.A team lead........ Read more »

Gelfand MJ, Raver JL, Nishii L, & others. (2011) Differences between tight and loose cultures: a 33-nation study. Science (New York, N.Y.), 332(6033), 1100-4. PMID: 21617077  

  • June 7, 2011
  • 12:15 PM
  • 2,400 views

"What Have I Done?"—The Nature of Regret

by Krystal D'Costa in Anthropology in Practice


We've all been there—the "Oh, [expletive]" moment. Perhaps the door just shut and your keys are still sitting on the counter. Or you get to the subway/bus stop just as your mass transit mode of choice is pulling away. Perhaps you've left your wallet at home, and there are blue lights flashing in your rear view mirror. Or maybe your expletive moment is a bit darker: a broken promise, a hurt friend, or a damaged relationship through some fault of your own. After all, regret is all about you and........ Read more »

Gilbert DT, Morewedge CK, Risen JL, & Wilson TD. (2004) Looking Forward to Looking Backward: The Misprediction of Regret. Psychological science, 15(5), 346-50. PMID: 15102146  

John Sabini and Maury Silver. (2005) Why Emotion Names and Experiences Don't Neatly Pair. Psychological Inquiry, 16(1), 1-10. info:/

Schlenker, Barry, & Darby, Bruce. (1981) The Use of Apologies in Social Predicaments. Social Psychology Quarterly, 44(3), 271-278. DOI: 10.2307/3033840  

  • June 7, 2011
  • 11:49 AM
  • 1,071 views

Britain's Not Getting More Mentally Ill

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic

There's a widespread belief that mental illness is getting more common, or that it has got more common in recent years.A new study in the British Journal of Psychiatry says: no, it's not. They looked at the UK APMS mental health surveys, which were done in 1993, 2000 and 2007. Long-time readers will remember these.The authors of the new paper analyzed the data by birth cohort, i.e. when you were born, and by age at the time of the survey. If mental illness were rising, you'd predict that people ........ Read more »

  • June 7, 2011
  • 03:00 AM
  • 738 views

The digital democracy of the internet and the publicity of openness

by SAGE Insight in SAGE Insight

A very popular blog: the internet and the possibilities of publicity From New Media & Society This article outlines how the mediums of traditional broadcast and the internet have different publicity possibilities. It is clear that the structure of the internet makes it particularly good at developing a publicity of openness and traditional media is [...]... Read more »

Brenton J. Malin. (2011) A very popular blog: The internet and the possibilities of publicity. New Media , 13 (2). info:/

  • June 6, 2011
  • 11:08 AM
  • 1,256 views

Foreign Ideas & Moral Indigestion

by Cris Campbell in Genealogy of Religion

Imagine you are dining at a friend’s home. Your host is excited because she has prepared a special dish for you. When dinner is finally served, you are surprised to see a whole egg on your plate and when you open the egg, you are even more surprised to see this:
That’s balut, a dish of [...]... Read more »

Ritter, Ryan, & Preston, Jesse Lee. (2011) Gross gods and icky atheism: Disgust responses to rejected religious beliefs. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology. info:/10.1016/j.jesp.2011.05.006

  • June 6, 2011
  • 07:02 AM
  • 1,382 views

How I assess your status (or lack thereof) at a glance

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

We spend a lot of time trying to sort out how jurors will respond to witnesses. And sometimes we learn things we were not expecting. We love that. So here are a few new research findings that speak to the power of first impressions and to the effective preparation of witnesses. Pride yourself on looking young? [...]


Related posts:Beauty is only skin deep but the lack of beauty lands you in jail!
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