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  • March 15, 2011
  • 08:27 AM
  • 1,535 views

Success: what is it and how do you achieve it?

by David Winter in Careers - in Theory

Are you successful in your career? How do you know? Traditionally, there are two ways of measuring career success: objective success — externally measurable things such as salary level, number of promotions, etc. subjective success — internal, psychological factors, such as level of career satisfaction, happiness, etc. These two types of success can sometimes be [...]... Read more »

  • March 15, 2011
  • 08:23 AM
  • 768 views

by Geraint Johnes in Geraint Johnes Weblog

Recent developments in macroeconomics have focused on models based on dynamic stochastic general equilibrium (DSGE). These models are characterised by a set of macroeconomic relationships which are built up from consistent microeconomic foundations. Their microeconomic underpinnings are intended to finesse the criticism raised by Lucas that changes in policy beget changes in the behaviour of microeconomic agents thereby posing a challenge to economic forecasters. DSGE models come in a variety of........ Read more »

  • March 15, 2011
  • 06:11 AM
  • 1,451 views

Visualizing the risk of global sourcing

by Jan Husdal in husdal.com

A picture says more than a thousand words, and here is one paper that has it all and that literally illustrates the differences between different sourcing strategies. The paper defines three basic cost elements in global sourcing: static, dynamic and hidden cost, and uses this framework to assess the costs and risks inherent in global sourcing scenarios from three different points of view: conceptually, analytically and empirically. It is paper shows how brings the message across of where to so........ Read more »

Holweg, M., Reichhart, A., & Hong, E. (2010) On risk and cost in global sourcing☆. International Journal of Production Economics. DOI: 10.1016/j.ijpe.2010.04.003  

  • March 14, 2011
  • 08:40 PM
  • 1,698 views

Bad Science: Idiots and Ecstasy

by Neurobonkers in Neurobonkers

do_sud_thumb("http://neurobonkers.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/thestupiditburnsmini.jpg","Bad Science: Idiots and Ecstasy")... Read more »

Halpern JH, Sherwood AR, Hudson JI, Gruber S, Kozin D, & Pope HG Jr. (2011) Residual neurocognitive features of long-term ecstasy users with minimal exposure to other drugs. Addiction (Abingdon, England), 106(4), 777-86. PMID: 21205042  

Insel TR, Battaglia G, Johannessen JN, Marra S, & De Souza EB. (1989) 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine ("ecstasy") selectively destroys brain serotonin terminals in rhesus monkeys. The Journal of pharmacology and experimental therapeutics, 249(3), 713-20. PMID: 2471824  

  • March 14, 2011
  • 11:53 AM
  • 1,518 views

The ties that bind - healthy eating policies, agriculture, the economy, and population health

by Megan Carter in Verdant Nation

I am no economics expert nor claim to have all that much knowledge about ‘the economy;’ I have troubles simply deciding where to invest. However, from a population health perspective, I was so intrigued with this recent Lancet article in the series “Chronic Diseases and Development” that I wanted to share it with it you. It highlights the inextricable and complex connections between the global economy (specifically agri-trade), our food consumption patterns, and health – something that........ Read more »

Lock, K., Smith, R., Dangour, A., Keogh-Brown, M., Pigatto, G., Hawkes, C., Fisberg, R., & Chalabi, Z. (2010) Health, agricultural, and economic effects of adoption of healthy diet recommendations. The Lancet, 376(9753), 1699-1709. DOI: 10.1016/s0140-6736(10)61352-9  

  • March 14, 2011
  • 10:21 AM
  • 1,267 views

Settle Your Case Without Setting the Dominoes in Motion: Research on the Demonstration Effect

by Persuasion Strategies in Persuasive Litigator

The recent turmoil and uprisings across North Africa and the Middle East provide a good example of the "demonstration effect," which is an influential factor for many litigators and general counsels assessing their case. What about one's success enables others to act and what can you do to stop the dominoes from falling? ... Read more »

  • March 14, 2011
  • 07:02 AM
  • 1,466 views

We don’t need another hero

by Rita Handrich in The Jury Room

If you do something wrong (and you get caught) it is better to play the victim than to assert your previous good deeds. We’ve written about this principle before here and here. But that was more about how your past good deeds would not buy you a good public (or courtroom) evaluation if you (like [...]


Related posts:Martin Luther King, Jr. & Eliot Spitzer: On letting people off the hook [Part II]:
Who was hurt? That’s how we know just whom to blame…
The Jury Room: A new blawg
... Read more »

Kurt Gray, & Daniel M. Wegner. (2011) To escape blame, don't be a hero—Be a victim. Journal of Experimental Psychology. info:/

  • March 14, 2011
  • 02:04 AM
  • 876 views

Science in Film

by Paige Brown in From The Lab Bench

Name Best and Worst Science-Based Movies

http://network.nature.com/groups/scienceinfilm/forum/topics... Read more »

  • March 13, 2011
  • 04:30 PM
  • 1,377 views

Rape Myth #1: She's Probably Lying

by Stephanie Zvan in Almost Diamonds

Tawana Brawley. Duke University men's lacrosse team.If you see a rape allegation in the news, those words aren't far behind. They are talismans, touchstones for the idea that we must never, ever forget that women lie about rape. These women lied; therefore, women lie.The truth is, of course, that some women do lie about having been raped. That shouldn't surprise us. People make false accusations about every type of crime, even murder, where it is excruciatingly difficult to do. If no woman ever ........ Read more »

  • March 12, 2011
  • 05:57 PM
  • 1,328 views

Bowling together... in most of Europe, at least

by Tom Rees in Epiphenom

Ten years ago, the sociologist Robert Putnam created shockwaves with his analysis of the breakdown of US society in recent decades -

We sign fewer petitions, belong to fewer organizations that meet, know our neighbors less, meet with friends less frequently, and even socialize with our families less often. We're even bowling alone [Source: Bowling Alone].

Putnam's analysis of the causes was pretty nuanced (read: no-one really knows), but he did point out that the decline of religion in the US ........ Read more »

  • March 12, 2011
  • 08:45 AM
  • 1,162 views

The evolution of female intentionality

by Vahid Motlagh in Ideas for a deeper sense of life

One of the critical aspects regarding the “evolution itself evolving” is the emergence of the female expressed and not simply silent intentionality.In my recent article about the alternative futures of Asia in the year 2060 I highlighted the rise and contribution of female consciousness as a mega trend which will continue to reshape our world in the coming decades. Even a critical question that is raised today after the domino revolutions across the Middle East and North Africa is that if an........ Read more »

Motlagh VV. (2010) Asia's Exotic Futures in the Far beyond the Present. Journal of Futures Studies, 15(2), 1-16. info:/

Gur RC, Gunning-Dixon F, Bilker WB, & Gur RE. (2002) Sex differences in temporo-limbic and frontal brain volumes of healthy adults. Cerebral cortex (New York, N.Y. : 1991), 12(9), 998-1003. PMID: 12183399  

Acevedo BP, Aron A, Fisher HE, & Brown LL. (2011) Neural correlates of long-term intense romantic love. Social cognitive and affective neuroscience. PMID: 21208991  

  • March 11, 2011
  • 06:23 PM
  • 1,545 views

The Magic of Contagion

by Cris Campbell in Genealogy of Religion

What makes people pay large sums of money for apparently mundane objects such as JFK’s golf clubs ($772,500 at auction) and rocking chair ($453,500)? Although a portion of the price is related to investment value, this cannot account for the exorbitant amounts paid for these items. Something else is at work. According to a study [...]... Read more »

Newman, George, Diesendruck, Gil, and Bloom, Paul. (2011) Celebrity Contagion and the Value of Objects. Journal of Consumer Research. info:/10.1086/658999

Curtis V, & Biran A. (2001) Dirt, Disgust, and Disease: Is Hygiene in Our Genes?. Perspectives in biology and medicine, 44(1), 17-31. PMID: 11253302  

  • March 11, 2011
  • 03:56 PM
  • 1,319 views

Penis Spines, Pearly Papules, and Pope Benedict's Balls

by Eric Michael Johnson in The Primate Diaries

The latest stop in the #PDEx tour is being hosted by A Primate of Modern Aspect:A new study in the journal Nature has generated a great deal of titillation this week as Cory McLean and colleagues have revealed a sequence of DNA that promotes these penis spines, a sequence that humans appear to have lost. The genetic mechanism involved has already been explained extremely well by Ed Yong and John Hawks. However, the interpretation of what the loss of this DNA reveals about human evolution is perh........ Read more »

McLean, C., Reno, P., Pollen, A., Bassan, A., Capellini, T., Guenther, C., Indjeian, V., Lim, X., Menke, D., Schaar, B.... (2011) Human-specific loss of regulatory DNA and the evolution of human-specific traits. Nature, 471(7337), 216-219. DOI: 10.1038/nature09774  

  • March 11, 2011
  • 03:56 PM
  • 1,177 views

Penis Spines, Pearly Papules, and Pope Benedict's Balls

by Eric Michael Johnson in The Primate Diaries in Exile

The latest stop in the #PDEx tour is being hosted by A Primate of Modern Aspect:A new study in the journal Nature has generated a great deal of titillation this week as Cory McLean and colleagues have revealed a sequence of DNA that promotes these penis spines, a sequence that humans appear to have lost. The genetic mechanism involved has already been explained extremely well by Ed Yong and John Hawks. However, the interpretation of what the loss of this DNA reveals about human evolution is perh........ Read more »

McLean, C., Reno, P., Pollen, A., Bassan, A., Capellini, T., Guenther, C., Indjeian, V., Lim, X., Menke, D., Schaar, B.... (2011) Human-specific loss of regulatory DNA and the evolution of human-specific traits. Nature, 471(7337), 216-219. DOI: 10.1038/nature09774  

  • March 11, 2011
  • 02:59 PM
  • 1,616 views

Penis Spines, Pearly Papules, and Pope Benedict’s Balls

by zinjanthropus in A Primate of Modern Aspect

The following guest post by Eric Michael Johnson is part of the Primate Diaries in Exile blog tour. You can follow other stops on this tour through his RSS feed or by following him on Twitter. If this is your first time visiting A Primate of Modern Aspect make sure to browse some of the [...]... Read more »

McLean, C., Reno, P., Pollen, A., Bassan, A., Capellini, T., Guenther, C., Indjeian, V., Lim, X., Menke, D., Schaar, B.... (2011) Human-specific loss of regulatory DNA and the evolution of human-specific traits. Nature, 471(7337), 216-219. DOI: 10.1038/nature09774  

  • March 11, 2011
  • 07:01 AM
  • 1,832 views

But, your honor! That witness was drunk!

by Doug Keene in The Jury Room

You’ve probably seen intoxicated witnesses on TV shows and thought they were ridiculous. And we’ve seen mock jurors dismiss witnesses they believed to be either drunk or high. But have we given the intoxicated witness a bum rap? New research says maybe we really have. Researchers from Florida, Texas and Arkansas took a look at [...]


Related posts:“I can look into his eyes and just tell he is lying”
Tattoos: When should you clean up your witness?
Witness Preparation: First impressions R........ Read more »

Schreiber Compo N, Evans JR, Carol RN, Villalba D, Ham LS, Garcia T, & Rose S. (2011) Intoxicated Eyewitnesses: Better than Their Reputation?. Law and human behavior. PMID: 21336684  

  • March 10, 2011
  • 02:20 PM
  • 1,095 views

Depressed Or Bereaved? (Part 1)

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic

My cat died on Tuesday. She may have been a manipulative psychopath, but she was a likeable one. She was 18.On that note, here's a paper about bereavement.It's been recognized since forever that clinical depression is similar, in many ways, to the experience of grief. Freud wrote about it in 1917, and it was an ancient idea even then. So psychiatrists have long thought that symptoms, which would indicate depression in someone who wasn't bereaved, can be quite normal and healthy as a response to ........ Read more »

  • March 10, 2011
  • 08:39 AM
  • 1,098 views

Unemployment Kills Men Dead

by Ultimo167 in Strong Silent Types

Saying as is so often said that men take unemployment harder than women do is to venture down a pathway of archaic ideas, upon which route some unsettling propositions are dug up for review. For example, if work allegedly has more meaning to men then it must have less meaning to women? And could that be because men are supposed to be out at work, working and women at home, caring, cooking and cleaning? ... Read more »

  • March 10, 2011
  • 07:00 AM
  • 2,104 views

Building Policies for Stewardship

by Bluegrass Blue Crab in Southern Fried Science

A dream? tomschlueter.blogspot.com We as humans and especially here at SFS like to picture an ideal government and hope that as we learn more about science and political theory, government can take steps in that direction. By any measure, governance within the United States is far from meeting the theoretical ideal. Implementation and [...]... Read more »

  • March 10, 2011
  • 04:57 AM
  • 1,372 views

An adaptive fairytale with no happy ending

by Jeremy Yoder in Denim and Tweed

The evolution of human traits and behaviors is, as I've noted before, a contentious and personal subject. This is enough of a problem when there's some data to inform the contentiousness. In the absence of meaningful data, it's downright dangerous.

Take, for instance, Jesse Bering's recent post about the evolution of homophobia, which Steve Silberman just pointed out to me.

.flickr-photo { }.flickr-framewide { float: right; text-align: left; margin-left: 15px; margin-bottom: 15px; width:100%;}........ Read more »

Young, K., Brodie, E.D., Jr., & Brodie, E.D., III. (2004) How the horned lizard got its horns. Science, 304(5667), 65. DOI: 10.1126/science.1094790  

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