Post List

Research / Scholarship posts

(Modify Search »)

  • March 3, 2014
  • 11:58 PM
  • 379 views

Pulmonary Hypertension in the RASopathies

by JCVM in JScholar Publishers

The RASopathies are a class of developmental disorders caused by a genetic mutation in the Ras signaling pathway and associated mitogen-activated protein kinases that control the cell cycle, differentiation and senescence. These diseases encompass a diverse set of clinical syndromes including neurofibromatosis type 1 and Noonan syndrome. Although the pathophysiological manifestations of these conditions are diverse, they share some common phenotypic features. The prevalence of pulmonary hypertension in the RASopathies is not well established as compared to cardiac and neurocognitive impairments. This paper reviews the cases of pulmonary hypertension in these member syndromes. Due to the aggressive and often fatal nature of pulmonary hypertension, a diagnosis of a RASopathy should also include screening for pulmonary hypertension.... Read more »

Krishna S. Vyas, Jacqueline A. Noonan. (2014) Pulmonary Hypertension in the RASopathies. Journal of Cardiology and Vascular Medicine, 2(1), 1-6. info:/2: 101

  • March 3, 2014
  • 12:04 AM
  • 399 views

Influence of Temperature on Calcium Carbonate Polymorph formed from Ammonium Carbonate and Calcium Acetate

by JNSM in JScholar Publishers

This research used ammonium carbonate and calcium acetate in the preparation of various calcium carbonate polymorphs for biomimetic composite applications. Biominerals were synthesized at temperatures ranging from 25 to 80 °C to investigate the effect of synthesis temperature on the abundance of vaterite, aragonite, and calcite, delineating regions that are favorable for the formation of these different calcium carbonate polymorphs... Read more »

Philip G Malone, Kevin Torres-Cancel, Robert D Moser, Allison PG, Rae Gore E, Mei Q Chandler, Charles A Weiss, Jr.*. (2014) Influence of Temperature on Calcium Carbonate Polymorph formed from Ammonium Carbonate and Calcium Acetate. Journal of Nanotechnology and Smart Materials, 1(1), 1-6. info:/1: 105

  • March 2, 2014
  • 12:13 AM
  • 442 views

Tree types of audience

by Olga Vovk in Milchstraße

Interestingly enough, as soon as one starts answering audience analysis questions, one realizes that there is more than one potential audience. Sometimes one can count 3 to 6 (and even more) different groups of people who made up for different audiences. Yes they all will read your communication.... Read more »

Carrie Ann Koplinka-Loehr. (1984) The Use of Educational Theory in Science Writing: Audience Analysis and Accommodation. Cornell University. info:/

Butcher, G. (2005) Using audience analysis in the development of web sites. American Geophysical Union, Fall Meeting. info:other/#ED53B-01

  • March 1, 2014
  • 04:09 PM
  • 511 views

Forensic Anthropology and Race

by Alexis Delanoir in How to Paint Your Panda

Why are forensic anthropologists so good at identifying race? The reason a forensic anthropologist can identify "race" with a high level of confidence can be narrowed down to two things: (1) a preconception of what "race" is, and (2) an informative prior. This post reviews several studies to clear the water of any misconceptions over whether or not forensic anthropology justifies the biological concept of "race."... Read more »

  • March 1, 2014
  • 04:01 AM
  • 314 views

New Article: Opening Teaching Landscapes

by Ernesto Priego in ePriego

I collaborated with Javiera Atenas (UCL) and Leo Havemann (Birkbeck) in an article now out on Open Praxis, a peer-reviewed open access scholarly journal focusing on research and innovation in open, distance and flexible education. It is published by the International Council for Open and Distance Education - ICDE.... Read more »

Javiera Atenas, Leo Havemann, & Ernesto Priego. (2014) Opening teaching landscapes: The importance of quality assurance in the delivery of open educational resources. Open Praxis, 6(1), 29-43. info:/http://dx.doi.org/10.5944/openpraxis.6.1.81

  • March 1, 2014
  • 01:26 AM
  • 294 views

How real science labs work

by Patrick Mineault in xcorr

I was reading The Antidote – an excellent book on negative thinking, stoicism and the bankruptcy of self-help; via this post on the New Yorker – and I stumbled onto a paper by the psychologist Kevin Dunbar on how science is made. It’s an illuminating read. Dunbar followed 4 molecular biology lab for a year, […]... Read more »

Kevin Dunbar. (1995) How scientists really reason: Scientific reasoning in real-world laboratories. . The nature of insight, Sternberg, Robert J. (Ed); Davidson, Janet E. (Ed), 365-395. info:/

  • February 28, 2014
  • 10:53 PM
  • 403 views

Evaluation of Physicochemical Characteristics of Hydrophobically Modified Glycol Chitosan Nanoparticles and their Biocompatibility in Murine Osteosarcoma and Osteoblast-like Cells

by JNSM in JScholar Publishers

Glycol chitosan, a derivative of chitosan, can be hydrophobically modified by 5ß-cholanic acid to impart amphiphilic properties that enable the self-assembly into nanoparticles in aqueous media at neutral pH. This nanoparticle system has shown initial success as a therapeutic agent in several model cell culture systems, but little is known about its stability against enzymatic degradation. The goal of this research was therefore to investigate the physicochemical properties of hydrophobically modified glycol chitosan nanoparticles (CNP) under exposure to lysozyme, a ubiquitous mammalian enzyme. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) revealed that the CNP vehicles had an average hydrodynamic diameter of 288.6 nm... Read more »

Amanda Chin, Giulia Suarato, Yizhi Meng. (2014) Evaluation of Physicochemical Characteristics of Hydrophobically Modified Glycol Chitosan Nanoparticles and their Biocompatibility in Murine Osteosarcoma and Osteoblast-like Cells. Journal of Nanotechnology and Smart Materials, 1(1), 1-7. info:/1: 104

  • February 28, 2014
  • 08:01 AM
  • 579 views

REGENERATIVE MEDICINE AND YOU: GROWING LUNGS IN THE LAB

by Amy Swanston in Antisense Science

You might remember back in 2008 reading about how scientists had made a breakthrough in regenerative medicine by engineering a human trachea. Since then people have been wondering if the same principles could be applied to more complex body parts. The answer? Yes. Scientists in Texas have grown functioning lungs by using damaged ones as a scaffold to grow new tissue.... Read more »

Nichols JE, Niles JA, & Cortiella J. (2012) Production and utilization of acellular lung scaffolds in tissue engineering. Journal of cellular biochemistry, 113(7), 2185-92. PMID: 22573544  

  • February 27, 2014
  • 08:10 PM
  • 410 views

Hydrophobically Modified Glycol Chitosan Nanoparticles and their Biocompatibility in Murine Osteosarcoma and Osteoblast-like Cells

by JNSM in JScholar Publishers

Glycol chitosan, a derivative of chitosan, can be hydrophobically modified by 5ß-cholanic acid to impart amphiphilic properties that enable the self-assembly into nanoparticles in aqueous media at neutral pH. This nanoparticle system has shown initial success as a therapeutic agent in several model cell culture systems, but little is known about its stability against enzymatic degradation. The goal of this research was therefore to investigate the physicochemical properties of hydrophobically modified glycol chitosan nanoparticles (CNP) under exposure to lysozyme, a ubiquitous mammalian enzyme. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) revealed that the CNP vehicles had an average hydrodynamic diameter of 288.6 nm.... Read more »

Amanda Chin, Giulia Suarato, Yizhi Meng. (2014) Evaluation of Physicochemical Characteristics of Hydrophobically Modified Glycol Chitosan Nanoparticles and their Biocompatibility in Murine Osteosarcoma and Osteoblast-like Cells. Journal of Nanotechnology and Smart Materials, 1(1), 1-7. info:/1: 104

  • February 27, 2014
  • 12:39 AM
  • 492 views

Nanotechnology and Smart Materials for “More than Moore” – It’s a Small World After All!

by JNSM in JScholar Publishers

Ever since Gordon Moore fore told about the future of the integrated circuit (IC) back in 1965 [1], Moore’s law was not only an accurate forecast of the achievements that microelectronics community has made, but also was a yardstick of the appropriate level of the commercial development in microelectronics for the past five decades. Such an amazing pace of the IC technology development was possible essentially because of simple two-dimensional (2D) structure of the metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) field effect transistor (FET) invented by Hofstein and Heiman [2]. Putting more transistors in the same chip was possible simply by decreasing 2D feature size of the IC. The never-ending quest for ever and ever smaller feature size (another word, ever and ever increasing numbers of the transistors) in IC is stunning and gate insulation layer thickness today is only a few layers of oxide and the minimum feature size of the IC is sub-20 nm. While keeping this march becomes more challenging, there is no doubt that this amazing “more Moore” march will continue at least for a couple of more decades thanks to numerous innovations in materials, production technologies and a paradigm shift in design like FinFET [3]. However, “more Moore” by feature size reduction can only go so far and year after year we are getting one step closer to the physical limit.... Read more »

Jeong Bong Lee. (2014) Nanotechnology and Smart Materials for “More than Moore” – It’s a Small World After All!. Journal of Nanotechnology and Smart Materials, 1(1), 1-3. info:/1: 102

  • February 25, 2014
  • 11:47 PM
  • 381 views

Drug and Alcohol Consumption and Trade and HIV in the Caribbean: A Review of the Literature

by JAID in JScholar Publishers

This consultancy was granted by the Caribbean Health Research Council (CHRC) to assess the state of the literature on possible links between HIV spread and prevalence of drug and alcohol abuse and trade in the region. The methodology was that of a thematic search of existing literature in databases and books or journal publications. Online materials and UN agency reports of relevance were also consulted. Regular meetings were held with CHRC staff to review progress and edit drafts while staff of the university library went beyond the call of duty to support the project. The review of the literature indicates that many of the relevant publications were methodologically and theoretically weak perhaps because they were done by medical researchers who adopted social science methodology rather uncritically. Most of the research findings proved to be controversial, calling for more research in the Caribbean to firmly confirm or refute any hypothesized links between substance abuse or trade and HIV spread. We recommend that intervention experiments be conducted in the region with greater partnership between biomedical researchers and social scientists to test different hypotheses about causal links and therapeutic or preventive possibilities without criminal justice prejudice or stigma in order to help stem the tides of the epidemics in the region.... Read more »

Biko Agozino. (2013) Drug and Alcohol Consumption and Trade and HIV in the Caribbean: A Review of the Literature. Journal of HIV/AIDS , 1(2), 1-12. info:/Vol 1: 203

  • February 25, 2014
  • 10:24 PM
  • 334 views

Episode 23: Bigger IS Better!!!! (by~0.5%)

by On Your Mind in On Your Mind

  If there’s one thing we’ve learned about grad school, it’s that it’s often a humbling experience.  Well, that and never pass up an opportunity for free food.  Liam’s getting first-hand experience with all the ways to screw up a Western Blot but he’s not giving up!  Meanwhile, Kat’s taken a detour to catch up ...read moreThe post Episode 23: Bigger IS Better!!!! (by~0.5%) appeared first on On Your Mind Podcast.... Read more »

  • February 24, 2014
  • 03:06 PM
  • 312 views

Audience analysis – 1

by olga Vovk in Milchstraße

The audience analysis is an important task, which should be done at the very beginning of the writing process, but which is often overlooked in both scientific, technical, and technology writing.... Read more »

Carrie Ann Koplinka-Loehr. (1984) The Use of Educational Theory in Science Writing: Audience Analysis and Accommodation. Cornell University. info:/

  • February 24, 2014
  • 07:00 AM
  • 555 views

Biomass-based Nanocomposites and Mesoporous Materials

by JNSM in JScholar Publishers

The conversion of lignocellulosic biomass into fuels and chemicals has been rigorously investigated as a response to the depletion of petroleum resources, increasing demand for in oil and secure access to energy. It has been estimated that by 2030 lignocellulosic biomass could supply a substantial portion of the international chemical and transportation fuel market. Lignocellulosic biomass is usually composed of three components: 35-50 wt% cellulose, 20-40 wt% hemicellulose, and 10-25 wt% lignin. While lignocellulose is cheap and abundant forms of biomass, it is difficult to convert to target materials due to the high crystallinity structure and oxygen/carbon ratio. In order to increase the biomass conversion and upgrade bio-oil into fuels (green diesel) and chemicals, oxygen reduction and chemical bonding rearrangement are crucial. Lignocellulose can be depolymerized to C5/C6 fragment by hydrolysis using an acid catalyst such as HCl or H2SO4. Furfuryl alcohol (FA; C5H6O2) and hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF, C6H6O3), which can be produced from hemicellulose and cellulose, respectively, by dehydration and decomposition, have been identified as are considered to be a key furan derivatives.... Read more »

Tae Jin Kim. (2014) Biomass-based Nanocomposites and Mesoporous Materials. Journal of Nanotechnology and Smart Materials, 1(1), 1-2. info:/1: 103

  • February 22, 2014
  • 12:09 AM
  • 829 views

Prevalence and Determinants of Adherence to Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) amongst a Cohort of HIV Positive Women Accessing Treatment in a Tertiary Health Facility in Southern Nigeria

by JAID in JScholar Publishers

Optimal adherence to HAART amongst women living with HIV/AIDS (WLHIV) accounts for more than half of all new infections worldwide. This is particularly crucial for the success of HIV/AIDS treatment programs. In Nigeria, adherence amongst women has remained largely unexplored. This study aims to determine the prevalence and determinants of adherence to HAART amongst HIV positive non-pregnant women receiving treatment in a tertiary health facility in Cross River State, Nigeria... Read more »

Oku AO*, Owoaje ET, Oku OO, Monjok E. (2013) Prevalence and Determinants of Adherence to Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) amongst a Cohort of HIV Positive Women Accessing Treatment in a Tertiary Health Facility in Southern Nigeria. Journal of HIV/AIDS , 1(2), 1-7. info:/Vol 1: 202

  • February 21, 2014
  • 05:20 PM
  • 403 views

EXPERIMENTAL TECHNIQUES EXPLAINED: GENE SOE PCR.

by Ryan Sweet in Antisense Science

Sewing just got scientific. Buckle up.
Gene SOE is a laboratory technique used to ‘stitch’ two pieces of DNA together; why is it spelt ‘SOE’ I hear you cry? That can be your homework. It’s a mystery to me. What I do know is that this technique has been around since the 80’s and is useful for deleting/fusing two DNA fragments together to produce truncated (that means ‘shortened’) proteins and/or two proteins fused together. That’s all very nice, but how does it work?... Read more »

  • February 20, 2014
  • 04:54 PM
  • 295 views

The Changing Face of Science: Part Two

by Rebecca Schwarzlose in Garden of the Mind

How are social media and the Internet changing the way science is done? And what does that have to do with a dancing cockatoo?... Read more »

Patel, Aniruddh D., Iversen, John R., Bregman, Micah R., & Schulz, Irena. (2009) Experimental Evidence for Synchronization to a Musical Beat in a Nonhuman Animal. Current Biology, 19(10), 827-830. DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2009.03.038  

  • February 20, 2014
  • 04:35 PM
  • 332 views

The Importance of a Friend

by Alexis Delanoir in How to Paint Your Panda

A post exploring the psychological and medical benefits of having strong social relationships. Meta-analysis and further studies show that beyond the obvious psychological benefits of having friends, strong social relationships also confer longevity and increased likelihood of survival in situations of risked mortality.... Read more »

  • February 20, 2014
  • 08:00 AM
  • 511 views

Growing Skepticism about the Stem Cell Acid Trip

by Jalees Rehman in The Next Regeneration

In January 2014, the two papers “Stimulus-triggered fate conversion of somatic cells into pluripotency” and “Bidirectional developmental potential in reprogrammed cells with acquired pluripotency” published in the journal Nature by Haruko Obokata and colleagues took the world of stem cell research by surprise.... Read more »

Obokata H, Wakayama T, Sasai Y, Kojima K, Vacanti MP, Niwa H, Yamato M, & Vacanti CA. (2014) Stimulus-triggered fate conversion of somatic cells into pluripotency. Nature, 505(7485), 641-7. PMID: 24476887  

  • February 18, 2014
  • 07:32 AM
  • 357 views

Can bonobos synchronize to the beat?

by Henkjan Honing in Music Matters

Today the Daily Mail reports on an exciting new finding: Patricia Gray (University of North Carolina in Greensboro) and Ed Large (University of Connecticut) claim to have shown that bonobo's can synchronise to a beat.
... Read more »

join us!

Do you write about peer-reviewed research in your blog? Use ResearchBlogging.org to make it easy for your readers — and others from around the world — to find your serious posts about academic research.

If you don't have a blog, you can still use our site to learn about fascinating developments in cutting-edge research from around the world.

Register Now

Research Blogging is powered by SMG Technology.

To learn more, visit seedmediagroup.com.