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  • September 23, 2015
  • 03:27 PM
  • 583 views

What motivates ‘Facebook stalking’ after a romantic breakup?

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Social networking makes it easy to monitor the status and activities of a former romantic partner, an often unhealthy use of social media known as interpersonal electronic surveillance (IES) or, more commonly, “Facebook stalking.” Psychological and relationship factors and how individuals cope with the termination of a romantic relationship can help predict their use of online surveillance, according to a new study.... Read more »

  • September 23, 2015
  • 11:00 AM
  • 550 views

The BMJ requires data sharing to publish clinical trials

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

Increased publication of clinical trial outcomes has been promoted by regional and global initiatives in order to increase transparency, reproducibility and reliability of the assays. The BMJ follows this movement, becoming the first journal to require availability of individual patient data, anonymously and upon request, as a prerequisite for publication. … Read More →... Read more »

  • September 23, 2015
  • 07:39 AM
  • 448 views

What about Lignin?

by ragothamanyennamalli in Getting to know Structural Bioinformatics

Biofuel prodcution involves removing Lignin from the biomass, in fact efficient removal so that Lignin and its by-products do not inhibit the enzymatic process that follows. But, what happens to the Lignin? ... Read more »

Bourzac, K. (2015) Inner Workings: Paving with plants. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 112(38), 11743-11744. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1509010112  

  • September 22, 2015
  • 05:02 PM
  • 445 views

Genetic analysis supports prediction that spontaneous rare mutations cause half of autism

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

A team led by researchers at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) has published a new analysis of data on the genetics of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). One commonly held theory is that autism results from the chance combinations of commonly occurring gene mutations, which are otherwise harmless. But the authors’ work provides support for a different theory.... Read more »

Ivan Iossifov, Dan Levy, Jeremy Allen, Kenny Ye, Michael Ronemus, Yoon-ha Lee, Boris Yamrom, & Michael Wigler. (2015) Low load for disruptive mutations in autism genes and their biased transmission. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences in the United States of America. info:/

  • September 21, 2015
  • 02:18 PM
  • 425 views

‘Delayed remembering’: Kids can remember tomorrow what they forgot today

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

For adults, memories tend to fade with time. But a new study has shown that there are circumstances under which the opposite is true for small children: they can remember a piece of information better days later than they can on the day they first learned it. While playing a video game that asked them to remember associations between objects, 4- and 5-year-olds who re-played the game after a two-day delay scored more than 20 percent higher than kids who re-played it later the same day.... Read more »

Kevin Darby. (20115) ‘Delayed remembering’: kids can remember tomorrow what they forgot today. Psychological Science. info:/

  • September 20, 2015
  • 03:01 PM
  • 357 views

A barrier against brain stem cell aging

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Neural stem cells generate new neurons throughout life in the mammalian brain. However, with advancing age the potential for regeneration in the brain dramatically declines. Scientists now identified a novel mechanism of how neural stem cells stay relatively free of aging-induced damage. A diffusion barrier regulates the sorting of damaged proteins during cell division.... Read more »

Moore, D., Pilz, G., Arauzo-Bravo, M., Barral, Y., & Jessberger, S. (2015) A mechanism for the segregation of age in mammalian neural stem cells. Science, 349(6254), 1334-1338. DOI: 10.1126/science.aac9868  

  • September 19, 2015
  • 02:49 PM
  • 510 views

Schizophrenia: Repairing the brain

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Research led by scientists from Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore (Duke-NUS) has linked the abnormal behaviour of two genes (BDNF and DTNBP1) to the underlying cause of schizophrenia. These findings have provided a new target for schizophrenia treatment.... Read more »

  • September 18, 2015
  • 03:14 PM
  • 503 views

Types of athletic training affect how brain communicates with muscles

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Using endurance training or strength and resistance training not only prepares an athlete for different types of sports, they can also change the way the brain and muscles communicate with each other.... Read more »

  • September 17, 2015
  • 02:14 PM
  • 477 views

Vaccine clears some precancerous cervical lesions in clinical trial

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Scientists have used a genetically engineered vaccine to successfully eradicate high-grade precancerous cervical lesions in nearly one-half of women who received the vaccine in a clinical trial. The goal, say the scientists, was to find nonsurgical ways to treat precancerous lesions caused by HPV.... Read more »

  • September 17, 2015
  • 01:39 PM
  • 587 views

The favourable perception of open access increases among researchers

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

A research conducted by the Nature Publishing Group indicates that the perception of open access (OA) publishing is rapidly changing among researchers. In 2014, 40% of authors who have not published in OA journals declared themselves concerned about the quality of publications, a percentage which fell to 27% in 2015. The NPG supports OA publications and recognizes its importance, publishing 56% of the articles in this format. … Read More →... Read more »

  • September 16, 2015
  • 04:00 PM
  • 604 views

Immune system may be pathway between nature and good health

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Research has found evidence that spending time in nature provides protections against a startling range of diseases, including depression, diabetes, obesity, ADHD, cardiovascular disease, cancer, and many more. How this exposure to green space leads to better health has remained a mystery. After reviewing hundreds of studies examining nature’s effects on health, researchers believe the answer lies in nature’s ability to enhance the functioning of the body’s immune system.... Read more »

  • September 15, 2015
  • 02:47 PM
  • 418 views

Students in credit crisis

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

New research from the USA suggests that college students are well aware that they should be personally responsible for their finances, including their card obligations, but this awareness rarely correlates with limiting the debts they accrue during their time in higher education.... Read more »

  • September 14, 2015
  • 03:05 PM
  • 470 views

Viruses flourish in guts of healthy babies

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Bacteria aren't the only nonhuman invaders to colonize the gut shortly after a baby's birth. Viruses also set up house there, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. All together, these invisible residents are thought to play important roles in human health.... Read more »

Lim, E., Zhou, Y., Zhao, G., Bauer, I., Droit, L., Ndao, I., Warner, B., Tarr, P., Wang, D., & Holtz, L. (2015) Early life dynamics of the human gut virome and bacterial microbiome in infants. Nature Medicine. DOI: 10.1038/nm.3950  

  • September 13, 2015
  • 03:15 PM
  • 511 views

Concept Mapping vs. Retrieval Practice

by Joshua Fisher in Text Savvy

Although some relevant differences were not significant in this study, the effects reported in the previous studies, along with the time differentials in the conditions leads one to believe that, all other things being equal, retrieval practice is likely superior to concept mapping for learning (from texts).... Read more »

  • September 13, 2015
  • 02:51 PM
  • 5,544 views

Diet beverage drinkers compensate by eating unhealthy food

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Want fries with that diet soda? You aren’t alone, and you may not be “saving” as many calories as you think by consuming diet drinks. A new study that examined the dietary habits of more than 22,000 U.S. adults found that diet-beverage consumers may compensate for the absence of calories in their drinks by noshing on extra food that is loaded with sugar, sodium, fat and cholesterol.... Read more »

  • September 12, 2015
  • 03:37 PM
  • 5,611 views

Female mice sing for sex

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

They don’t use gondolas or croon like Sinatra. But scientists have known for a long time that male mice belt out something like love songs to females when the time seems right to them. What they didn’t know – until a University of Delaware researcher developed a sophisticated array of microphones and a sound analysis chamber – was that female mice were singing back.... Read more »

  • September 11, 2015
  • 06:06 PM
  • 5,624 views

Smart cells teach neurons damaged by Parkinson’s to heal themselves

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

As a potential treatment for Parkinson’s disease, scientists at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill have created smarter immune cells that produce and deliver a healing protein to the brain while also teaching neurons to begin making the protein for themselves.... Read more »

  • September 11, 2015
  • 03:16 PM
  • 5,573 views

An antibody that can attack HIV in new ways

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Proteins called broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) are a promising key to the prevention of infection by HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. bNAbs have been found in blood samples from some HIV patients whose immune systems can naturally control the infection. These antibodies may protect a patient’s healthy cells by recognizing a protein called the envelope spike, present on the surface of all HIV strains and inhibiting, or neutralizing, the effects of the virus. Now Caltech researchers have discovered that one particular bNAb may be able to recognize this signature protein, even as it takes on different conformations during infection–making it easier to detect and neutralize the viruses in an infected patient.... Read more »

  • September 11, 2015
  • 12:34 PM
  • 416 views

Perfect Pitch: Is this for real?

by Henkjan Honing in Music Matters

Absolute Pitch (AP) or Perfect Pitch, as some prefer to call it, is common throughout the animal world, and dogs are no exception (Levitin & Rogers, 2005).*... Read more »

Levitin, D., & Rogers, S. (2005) Absolute pitch: perception, coding, and controversies. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 9(1), 26-33. DOI: 10.1016/j.tics.2004.11.007  

  • September 10, 2015
  • 02:26 PM
  • 534 views

Physicists show ‘molecules’ made of light may be possible

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

It’s not lightsaber time… at least not yet. But a team including theoretical physicists from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has taken another step toward building objects out of photons, and the findings* hint that weightless particles of light can be joined into a sort of “molecule” with its own peculiar force.... Read more »

M. F. Maghrebi, M. J. Gullans, P. Bienias, S. Choi, I. Martin, O. Firstenberg, M. D. Lukin, H. P. Büchler, & A. V. Gorshkov. (2015) Coulomb bound states of strongly interacting photons. Physical Review Letters. arXiv: 1505.03859v1

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