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  • October 27, 2013
  • 05:59 AM
  • 360 views

Philippine language relations: Reply to comments…

by nath in Imprints of Philippine Science

First, a big thanks to everybody for being engaged in what I thought was just a simple map to visualize relationships …Continue reading »... Read more »

Bouchard-Côté A, Hall D, Griffiths TL, & Klein D. (2013) Automated reconstruction of ancient languages using probabilistic models of sound change. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 110(11), 4224-9. PMID: 23401532  

Atkinson, Q.D. (2013) The descent of words. PNAS, 4159-4160. info:/10.1073/pnas.1300397110

  • October 24, 2013
  • 04:16 AM
  • 551 views

Black Suits, Gowns, & Skin: SAT Scores by Income, Education, & Race

by nooffensebut in The Unsilenced Science

The latest SAT and ACT data show record declines for men, whites, and Native Americans. Analysis of state SAT data suggests that family income does not significantly affect scores when controlled for parents’ education and race.... Read more »

Anonymous. (2008) Why Family Income Differences Don't Explain the Racial Gap in SAT Scores. The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education, 10-12. info:/

  • October 22, 2013
  • 09:00 AM
  • 470 views

Brazilian bird sings Mozart?

by Henkjan Honing in Music Matters

Brazilian bird sings Mozart...... Read more »

Emily Doolittle, & Henrik Brumm. (2012) O Canto do Uirapuru: Consonant intervals and patterns in the song of the musician wren. Journal of Interdisciplinary Music Studies, 6(1), 55-85. info:/

Araya-Salas, Marcelo. (2012) Is birdsong music? Evaluating harmonic intervals in songs of a Neotropical songbird. Animal Behaviour, 84(2), 309-313. info:/10.1016/j.anbehav.2012.04.038

  • October 20, 2013
  • 10:07 AM
  • 421 views

OpenCitations.net calls for help

by egonw in Chem-bla-ics

I don't think I mentioned this JISC project by David Shotton et al. yet, and should perhaps have done so earlier. But it is not too late, as Shotton is calling out for help in a Nature Comment this week (doi:10.1038/502295a). Now, I have been tracking what is citing the CDK literature using CiteUlike since 2010, and just asked the project developers how I can contribute this data.

Interestingly, the visualization from OpenCitations.net is interesting as it also shows papers citing papers t........ Read more »

D. Shotton. (2013) Publishing: Open citations. Nature, 502(7471), 295-297. info:/10.1038/502295a

  • October 19, 2013
  • 06:29 AM
  • 640 views

The Selective Clearance of Senescent Cells – a Promising Target for Ageing

by Robert Seymour in NeuroFractal

When cells are put under stress (e.g. UV light, ionising radiation, reactive oxygen species) they undergo a process known as cellular senescence in which cell division (mitosis) is arrested. This is thought to contribute to ageing. In their 2013 paper Naylor and colleagues outline a strategy to selectively remove in vivo senescent cells expressing p16Ink4A .... Read more »

  • October 18, 2013
  • 07:23 AM
  • 349 views

A sting operation stimulates debate about publishing research

by Valerie Ashton in The Molecular Scribe

On 17 October, I travelled to London to participate in the annual Publications Seminars. As suggested by the programme, the presenters focused on discussing changes in the publications industry. One of the most heated debates of the event highlighted a recent sting operation published in Science.1 The researcher, John Bohannon, aimed to uncover how rigorous the peer review process is in open access journals that do not charge their readers for viewing content. John Bohannon wrote a far-fetched f........ Read more »

Bohannon J. (2013) Who's Afraid of Peer Review?. Science (New York, N.Y.), 342(6154), 60-65. PMID: 24092725  

  • October 17, 2013
  • 10:28 AM
  • 369 views

Number of New Energy Patents Increased Dramatically

by dailyfusion in The Daily Fusion

A recent study by MIT and Santa Fe Institute (SFI) researchers found a “dramatic growth in innovation” in renewable energy technologies.... Read more »

Luis M. A. Bettencourt, Jessika E. Trancik, & Jasleen Kaur. (2013) Determinants of the Pace of Global Innovation in Energy Technologies. PLoS ONE, 8(10). arXiv: 1211.5167v1

  • October 16, 2013
  • 09:37 AM
  • 337 views

Open Access Journals: Overgrowth and Erosion of Quality?

by Nura Rutten in United Academics

Last week, Science published an article that exposed the shortcomings of open-access journals. Author John Bohannon, a science journalist, created fake papers to evaluate the quality of peer review and to find out whether they would be submitted.... Read more »

  • October 15, 2013
  • 02:37 AM
  • 417 views

The Matthew effect and REF2014

by Dorothy Bishop in bishopblog

UK universities are gearing up for REF2014, a nationwide evaluation of research quality, on the basis of which central funding will be determined. Before the funding formula is specified, we need a discussion about whether we should be focusing mainly on supporting elite institutions, or whether it would be preferable to distribute funds more widely.... Read more »

  • October 9, 2013
  • 10:43 AM
  • 643 views

Honeybees Can Avoid Deadlock When Making Group Decisions, So Why Can't We?

by Miss Behavior in The Scorpion and the Frog

This honeybee swarm has precious little time to make a democratic decision as to where they will move to. A decision deadlock could have fatal consequences. Image by Nino Barbieri at Wikimedia Commons.In case you've been living in a cave lately, the U.S. Government has been shut down since October 1st. Not because of a terrorist attack or a bank system meltdown or a natural disaster, but because Congress cannot agree on a spending bill to determine our government's funding plan for the next year........ Read more »

  • October 8, 2013
  • 11:08 AM
  • 537 views

The Scientific Publishing Sting: a Missed Opportunity? | @GrrlScientist

by GrrlScientist in GrrlScientist

The Science of Science's Open Access Sting: don't shoot the messenger, or you might shoot yourself in the foot... Read more »

Bohannon J. (2013) Who's Afraid of Peer Review?. Science, 342(6154), 60-65. DOI: 10.1126/science.342.6154.60  

  • October 4, 2013
  • 08:13 AM
  • 680 views

Why PLOS ONE is no longer my default journal

by Juan Nunez-Iglesias in I Love Symposia!

Time-to-publication at the world’s biggest scientific journal has grown dramatically, but the nail in the coffin was its poor production policies. When PLOS ONE was announced in 2006, its charter immediately resonated with me. This would be the first journal where only scientific accuracy mattered. Judgments of “impact” and “interest” would be left to posterity, […]... Read more »

  • October 3, 2013
  • 06:34 PM
  • 503 views

Take a walk on the wild side: Dingo science

by Cobb & Hecht in Do You Believe In Dog?

Image: Bradley SmithHi Mia and Julie,As one of the few in the world exploring the ‘mind’ of the dingo, the highly controversial wild dog of Australia, I consider myself quite a rare ‘breed’ of scientist. So I thought I would let you know about some of the recent work I have done with dingoes, including a few world first discoveries. It seems dingoes are becoming just as famous for solving problems as they are for causing them!I find the differences between the way wild and domestic dogs ........ Read more »

  • October 3, 2013
  • 04:34 PM
  • 600 views

Exhibitionism in Medical Education: The Brindley Lecture – Heralding A Sexual Revolution

by Pranab Chatterjee in Scepticemia

The first boom in treatment for male erectile dysfunction came in the 1920s and 1930 when the Russian-origin French surgeon Serge Abramovitch Voronoff started to prescribe surgical implantation of monkey testicles in the human scrotum to augment sexual prowess. This gained quite a bit of fan following for a couple of decades and brough Voronoff […]... Read more »

  • October 1, 2013
  • 04:52 AM
  • 604 views

Long Term Opioid Treatment: Help or Harm?

by Kim Kristiansen in Picture of Pain

It is an everyday consideration in healthcare for both patients and clinicians: should opioid therapy be started and if, when should it be stopped again?... Read more »

Kim Kristiansen, M.D. (2013) Long Term Opioid Treatment: Help or Harm? . Picture of Pain Blog. info:/

  • September 26, 2013
  • 10:12 AM
  • 379 views

Predicting Who Will Publish or Perish as Career Academics

by Bill Laurance et al in United Academics

It doesn’t matter whether or not you think it’s fair: if you’re an academic, your publishing record will have a crucial impact on your career.

It can profoundly affect your prospects for employment, for winning research grants, for climbing the academic ladder, for having a teaching load that doesn’t absorb all your time, for winning academic prizes and fellowships, and for gaining the respect of your peers.... Read more »

Dr. William F Laurance,, Diane Carolina Useche, Susan Gai Laurance and Prof. Corey J. A. Bradshaw. (2013) Predicting Publication Success for Biologists. BioScience. info:/

  • September 19, 2013
  • 07:25 AM
  • 569 views

When dogs die: the science of sad

by Cobb & Hecht in Do You Believe In Dog?

Farewell to ElkeAh, Julie...I’m not even really sure where to start. "On Sunday I sat outside in the sun, stroking Elke's so-soft ears, while my husband patted her long, sleek back, and we farewelled our first girl. We learned on Friday that her liver and spleen were full of cancer. We are so grateful to have shared 12.5yrs with her and will miss her dearly." is what my Facebook status update said.But let's start at the beginning...Little Elke-Moo and her cow hips, at RSPCAI met Elke........ Read more »

Archer John, & Winchester Gillian. (1994) Bereavement following death of a pet. British Journal of Psychology, 85(2), 259-271. DOI: 10.1111/j.2044-8295.1994.tb02522.x  

Weisman Avery D. (1990) Bereavement and Companion Animals. OMEGA--Journal of Death and Dying, 22(4), 241-248. DOI: 10.2190/C54Y-UGMH-QGR4-CWTL  

Podrazik Donna, Shackford Shane, Becker Louis, & Heckert Troy. (2000) The Death of a Pet: Implications for Loss and Bereavement Across the Lifespan. Journal of Personal and Interpersonal Loss, 5(4), 361-395. DOI: 10.1080/10811440008407852  

Field Nigel, Orsini Lisa, Gavish Roni, & Packman Wendy. (2009) Role of Attachment in Response to Pet Loss. Death Studies, 33(4), 334-355. DOI: 10.1080/07481180802705783  

Crossley Michelle. (2013) Pet Loss and Human Bereavement: A Phenomenological Study of Attachment and the Grieving Process. PhD Thesis. info:other/http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/resolver/1840.16/8451

  • September 16, 2013
  • 09:58 PM
  • 340 views

The science of scientific reporting - we suck at communicating our results to the public

by Megan Carter in Verdant Nation

One of my favourite PhD comics is "The Science News Cycle." I think it adequately portrays one of science's fundamental flaws, communicating research findings to Joe Public. Or, in the case of the comic, grandma.Knowledge exchange. Even the phrase is jargon. As researchers, we don't do it very well. We write up our research for the scientific community with the ultimate goal of publishing articles in scientific journals, and of course, eventually the Lancet or The New England Journal o........ Read more »

Government Office for Science. (2007) Tackling Obesities: Future Choices – Project Report 2nd Edition . FORESIGHT Programme. info:/

  • September 12, 2013
  • 12:00 PM
  • 470 views

Evaluate, evaluate, evaluate

by Dorothy Bishop in bishopblog

Early career scientists often imagine that senior academics are able to spend much of their time doing research. The reality is that an increasing proportion of time is taken up with evaluation: reviewing papers and grants, writing references, examining theses, etc.... Read more »

Fogelholm, Mikael, Leppinen, Saara, Auvinen, Anssi, Raitanen, Jani, Nuutinen, Anu, & Väänänen, Kalervo. (2012) Panel discussion does not improve reliability of peer review for medical research grant proposals. Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, 65(1), 47-52. DOI: 10.1016/j.jclinepi.2011.05.001  

  • September 10, 2013
  • 04:39 AM
  • 397 views

The cost of the rejection-resubmission cycle

by Björn Brembs in bjoern.brembs.blog

Rejection is one of the unpleasant but inevitable components of life. There are positive components to rejection: they build character, they force you to deal with negativity and sometimes they force you to change your life to avoid future rejections. […] ↓ Read the rest of this entry...... Read more »

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