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  • September 27, 2015
  • 06:24 PM
  • 701 views

History of Cataloguing. 1. Ranganathan

by Anne Welsh in Library Marginalia

This post is the first in a series sparked by the selection of books for the History of Cataloguing section of the reading list for the core cataloguing module on the MA LIS. It highlights what Ranganathan had to say in his Five Laws (1931) regarding Cataloguing.... Read more »

S.R. Ranganathan. (1931) The Five Laws of Library Science. Hathi Trust Digital Library. info:/

  • September 27, 2015
  • 02:45 PM
  • 523 views

Breaking the anxiety cycle

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

A woman who won’t drive long distances because she has panic attacks in the car. A man who has contamination fears so intense he cannot bring himself to use public bathrooms. A woman who can’t go to church because she fears enclosed spaces. All of these people have two things in common: they have an anxiety disorder. They’re also parents.... Read more »

  • September 26, 2015
  • 03:31 PM
  • 512 views

Scientists discover new system for human genome editing

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

A team including the scientist who first harnessed the revolutionary CRISPR-Cas9 system for mammalian genome editing has now identified a different CRISPR system with the potential for even simpler and more precise genome engineering. In the study researchers describe the unexpected biological features of this new system and demonstrate that it can be engineered to edit the genomes of human cells.... Read more »

Zetsche, B., Gootenberg, J., Abudayyeh, O., Slaymaker, I., Makarova, K., Essletzbichler, P., Volz, S., Joung, J., van der Oost, J., Regev, A.... (2015) Cpf1 Is a Single RNA-Guided Endonuclease of a Class 2 CRISPR-Cas System. Cell. DOI: 10.1016/j.cell.2015.09.038  

  • September 25, 2015
  • 03:08 PM
  • 586 views

It’s alive!! Study adds to evidence that viruses are alive

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Classifying something as living isn’t as easy as it sounds, after all we are all atoms, so when do atoms go from nonliving to living? Despite the complexities of viruses, we have historically deemed them nonliving. However, a new analysis supports the hypothesis that viruses are living entities that share a long evolutionary history with cells. The study offers the first reliable method for tracing viral evolution back to a time when neither viruses nor cells existed in the forms recognized to........ Read more »

Arshan Nasir, & Gustavo Caetano-Anollés. (2015) A phylogenomic data-driven exploration of viral origins and evolution. Science Advances. info:/10.1126/sciadv.1500527

  • September 24, 2015
  • 02:59 PM
  • 565 views

Mexico City’s air pollution has detrimental impact on Alzheimer’s disease gene

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

A new study by researchers heightens concerns over the detrimental impact of air pollution on hippocampal metabolites as early markers of neurodegeneration in young urbanites carrying an allele 4 of the apolipoprotein E gene (APOE). This is associated with the risk for Alzheimer disease (AD) and a susceptibility marker for poor outcome in traumatic brain injury (TBI) recovery.... Read more »

  • September 23, 2015
  • 03:27 PM
  • 662 views

What motivates ‘Facebook stalking’ after a romantic breakup?

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Social networking makes it easy to monitor the status and activities of a former romantic partner, an often unhealthy use of social media known as interpersonal electronic surveillance (IES) or, more commonly, “Facebook stalking.” Psychological and relationship factors and how individuals cope with the termination of a romantic relationship can help predict their use of online surveillance, according to a new study.... Read more »

  • September 23, 2015
  • 11:00 AM
  • 687 views

The BMJ requires data sharing to publish clinical trials

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

Increased publication of clinical trial outcomes has been promoted by regional and global initiatives in order to increase transparency, reproducibility and reliability of the assays. The BMJ follows this movement, becoming the first journal to require availability of individual patient data, anonymously and upon request, as a prerequisite for publication. … Read More →... Read more »

  • September 23, 2015
  • 07:39 AM
  • 518 views

What about Lignin?

by ragothamanyennamalli in Getting to know Structural Bioinformatics

Biofuel prodcution involves removing Lignin from the biomass, in fact efficient removal so that Lignin and its by-products do not inhibit the enzymatic process that follows. But, what happens to the Lignin? ... Read more »

Bourzac, K. (2015) Inner Workings: Paving with plants. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 112(38), 11743-11744. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1509010112  

  • September 22, 2015
  • 05:02 PM
  • 509 views

Genetic analysis supports prediction that spontaneous rare mutations cause half of autism

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

A team led by researchers at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) has published a new analysis of data on the genetics of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). One commonly held theory is that autism results from the chance combinations of commonly occurring gene mutations, which are otherwise harmless. But the authors’ work provides support for a different theory.... Read more »

Ivan Iossifov, Dan Levy, Jeremy Allen, Kenny Ye, Michael Ronemus, Yoon-ha Lee, Boris Yamrom, & Michael Wigler. (2015) Low load for disruptive mutations in autism genes and their biased transmission. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences in the United States of America. info:/

  • September 21, 2015
  • 02:18 PM
  • 497 views

‘Delayed remembering’: Kids can remember tomorrow what they forgot today

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

For adults, memories tend to fade with time. But a new study has shown that there are circumstances under which the opposite is true for small children: they can remember a piece of information better days later than they can on the day they first learned it. While playing a video game that asked them to remember associations between objects, 4- and 5-year-olds who re-played the game after a two-day delay scored more than 20 percent higher than kids who re-played it later the same day.... Read more »

Kevin Darby. (20115) ‘Delayed remembering’: kids can remember tomorrow what they forgot today. Psychological Science. info:/

  • September 20, 2015
  • 03:01 PM
  • 437 views

A barrier against brain stem cell aging

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Neural stem cells generate new neurons throughout life in the mammalian brain. However, with advancing age the potential for regeneration in the brain dramatically declines. Scientists now identified a novel mechanism of how neural stem cells stay relatively free of aging-induced damage. A diffusion barrier regulates the sorting of damaged proteins during cell division.... Read more »

Moore, D., Pilz, G., Arauzo-Bravo, M., Barral, Y., & Jessberger, S. (2015) A mechanism for the segregation of age in mammalian neural stem cells. Science, 349(6254), 1334-1338. DOI: 10.1126/science.aac9868  

  • September 19, 2015
  • 02:49 PM
  • 573 views

Schizophrenia: Repairing the brain

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Research led by scientists from Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School Singapore (Duke-NUS) has linked the abnormal behaviour of two genes (BDNF and DTNBP1) to the underlying cause of schizophrenia. These findings have provided a new target for schizophrenia treatment.... Read more »

  • September 18, 2015
  • 03:14 PM
  • 568 views

Types of athletic training affect how brain communicates with muscles

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Using endurance training or strength and resistance training not only prepares an athlete for different types of sports, they can also change the way the brain and muscles communicate with each other.... Read more »

  • September 17, 2015
  • 02:14 PM
  • 517 views

Vaccine clears some precancerous cervical lesions in clinical trial

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Scientists have used a genetically engineered vaccine to successfully eradicate high-grade precancerous cervical lesions in nearly one-half of women who received the vaccine in a clinical trial. The goal, say the scientists, was to find nonsurgical ways to treat precancerous lesions caused by HPV.... Read more »

  • September 17, 2015
  • 01:39 PM
  • 710 views

The favourable perception of open access increases among researchers

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

A research conducted by the Nature Publishing Group indicates that the perception of open access (OA) publishing is rapidly changing among researchers. In 2014, 40% of authors who have not published in OA journals declared themselves concerned about the quality of publications, a percentage which fell to 27% in 2015. The NPG supports OA publications and recognizes its importance, publishing 56% of the articles in this format. … Read More →... Read more »

  • September 16, 2015
  • 04:00 PM
  • 693 views

Immune system may be pathway between nature and good health

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Research has found evidence that spending time in nature provides protections against a startling range of diseases, including depression, diabetes, obesity, ADHD, cardiovascular disease, cancer, and many more. How this exposure to green space leads to better health has remained a mystery. After reviewing hundreds of studies examining nature’s effects on health, researchers believe the answer lies in nature’s ability to enhance the functioning of the body’s immune system.... Read more »

  • September 15, 2015
  • 02:47 PM
  • 486 views

Students in credit crisis

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

New research from the USA suggests that college students are well aware that they should be personally responsible for their finances, including their card obligations, but this awareness rarely correlates with limiting the debts they accrue during their time in higher education.... Read more »

  • September 14, 2015
  • 03:05 PM
  • 556 views

Viruses flourish in guts of healthy babies

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Bacteria aren't the only nonhuman invaders to colonize the gut shortly after a baby's birth. Viruses also set up house there, according to new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. All together, these invisible residents are thought to play important roles in human health.... Read more »

Lim, E., Zhou, Y., Zhao, G., Bauer, I., Droit, L., Ndao, I., Warner, B., Tarr, P., Wang, D., & Holtz, L. (2015) Early life dynamics of the human gut virome and bacterial microbiome in infants. Nature Medicine. DOI: 10.1038/nm.3950  

  • September 13, 2015
  • 03:15 PM
  • 642 views

Concept Mapping vs. Retrieval Practice

by Joshua Fisher in Text Savvy

Although some relevant differences were not significant in this study, the effects reported in the previous studies, along with the time differentials in the conditions leads one to believe that, all other things being equal, retrieval practice is likely superior to concept mapping for learning (from texts).... Read more »

  • September 13, 2015
  • 02:51 PM
  • 5,600 views

Diet beverage drinkers compensate by eating unhealthy food

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Want fries with that diet soda? You aren’t alone, and you may not be “saving” as many calories as you think by consuming diet drinks. A new study that examined the dietary habits of more than 22,000 U.S. adults found that diet-beverage consumers may compensate for the absence of calories in their drinks by noshing on extra food that is loaded with sugar, sodium, fat and cholesterol.... Read more »

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