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  • November 14, 2015
  • 04:18 PM
  • 510 views

3-D printing aids in understanding food enjoyment

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Tasting food relies on food volatiles moving from the back of the mouth to the nasal cavity, but researchers have wondered why airflow doesn’t carry them in the other direction, into the lungs. Now a team of engineers, using a 3D printed model of the human airway from nostril to trachea, has determined that the shape of the airway preferentially transfers volatiles to the nasal cavity and allows humans to enjoy the smell of good food.... Read more »

Ni, R., Michalski, M., Brown, E., Doan, N., Zinter, J., Ouellette, N., & Shepherd, G. (2015) Optimal directional volatile transport in retronasal olfaction. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1511495112  

  • November 13, 2015
  • 08:32 PM
  • 579 views

Not so happy old age?

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

The notion that older people are happier than younger people is being challenged following a recent study led by a University of Bradford lecturer. In fact it suggests that people get more depressed from age 65 onwards. The study, led by psychology lecturer Dr Helena Chui, builds on a 15-year project observing over 2,000 older Australians living in the Adelaide area.... Read more »

  • November 13, 2015
  • 08:43 AM
  • 770 views

Predatory journals: the dark side of Open Access

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

Low quality non peer reviewed open access journals called ‘predatory’ compromise the credibility of open access publishing and cause damage to this business model’s reputation. A detailed study analyzes these journals and their publishers, including geographic location and authors’ profile. … Read More →... Read more »

  • November 12, 2015
  • 02:13 PM
  • 521 views

It’s music to my eyes

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

When people are listening to music, their emotional reactions to the music are reflected in changes in their pupil size. Researchers from the University of Vienna and the University of Innsbruck, Austria, are the first to show that both the emotional content of the music and the listeners’ personal involvement with music influence pupil dilation. This study demonstrates that pupil size measurement can be effectively used to probe listeners’ reactions to music.... Read more »

  • November 11, 2015
  • 04:53 PM
  • 490 views

A protein-RNA structure hints at how viruses commandeer human proteins

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Researchers at Case Western Reserve University and the University of Michigan have produced the first image of an important human protein as it binds with ribonucleic acid (RNA), a discovery that could offer clues to how some viruses, including HIV, control expression of their genetic material. That information could lead to new strategies to block viruses from replicating, thereby limiting or halting infection.... Read more »

  • November 11, 2015
  • 11:10 AM
  • 772 views

Short-term stability and long-term collapse: exploring the complex behavior of the Antarctic ice sheet

by Jonathan Trinastic in Goodnight Earth

A recent study indicates that Antarctic sea ice is growing, but what about its long-term evolution? Read on to see what scientists have discovered about the Antarctic's future.... Read more »

  • November 11, 2015
  • 03:29 AM
  • 991 views

Obesity Is Not Like Being "Addicted to Food"

by The Neurocritic in The Neurocritic

Credit: Image courtesy of Aalto UniversityIs it possible to be “addicted” to food, much like an addiction to substances (e.g., alcohol, cocaine, opiates) or behaviors (gambling, shopping, Facebook)? An extensive and growing literature uses this terminology in the context of the “obesity epidemic”, and looks for the root genetic and neurobiological causes (Carlier et al., 2015; Volkow & Bailer, 2015).Fig. 1 (Meule, 2015). Number of scientific publications on food addiction (1990-2014........ Read more »

  • November 10, 2015
  • 02:36 PM
  • 786 views

Reproducibility Crisis: The Plot Thickens

by Neuroskeptic in Neuroskeptic_Discover

A new paper from British psychologists David Shanks and colleagues will add to the growing sense of a "reproducibility crisis" in the field of psychology.

The paper is called Romance, Risk, and Replication and it examines the question of whether subtle reminders of 'mating motives' (i.e. sex) can make people more willing to spend money and take risks. In 'romantic priming' experiments, participants are first 'primed' e.g. by reading a story about meeting an attractive member of the opposite s... Read more »

Shanks DR, Vadillo MA, Riedel B, Clymo A, Govind S, Hickin N, Tamman AJ, & Puhlmann LM. (2015) Romance, Risk, and Replication: Can Consumer Choices and Risk-Taking Be Primed by Mating Motives?. Journal of experimental psychology. General. PMID: 26501730  

  • November 10, 2015
  • 02:19 PM
  • 389 views

New vaccine could prevent high cholesterol

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

A new cholesterol-lowering vaccine leads to reductions in ‘bad’ LDL cholesterol in mice and macaques, according to research. The authors of the study, from the University of New Mexico and the National Institutes of health in the United States, say the vaccine has the potential to be a more powerful treatment than statins alone.... Read more »

Crossey, E., Amar, M., Sampson, M., Peabody, J., Schiller, J., Chackerian, B., & Remaley, A. (2015) A cholesterol-lowering VLP vaccine that targets PCSK9. Vaccine, 33(43), 5747-5755. DOI: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2015.09.044  

  • November 9, 2015
  • 06:50 PM
  • 558 views

One energy drink may increase heart disease risk in young adults

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

New research shows that drinking one 16-ounce energy drink can increase blood pressure and stress hormone responses significantly. This raises the concern that these response changes could increase the risk of cardiovascular events.... Read more »

  • November 9, 2015
  • 01:17 PM
  • 852 views

Solving the silicon swelling problem in batteries

by Jonathan Trinastic in Goodnight Earth

Silicon anodes offer great capacity for next-generation batteries but suffer from volume expansion that degrades batteries. Here new research has found a clever method to allow for volume expansion and maintain their high potential capacity!... Read more »

  • November 8, 2015
  • 03:34 PM
  • 568 views

The connection between masculinity, energy drink use, and sleep problems

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Energy drinks have grown in popularity for many Americans, but there is growing concern about the health risks of consuming them in large quantities. Because men are the main consumers of energy drinks, a research team lead by Dr. Ronald F. Levant, a professor of psychology at The University of Akron, set out to study a possible link between masculinity, expectations about the benefits of consuming energy drinks, how those expectations affect energy drink use, and the impact on sleep.... Read more »

  • November 7, 2015
  • 02:32 PM
  • 499 views

The first line of defense? Think Mucus

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

By licking a wound it heals faster — this is not simply popular belief, but scientifically proven. Our saliva consists of water and mucus, among other things, and the mucus plays an important role. It stimulates white blood cells to build a good defense against invaders, according to a group of researchers at Lund University in Sweden together with colleagues from Copenhagen and Odense in Denmark.... Read more »

Mohanty, T., Sjogren, J., Kahn, F., Abu-Humaidan, A., Fisker, N., Assing, K., Morgelin, M., Bengtsson, A., Borregaard, N., & Sorensen, O. (2015) A novel mechanism for NETosis provides antimicrobial defense at the oral mucosa. Blood, 126(18), 2128-2137. DOI: 10.1182/blood-2015-04-641142  

  • November 6, 2015
  • 10:54 PM
  • 507 views

Cancer survivors less likely to receive callbacks from potential employers

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Job applicants who are cancer survivors are less likely to receive callbacks from potential retail employers than those who did not disclose their health history, according to a recent study by Rice University and Penn State University researchers.... Read more »

  • November 6, 2015
  • 05:30 PM
  • 782 views

Concept Before Procedure? It Doesn't Matter

by Joshua Fisher in Text Savvy

Overall, both longitudinal and experimental studies indicate that procedural knowledge leads to improvements in conceptual knowledge, in addition to vice versa. The relations between the two types of knowledge are bidirectional. It is a myth that it is a "one-way street" from conceptual knowledge to procedural knowledge.... Read more »

  • November 5, 2015
  • 03:55 PM
  • 554 views

Adults’ happiness on the decline

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Are you less happy than your parents were at the same age? It may not be all in your head. Researchers led by San Diego State University professor Jean M. Twenge found adults over age 30 are not as happy as they used to be, but teens and young adults are happier than ever. Researchers analyzed data from four nationally representative samples of 1.3 million Americans ages 13 to 96 taken from 1972 to 2014.... Read more »

Jean M. Twenge, Ryne A. Sherman, & Sonja Lyubomirsky. (2015) More Happiness for Young People and Less for Mature Adults: Time Period Differences in Subjective Well-Being in the United States, 1972–2014. Social Psychological and Personality Science. info:/10.1177/1948550615602933

  • November 5, 2015
  • 12:25 PM
  • 800 views

Bibliometric indicators of the European scientific production

by SciELO in SciELO in Perspective

Europe brings together many countries leaders in scientific and technological research and has encouraged cooperation programs between institutions, countries and regions to foster competitiveness, impact and relevance in research. A comprehensive study based on bibliometric indices analyzes the scientific output of the region and appraises its contribution to the realization of the European Research Area. … Read More →... Read more »

European Comission. (2015) Analysis of Bibliometric Indicators for European Policies 2000-2013. European Comission. info:/http://dx.doi.org/10.2777/194026

  • November 4, 2015
  • 06:29 PM
  • 462 views

Brain’s immune system could be harnessed to fight Alzheimer’s

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

A new study suggests that the brain’s immune system could potentially be harnessed to help clear the amyloid plaques that are a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease.... Read more »

  • November 3, 2015
  • 02:26 PM
  • 573 views

Lipid helps keep algae and brain fluid moving

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

The same lipid that helps algae swim toward the light also appears to enable one type of brain cell to keep cerebrospinal fluid moving, researchers report. ... Read more »

Kong, J., Hardin, K., Dinkins, M., Wang, G., He, Q., Mujadzic, T., Zhu, G., Bielawski, J., Spassieva, S., & Bieberich, E. (2015) Regulation of Chlamydomonas flagella and ependymal cell motile cilia by ceramide-mediated translocation of GSK3. Molecular Biology of the Cell. DOI: 10.1091/mbc.E15-06-0371  

  • November 2, 2015
  • 07:05 PM
  • 559 views

Predicting what side effects you’ll experience from a drug

by Dr. Jekyll in Lunatic Laboratories

Researchers at the University of California, San Diego have developed a model that could be used to predict a drug’s side effects on different patients. The proof of concept study is aimed at determining how different individuals will respond to a drug treatment and could help assess whether a drug is suitable for a particular patient based on measurements taken from the patient’s blood.... Read more »

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